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Full text of "The Faulkner cook book"



J 



The 



Faulkner 
Cook Book 



The 




Faulkner Cook Book 









I consider the discovery of a dish vohich 
sustains our appetite and prolongs our 
pleasures as afar more interesting event 
than the discovery of a star, for voe 
always have stars enough. 

— Henrion de Pensey. 



Published for the Benefit of 

The Faulkner Hospital Aid Association 

jamaica plain, mass. 

1914 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS, CAMBRIDGE, U. S. A. 



CONTENTS 

Soups 1 

Fish 8 

Meats ■ . 13 

Vegetables 28 

Salads and Salad Dressings 32 

Eggs and Cheese 41 

Desserts : • . . 49 

Pudding and Ice Cream Sauces 71 

Frozen Desserts 73 

Breads and Muffins 77 

Cakes, Cookies, and Gingerbreads ......... 90 

Chafing-Dish Recipes 116 

Fruits, Pickles, and Preserves 122 

Confectionery 136 

Beverages 139 

Sandwiches 142 

Miscellaneous 145 

Memoranda 146 

Index 153 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

2 cups of butter, packed solidly = 1 pound. 

4 cups of pastry flour = 1 pound. 

2 cups of granulated sugar = 1 pound. 

2% cups of | P( ^ ^ | sugar = 1 pound. 

2 cups of finely chopped meat "= 1 pound. 

1 square of Baker's chocolate = 1 ounce. 

3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon. 
16 tablespoons = 1 cup. 

4 tablespoons = J^ cup. 

2 tablespoons of butter = 1 ounce. 
4 tablespoons of flour = 1 ounce. 

All measurements should be made level unless otherwise stated. 

" No rule is so general, which admits not some exception." 

— Robert Burton. 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



"Thirteen at table is a number to be dreaded only when there is just enough 
to go round for twelve." 

— L'Almanach des Gourmands. 



SOUPS 

BAKED BEAN SOUP 

MISS HELEN T. COMINS 

Boil in one quart of milk one and one-half cups of mashed 
baked beans for about twenty minutes. Season with pepper and 
salt and if necessary thicken with a little braided flour. Strain 
well and serve. 

SQUASH SOUP 

MISS HELEN T. COMINS 

One cup of boiled squash, boiled about twenty minutes with 
one quart of milk. Season with pepper and salt and a dash of 
nutmeg. Braid butter the size of a nut with a little flour to 
thicken. Strain well and serve. 

LENTEN BROTH 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

Cook for two hours two pounds of flounder or any white fish 
cut up, with one carrot, one turnip, two pieces of celery, a 
bunch of herbs, and two quarts of water. Take out the fish, re- 
move the bones and skin, put fish back again, and add one pint 
of boiling milk mixed with flour and butter, yolks of two eggs, 
and juice of one-half lemon, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Press 
through strainer and serve hot. 

i 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



NELLIE'S TOMATO BISQUE 

MRS. NELSON HOWARD 

Scald one quart of milk in a double boiler, add one heaping 
tablespoon of flour wet with water, and one sliced onion, and 
cook fifteen minutes. Put one can of Campbell's tomato soup 
into the milk about five minutes before serving and add butter, 
salt, and pepper. If it curdles use the egg beater. 

If canned tomato is used cook one-half can with a pinch of 
soda and sugar about fifteen minutes, then strain and add to 
milk. 

WHITE SOUP 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Scald two cups of milk and add four cups of chicken broth or 
veal stock; thicken with two tablespoons of flour; add salt, pepper, 
and celery salt to taste. 

WHITE SOUP 

MRS. HENRY B. CHAPIN 

Take a knuckle of veal weighing from four to six pounds, six 
quarts of water, a pint bowl of macaroni, one onion, one turnip, 
a little mace, salt, and white pepper, and boil six hours in a closely 
covered pot. Strain. Beat three eggs very light and stir with 
one-half cup of cream into the soup when scalding hot. 

CORN CHOWDER 

MRS* WINTHROP C. DURFEE 

Fry to a light brown one slice of finely chopped pork, stirring 
to prevent burning. Fry light brown one medium-sized onion, 
chopped; add one-fourth teaspoon of pepper. Have boiling two 
large potatoes, sliced very thin, and when tender drain well and 
add to fried onion with one quart of milk, one teaspoon of salt, 
and one can of corn. Boil five minutes. Add four crackers which 
have been split and soaked in cold milk, and one tablespoon of 
butter. When heated again, serve. 



SOUPS 3 

CREAM OF BEET SOUP 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

« 

Scrub well and cook without cutting two dark-red beets. When 
tender drop into cold water for two or three minutes, then remove 
skin and rub through strainer. Cook one tablespoon of butter 
with one tablespoon of chopped onion for five minutes; add one 
tablespoon of flour and, when boiling, pour on slowly one pint of 
hot white stock; add four pepper corns, one blade of mace, one 
teaspoon of salt, and simmer ten minutes. Add one pint of hot 
milk, strained beet, and one cup of cream. 

PEA SOUP 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Cover two cups of split peas well and cook at least four hours. 
Put two slices of bacon and one onion through the meat chopper 
and add to peas when put on stove, also one bay leaf. Cook 
until half an hour before serving, then strain through sieve. 
Heat one pint of milk and add just *bef ore serving, with salt and 
pepper to taste. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Soak one quart of black beans over night in six quarts of water, 
and boil in same water for six hours. After boiling two hours add 
beef bones or any meat, one onion, one-half carrot, and a large 
cup of rice. Just before serving add one-half pint of claret, one- 
half lemon, sliced, and sliced hard-boiled eggs. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP 

MISS KATHARINE R. WENDELL 

One and one-half pints of beans if you do not soak them over 
night, one pint if you do. One teaspoon of summer savory, one 
onion, a small bit of pork. Boil with a beef bone, turkey or chicken 
bones. Put in soup dish one sliced lemon, four eggs, boiled hard 
and sliced, one-half tumbler of wine, and one-half large cup of 
tomato catsup. 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



CLAM SOUP 

MRS. WILLIAM D. HOWLAND 

Get three pints of clams with all the liquor the fishman will 
give. Remove the soft parts and keep them intact. Take the 
snouts and chop them, then put them on to boil with the soft 
parts and liquor. As soon as any scum rises skim it off. First let 
it boil hard, then put it back on the stove and let simmer about 
half an hour, taking care that the soft parts do not break. Put 
in pepper and salt to taste. 

In a double boiler heat a little less than a quart of milk. Take a 
little of the cold milk in a cup and stir in slowly a tablespoon of 
flour, making a smooth paste. Pour this into the milk and let 
simmer. Just before serving strain the clams and put the liquor 
on to come to a boil again. Then pour the liquor into a hot 
tureen, and just before serving pour in the hot milk. 

VEGETABLE SOUP 

MRS. H. O. HOFMAN 

4 quarts of water 13^ carrots 
3 or 4 turnips 2 onions 

5 or 6 leeks, if you have them 5 or 6 large potatoes 

Cook for four hours, then pass through a colander. Thicken 
with tapioca. 

VEGETABLE SOUP 

MRS. H. DE FOREST LOCKWOOD 

3 pints of skinned tomatoes 3 pints of sliced okras 

1 gallon of water 1 onion, sliced very fine 

Irish potatoes, sliced Corn cut from the cob 

Handful of parsley Thyme, celery, rice, pepper, and 

salt 

Thicken with brown flour rubbed with butter. 

Be sure to salt while it is boiling. 

Put the water, okra, and tomatoes on to boil two and a half 
hours before needed, and add the other vegetables according to 
the time they require to cook. 



SOUPS 5 

MUSHROOM SOUP 

MRS. ANDREW J. PETERS 

One pound of mushrooms, peeled and fried in butter until 
brown. Take the parings and boil in one and one-half cups of 
water for half an hour, then strain and add two tablespoons of 
butter, rubbed with two heaping tablespoons of flour, and one 
quart of hot milk. Boil together and add the mushrooms, chopped 
to about the size of small peas. Season to taste. 

Whip one cup of cream, and after putting the very hot soup 
into very hot soup plates, put some cream on top of each and 
serve. 

MUSHROOM SOUP 

MRS. CHARLES HILL 

x /2 pound of mushrooms 1 quart of milk, heated 

Small piece of butter A little cream 

Salt and pepper to season well 

Cook mushrooms in a little water until all the juice is out of 
them. Strain and add to the hot milk. Just before serving season, 
and thicken soup with a little flour and butter. Add a few whole 
small mushrooms and serve. 



CREAM OF OATMEAL SOUP 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Put one tablespoon of butter and one tablespoon of chopped 
onion in soup kettle and shake until onion is slightly browned. 
Draw kettle back and let the onion soften. Add one pint of cold 
cooked oatmeal, one quart of milk, one bay leaf, two whole cloves, 
one teaspoon of salt, and one saltspoon of pepper. Stir until 
boiling point is reached, strain through a fine sieve, reheat, and 
pour hot into tureen over beaten yolk of one egg. 

VELVET SOUP 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Cook one quart of any good stock with one cup of cream and 
seasonings to taste. Pour boiling hot onto the yolks of four eggs 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



beaten with one-half cup of cream; reheat and serve as soon as it 
reaches boiling point. 

CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER SOUP 

BARONESS VON SCHOLLEY 

Put two ounces of butter in a saucepan, add three tablespoons of 
flour, stir well, and add three pints of the liquid in which the cauli- 
flower has been boiled, one teaspoon of salt, twelve whole pepper 
corns, and several sprigs of parsley. Boil half an hour, then strain 
through a fine sieve, and add the half head of cauliflower which 
has been cooked and separated into small flowerets. Just before 
serving stir in one-half cup of thick sweet cream. 

PALESTINE SOUP 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Take two quarts of any white stock or liquor in which fowl or 
mutton has been boiled, and boil in it two pounds of Jerusalem 
artichokes, weighed after they are peeled, four large onions, a 
small stick of celery, and two lumps of sugar. When the vegeta- 
bles are perfectly tender rub them through a sieve, let the soup 
boil up, and stir in one-half pint of cream, or milk, and an 
ounce of best butter. If the soup is not thick enough mix a 
little corn flour with the milk before stirring it into the soup. 
Serve with bread cut in small pieces and fried a light brown in 
butter. 

CREAM OF CHEESE SOUP 

MISS E. P. RICE 

Bring to a boil two cups of milk, two cups of white stock, and 
one onion. Strain; thicken with one tablespoon of butter and one 
tablespoon of flour rubbed together. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Add one-half cup of grated country cheese and one egg, well beaten. 
Serve at once. 

CREAM OF LETTUCE SOUP 

MISS E. P. RICE 

Wash two heads of lettuce and cook in boiling water until 
hardest part is soft. Drain and cool. Squeeze out water and 



SOUPS 



chop coarsely. Saute in one-fourth cup of butter and add one 
quart of white stock. Thicken with two tablespoons of flour and 
season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Boil five minutes and 
add one cup of thick cream. Just before serving add shredded 
lettuce. 



FISH 

FINNAN HADDIE 

MISS KATHARINE R. WENDELL 

1 finnan haddie 3^ pint of cream 

J4 pint of milk Y% teaspoon of grated onion 

1 heaping teaspoon of flour and A little paprika 

1 teaspoon of butter, braided J4 teaspoon of dry mustard 
together 1 cup of grated fresh dairy cheese 

Make the cream sauce, and when well mixed stir in the cheese. 

Flake the finnan haddie, put into the cream sauce, and let all 

come to a boil. Serve on thin toast. 
This is a delicious chafing-dish recipe. 

FINNAN HADDIE. New York Style 

S. S. B . 

Soak fish for one hour in milk and water to cover, using equal 
parts. Drain, rinse thoroughly, and separate into flakes; there 
should be two cupfuls. Cook one-fourth cup of butter with one 
tablespoon of finely chopped onion for five minutes; add one- 
fourth cup of flour, one cup each of milk and cream, a little salt, 
and one-third teaspoon of paprika. When the mixture thickens 
add the flaked fish and one-third cup of canned red peppers, cut 
in strips. Cover the bottom of a copper platter, or any baking 
dish, With cooked macaroni, pour over the fish, and set in oven for 
five minutes. Sprinkle grated cheese over the top and put platter 
under gas flame until cheese is melted. 

SALT COD FISH 

MRS. EDWARD L. YOUNG, JR. 

2 cups of picked salt fish 2 cups of potato 
2 beaten eggs Salt and pepper 

1 tablespoon of melted butter Cream and milk to moisten 
1 teaspoon of baking powder 

Mix and put in baking dish with pieces of butter on top, and 
bake until nicely browned. 

8 



FISH 



ESCALLOPED FISH 

MRS. G. E. BRIGHAM 

Boil a four or five pound haddock fifteen or twenty minutes. 
Separate fish from bones and break into very small pieces. Put 
in a double boiler one pint of milk and one whole onion. When 
milk boils take out onion ; thicken milk with scant one-half cup of 
flour wet with extra milk. When nearly done put in piece of but- 
ter the size of an egg. Cook in all about twenty minutes. When 
taken from stove add one beaten egg to sauce; cool sauce slightly 
and add one-half pint of cream; add fish, salt and pepper to taste. 
Butter baking dish well and put in layer of crumbs; then put in 
fish and put layer of crumbs, moistened with melted butter, over 
the top. Bake half an hour. 

MORUE BISCAYENNE 

C. M. R. 

1 pint of salt fish 1 cup of potatoes 

1 cup of tomato sauce 1 small onion, sliced 

2 tablespoons of butter 1 tablespoon of flour 
1 tablespoon of chopped parsley 

Cut fish and potatoes into small dice. Fry out the onion in the 
butter, add the flour, then the tomato, and when smooth add the 
fish and potato, then the parsley. Let simmer in a casserole for 
one hour or more. 



COD ROE A LA HOLLANDAISE 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Mash the roe and boil for fifteen minutes. When perfectly firm 
put on a hot dish and pour over it the following 

Dutch Sauce 

Mix a heaping tablespoon of fine flour with two tablespoons of 
cold water; stir it into one-half pint of boiling water (or liquor in 
which the roe was cooked) in a clean saucepan. Stir over the fire 
until properly thickened, then add a pinch of salt, one ounce of 
butter, broken in bits, and, when well mixed, the juice of one- 
half lemon or one teaspoon of vinegar. Stir in carefully the 



io THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

beaten yolk of one or two eggs and, having stirred quickly for 
five minutes over a slow fire, pour over the roe and serve. Parsley 
sauce may be used instead of the above. Make it the same way, 
substituting chopped parsley for eggs. 

FILLETS OF COD. "Very Good" 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Have slices nearly an inch thick cut from the middle of the fish. 
Sprinkle with pepper and salt and let stand for one hour, then 
dry in a cloth, dip in egg and then in finely sifted bread crumbs, 
with plenty of pepper and salt and a pinch of dried and sifted 
parsley. Have ready some good frying fat, boiling hot, and fry 
the fillets in a wire basket, as they require to be done quickly and 
to be covered with fat. 

FRIED FILLETS OF FISH 

MISS H. J. PEARCE 

Marinate the fillets by letting them lie in a mixture of oil, 
salt, pepper, lemon juice, and chopped parsley. Take the fillets 
from the marinade; roll them first in flour, then in egg, then in 
white bread crumbs. Fry them to a lemon color in smoking-hot 
fat. Serve with pieces of lemon or with tartar sauce. Prepare 
the fillets just before frying. Pieces of halibut may be used about 
an inch thick, but will of course take longer to cook. 

TOMATO SAUCE FOR BAKED HALIBUT 

MISS H. J. PEARCE 

Make a sauce of one pint of tomatoes, one slice of onion, one- 
half cup of water, cloves, pepper, and salt, and pour on one 
teaspoon of butter and one heaping teaspoon of flour stirred to- 
gether. Keep hot. Pour part of finished sauce on fish and bake 
half an hour. Take skin off fish, pour on rest of sauce, and serve. 

FILLETS OF HALIBUT 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

Cover fillets with French dressing and allow to stand. Drain 
and spread with well-seasoned hot mashed potatoes. Put to- 



FISH 1 1 

gether in pairs, dip in flour, egg, and crumbs, and fry in deep fat. 
Serve with the following 

Sauce 

Melt two tablespoons of butter; add two tablespoons of flour 
and one-half cup each of stock (made from fish bones) and cream. 
Boil for one minute two tablespoons of vinegar, one-half tablespoon 
of finely chopped onion, and one-half teaspoon of sugar, and add 
with one tablespoon of chopped olives. 

BOUILLABAISSE 

C. M. R. 

1 pound of boiled cod fish, cut in 1 cup of strong stock 

small pieces 1 cup of canned tomato 

1 pint of oysters 1 teaspoon of chopped parsley 

1 slice of onion 1 tablespoon of butter 

2 slices of lemon 1 tablespoon of flour 

1 glass of Sherry wine 

Put butter in deep frying pan and add onion, flour, and stock, 
then fish and soft part of oysters. Add lemon, salt, and pepper. 
Cook hard for fifteen minutes, and just before serving add parsley 
and wine. 

MOLDED SALMON 

MRS. C. L. D. YOUNKIN 

1 can of salmon ; drain, wash, flake 2 tablespoons of sugar 
Yz tablespoon each of mustard Yolks of 3 eggs 
and salt 1 cup of thin cream 

J4 cup of vinegar 

Cook until it thickens and add two-thirds tablespoon of gran- 
ulated gelatine, soaked in one-fourth cup of cold water. Mix in 
salmon and mold. Serve with the following 

Dressing 

Yl pint of cream, whipped 1 tablespoon of vinegar 

Yl teaspoon of salt A little paprika 

Mix, and fold in one cucumber, pared and chopped. 



12 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS 

MRS. WINTHROP C. DURFEE 

One pint of oysters, drained. Strain the liquor and add enough 
water to make one-half pint. Salt to a sea flavor and set where 
it will heat. Mix dry one saltspoon of pepper and one saltspoon 
of mace with a heaping half pint of finely rolled cracker crumbs. 
Melt one-half cup of butter and stir into the crumbs. Put the 
crumbs and oysters in layers in a shallow buttered baking dish, 
having crumbs on top ; pour over the liquor and bake until brown. 

VOL-AU-VENT OYSTERS 

MISS KATHARINE R. WENDELL 

1 solid quart of picked oysters 1 quart of cream 

1 bay leaf Small piece of butter 

Paprika and salt to taste 
Parboil oysters and drain in colander. Put cream in double 
boiler and add one teaspoon of grated onion. Mix with the 
butter one large dessertspoon of arrowroot, to thicken. Let all 
come to a boil and put in pastry mold. Be sure the pastry mold 
is very hot. 

DEVILED SAUCE FOR SARDINES 

MRS. H. B. CHAPIN 

Put in saucepan: 

2 tablespoons of butter 2 tablespoons of powdered mus- 
4 tablespoons of olive oil tard 

Yolks of 2 eggs 2 tablespoons of vinegar 

Pinch of salt 
Mix well over fire, beating all the time for ten minutes, when it 
will be of the consistency of Mayonnaise; then add a dash of 
boiling water, making it like thick cream. Put sardines on toast 
and pour sauce over them. 

See also recipes for Chafing Dish and Croquettes. 



MEATS 

11 A man is, in general, better pleased when he has a good dinner than when 
his wife speaks Greek." 

MARYLAND CHICKEN 

MRS. ANDREW J. PETERS 

1 chicken or a parboiled fowl 4 good-sized slices of fat bacon 

1 tablespoon of flour 1 gill of hot water 

3/2 pint of rich cream Salt and pepper to taste 

Prepare chicken cut for frying. Heat frying pan and put into it 
the bacon. When essence is all extracted add chicken, seasoned 
with salt and pepper only. When chicken is browned and done 
as it should be, remove from pan, then add hot water and sift in 
flour, stirring all the time. Add cream, pepper and salt to taste, 
and allow to boil a few minutes. Serve with the following 

Mush 

Take about one-half pint of meal and thin with water to the 
consistency of batter cakes, adding a little salt and frying brown 
on the griddle with a generous quantity of lard. The cakes should 
be put on the platter, the fried chicken laid upon them, and the 
gravy served in a gravy boat. The mush cakes and cream gravy 
may or may not be used, as desired. 

BRAISED FOWL 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Truss a fowl as for roasting. Stuff the crop with good sausage 
meat. Lay slices of bacon over the breast and put in a braising 
pan with as much good stock as will reach halfway up the legs, 
two onions, and a small bundle of sweet herbs. Let it stew very 
gently until perfectly tender, then take it up, remove bacon from 
the breast, and keep warm while removing the fat from the gravy. 
Reduce the gravy about one-half by boiling without the lid of pan. 
Brush over the breast of the fowl with good glaze ; pour the gravy 
round and serve. 

13 



14 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

DEVILED FOWL 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

The legs of either roasted or boiled fowl are suitable. Score the 
flesh deeply and coat thickly with the following 

Mixture 

Melt one ounce of butter; mix with it one teaspoon of chutney, 
a little cayenne, white pepper, and salt. Put the legs on the grid- 
iron over a slow fire, taking great care that they do not burn. 
Cook slowly for a quarter of an hour, turning them very often. 
Remove from gridiron and pour a little melted butter over each. 
If desired very hot a little cayenne should be shaken over them. 

CROQUETTES 

MRS. H. DE FOREST LOCKWOOD 

One cup of veal, chicken, halibut, or salmon. One tablespoon 
of butter and two tablespoons of flour cooked together in a sauce- 
pan. When smooth add one cup of fresh milk and one-half tea- 
spoon of salt and cook a few minutes. Then add one teaspoon of 
butter and stir until like cream. When it boils add meat. When 
cold drop from a spoon into sifted cracker crumbs and form with 
a knife into croquettes ; dip into beaten egg (two for this amount) 
and roll in cracker crumbs again, being sure that every part is 
covered or they will burst. Fry in hot lard. Can be kept several 
hours before frying. 

JAMHALAYA FOWL 

MRS. T. W. TUCKER 

1 fowl }/i pound of lean ham y% pint of rice 

1 level teaspoon of salt 1 saltspoon of pepper 

Have fowl prepared as for fricassee, put it into a stew pan, and 
add one quart of boiling water; cover and cook slowly for three 
quarters of an hour. Wash the rice, sprinkle it over the chicken, 
add the salt and the ham, chopped fine, and cover the pan, cook- 
ing slowly until the rice swells and absorbs the water, about half 
an hour. Put the chicken in the middle of the platter, covering 
carefully with the rice, and serve. 



MEATS 1 5 



CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE 

MRS. CHARLES H. SWAN 

Cut two small young chickens in pieces for serving, season with 
salt and pepper, and brush with melted butter. Bake in casserole 
dish twelve minutes. Parboil one-half cup of carrots, cut in strips ; 
drain and fry with one tablespoon of finely chopped onion and 
four thin slices of bacon, cut in narrow strips. Add one and one- 
half cups of brown sauce and two-thirds cup of potato balls. Add 
to chicken with three tablespoons of Sherry; salt and pepper to 
taste. Cook in moderate oven until chicken is tender. 

CHICKEN AND PINEAPPLE GLACE 

MISS MARGARET MORSE 

Take the breasts of young chicken and fry in butter twenty 
minutes. Slice Dole's Hawaiian pineapple in halves and fry in 
butter. Add a little chicken soup to the pan gravy and boil five 
minutes. Cut the chicken breasts in three parts and serve each 
on a half slice of pineapple in deep platter with the syrup poured 
over it. 

CHICKEN A LA GAINSBOROUGH 

MISS ELIZABETH B. COMINS 

Place the pieces of a cut fowl in a large frying pan or the bot- 
tom of a kettle ; cover with water in which is a small sliced onion, 
a number of bay leaves, and salt. Let the meat cook slowly until 
tender, about two hours. Take care that it is always covered with 
water. When tender remove the skin from all the pieces except 
the drumsticks, discarding these if an especially dainty dish is 
desired. Remove the breasts from the bones, cut them into 
large, solid pieces, and spread all the portions with butter; sprinkle 
with bread crumbs and broil until brown. Place symmetri- 
cally on a platter and pour carefully around, not over them, a 
rich brown sauce made from the water in which the fowl has 
been boiled, adding, after it is strained, a wineglass of Sherry. 
Garnish with parsley or delicate celery tips. 



1 6 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

MOLDED CHICKEN 

L. C. 

1 medium-sized can of chicken or 1 pound of cold cooked chicken 

1 cup of cold water Salt and pepper to taste 

Dissolve one tablespoon of gelatine and heat with the above in- 
gredients. Slice one hard-boiled egg and one lemon, and garnish 
mold. Put chicken into mold and chill. Serve with Mayonnaise 
Dressing or any other sauce. 

SPICED BEEF 

L. C. 

3 pounds of beef 2 quarts of water 

2 medium-sized onions 4 bay leaves 

1 tablespoon of salt 4 or 5 whole white peppers 

Boil slowly about four hours. Remove and chop meat fine in 
chopping tray. Add one teaspoon each of clove, cinnamon, mace, 
allspice, and nutmeg, a dash of pepper, three cups of the liquid, 
and salt to taste. Put into a quart mold, chill, and serve. 

BEEF LOAF 

MISS B. S. FORBES 

1 pound of raw beef and M pound 3^ teaspoon of onion salt 
of fat salt pork, put through 1 egg, well beaten 
the chopper Few grains of pepper 

1 teaspoon of salt J4 cup of bread or cracker crumbs 

J4 cup of cold water 
Mix thoroughly. Pack into small buttered bread pan and bake 

two hours in a moderate oven. 
This serves six people. 

BEEF JELLY 

Two pounds of beef, also a small piece of shin bone. Cover 
with boiling water and simmer gently for three hours. An hour 
before meat is done add one sliced onion, one bay leaf, and one- 
half teaspoon of celery seed. When meat is done set aside to cool. 
When cold chop fine. 



MEATS 17 



Cover one box of gelatine with one-half cup of cold water, let 
soak, and then add one quart of meat liquor. Beat whites of two 
eggs and add to this cold mixture. Bring the whole to boiling 
point and boil five minutes, then strain through cloth. Season 
with salt and pepper, and one lemon if desired. Cover the bottom 
of mold with slices of hard-boiled eggs, sprinkle over and around 
a little chopped parsley, put in the meat, and pour over just suffi- 
cient jelly to moisten and come to the top. Let stand over night. 

This will keep for several days. Cut in thin slices and serve 
with water cress, Bearnaise or Mayonnaise Dressing. 

ROAST BEEF AU CLAIR 

MRS. C. S. PENHALLOW 

Cut cold roast beef in thin slices and arrange on platter for 
serving. Pour over beef the following 

Dressing 

6 tablespoons of olive oil 2 tablespoons of vinegar 

1 teaspoon of salt 34 teaspoon of pepper 

Yl teaspoon of paprika 3^ teaspoon of dry mustard 

1 tablespoon each finely chopped challot, parsley, and red pepper 

Garnish with pimolas, curled celery, and lettuce. 

MEAT SOUFFLE 

MISS E. P. RICE 

Make one cup of cream sauce and season with onion and 
parsley, salt and pepper. Stir one cup of chopped meat (chicken, 
lamb, veal, or tongue) into the sauce. When hot add the beaten 
yolks of two eggs. Cook one minute and set to cool. When cool 
stir in the whites, beaten stiff, and bake in a buttered dish for 
twenty minutes. 

SWEETBREADS. As an Entree 

BARONESS VON SCHOLLEY 

Blanch two pounds of broken sweetbreads, remove the skins 
and chop fine. Add one tablespoon of chopped parsley and one 
teaspoon of onion. Soak two French rolls in very little water, 



1 8 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

squeeze dry, and pick apart, making very fine, and add to the 
sweetbreads. Cream one-fourth pound of unsalted butter, add 
yolks of five eggs, salt and pepper, and add to mixture with 
stiffly beaten whites of five eggs. Fill a well-buttered pudding 
mold, close tightly, and steam one and a half hours. Serve with 
a Hollandaise sauce. 

BRAINS 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Sheep's or calf's brains. 

Having carefully washed the brains, boil them very fast, in 
order to harden them, in well-seasoned gravy. When they are 
done remove from gravy and allow to cool. Cut them in slices or 
in halves, dip in egg, then in bread crumbs, well seasoned with 
dried and sifted parsley, pepper and salt, and fry in a little butter 
until brown. The gravy having become cold, take off the fat and 
boil in an uncovered stew pan until it is reduced to a small quan- 
tity. Pour it around the brains and serve. 

A slice of tomato, prepared as for salad, may be placed between 
or under each piece of brain, or a little pickled cucumber may be 
served in the gravy. 

LIVER PATE 

MRS. BARNUM W. FIELD 

1 calf's liver and 1 calf's tongue, 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire 
boiled hard sauce 

2 cups of melted butter Y% teaspoon of red pepper 
1 teaspoon of black pepper ~j/£ teaspoon of allspice 

3^2 teaspoon of ground clove Little chopped onion 

% nutmeg, grated 1 teaspoon of lemon juice 

Yi to 1 cup of boiling water 1 tablespoon of Brandy 

1 cup of chopped French mush- Salt, paprika, tabasco, or other 
rooms spices to taste 

Have liver grated fine and mushrooms and tongue chopped in 
very small pieces. To these add melted butter, hot water, Brandy, 
etc. The mixture will have the consistency of unbaked cake 
dough. Put in molds in a very cold place to harden, and it will 
resemble pate de foie gras and will keep some weeks if covered 
from the air. 



MEATS 19 



LIVER PATE 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

1 calf's liver, boiled until tender 1 box of mushrooms 

1 can of truffles 1 large onion, grated 

2 cups of melted butter Paprika, celery salt 

When the liver is cold, grate and add melted butter first, then 
other ingredients, stirring briskly with a wooden spoon. Fresh 
mushrooms are better than the tinned ones, but they must be 
cooked first, and a little of the water in which they are simmered 
may be added to advantage, also the liquid in the truffle can. 
When the pate is mixed it should be molded in a well-buttered 
dish and served cold. Will keep for a week in the ice chest, and 
is excellent served with lettuce as a salad. 

LIVER RECHAUFFE 

MRS. CHARLES HARRINGTON 

To about one and one-half cups of cooked liver, chopped rather 
fine, take one cup of boiling water, one-half teaspoon of mixed 
mustard, a pinch of cayenne pepper, a piece of butter the size of 
an egg, and one hard-boiled egg. Dredge the liver thickly with 
flour, pour water over it, and put on stove with other ingredients, 
excepting the egg. Let cook until thick, adding water if neces- 
sary. Add egg, chopped fine, just before serving, and a little wine. 

BEEF LOAF 

MRS. F. E. BRIDGMAN 

13^ pounds of Hamburg steak 1 cup of cracker crumbs 
1 cup of milk 1 teaspoon of salt 

Y2 teaspoon of pepper 1 teaspoon of poultry seasoning 

1 beaten egg 

Bake in buttered bread tin one and a half hours, with pan set in 
hot water. 

CHIPPED BEEF WITH TOMATO 

MRS. T. W. TUCKER 

One-half pound of chipped beef put in cold water and simmered 
a few minutes, two cups of thick tomato, one rounding tablespoon 



20 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

of butter put in a saucepan and heated, not browned. Add the 
tomato to butter, sprinkle with one rounding tablespoon of flour; 
then drain the beef and add to tomato. 

■ 

SPANISH BEEF OR TONGUE. A Calif ornia Dish 

MRS. CHARLES H. SOUTHER 

Buy a two-rib roast of beef, remove bones, roll up and tie se- 
curely with a string. Put in deep granite pan, cover with sliced 
tomatoes, pepper, and onions, and bake slowly three hours. Serve 
on platter with vegetables around. 

Tongue 

Boil a tongue and remove the skin. Cover like beef and roast 
long enough for vegetables to be well cooked. 

Beef Steak 

Take two thick slices of steak, put vegetables between, also 
tomato ketchup, and cook like beef. 

FRICANDEAU OF VEAL 

MRS. H. DE FOREST LOCKWOOD 

Take a piece of veal from the leg, loin, or cutlet piece, about 
one and one-half inches thick, and lard one side the same as for 
fillet of beef. For two pounds of meat put in a saucepan one 
ounce of butter, one-half onion and one-half carrot sliced, and 
six or eight whole pepper corns. Spread all these on bottom of pan 
and lay veal on them, larded side up. Set on a good fire for 
fifteen minutes, or until under side is well browned. Then add 
one gill of broth or stock and put in oven. Baste often and cook 
until well done. Serve with gravy strained over it. 

ROASTED STEAK. "Very Good" 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Ask the butcher, when the rump is cut out to within two or 
three pounds, to take the remainder off the bone in one piece. 
Tie the piece of meat into a neat round shape, lightly pepper, 



MEATS 21 



f 
salt, and flour it, and put m oven. Baste and turn frequently. 

It will take about one and a quarter hours. Serve with plain 

beef gravy in the dish. 

BEEFSTEAK EN CASSEROLE 

S. S. B . 

Broil about fifteen minutes a club steak weighing four pounds; 
put in a pan and spread with plenty of butter or marrow. Place 
on top one-half green pepper, cut in small pieces, a few slices of 
fresh tomatoes, or one cup of canned tomatoes, and cook in oven 
about fifteen minutes. Season with salt and pepper, remove to 
hot platter, and arrange around it a border consisting of fried 
potato balls, sauted fresh mushrooms, small fried onions, and, if 
desired, other vegetables (carrots cut into dice and cooked string 
beans or peas) . Add to steak gravy one tablespoon of Worcester- 
shire sauce, two tablespoons of catsup, two tablespoons of Sherry 
wine, a little chopped celery and parsley, and pour over steak. 

BAKED TONGUE 

MRS. CHARLES HARRINGTON 

Boil a fresh tongue until tender, skin, and set away to cool in 
the same water. Take out and put in baking dish and bake until 
brown, about half an hour, basting with the following 

Sauce 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of vinegar 

2 dozen cloves 1 lemon, cut fine 

1 cup of raisins, chopped fine 

Serve with sauce around tongue. 

COTTAGE PIE 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Cut into dice one and one-half pounds of any coarse lean part 
of beef (from the sticking piece is best) and put it into a stew pan 
with one ounce of butter, a pinch of pepper and salt, and four 
minced onions. Let this simmer in its own juices until perfectly 



22 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

tender. If not allowed to cook too fast there will be nearly one- 
half pint of gravy from fine fresh meat. It will take nearly two 
hours to cook properly. When ready, put the meat and onions 
into a pie dish, mix the gravy with sufficient plain butter sauce 
to fill the dish, and cover it with nicely mashed potatoes. Mark 
the cover on top by crossing in squares with a knife. Bake for 
twenty minutes. The potato crust should be nicely browned. 
A little milk or butter should be mixed with the potatoes. This 
pie may also be made of cold meat and will not require stewing. 

A BAKED STEW 

MRS. NATHANIEL WALES 

Left-over lamb is the best for this. Cut the lamb in cubes; add 
one cup of cooked rice, one-half can of tomatoes, potatoes, onions, 
salt and pepper. Put in a casserole, or any deep dish that has a 
tight cover, with plenty of hot water and bake about one and a 
half hours in a slow oven. The time depends on the quantity. 
Serve in same dish. 

Water may have to be added when partly baked. 

GARNISHED LAMB CHOPS 

BARONESS VON SCHOLLEY 

Garnishing 

Melt one ounce of butter and saute in it two finely minced 
onions and one tablespoon of fine parsley; add two tablespoons of 
minced mushrooms, one tablespoon of grated Parmesan cheese, 
and one-fourth cup of white sauce. If too thick add a little mush- 
room liquor. Season with salt and pepper and boil up once, then 
put away to cool. 

Pare and flatten twelve lamb chops; season each with salt and 
pepper and brush with olive oil. Broil, or cook them in a sautoire 
for two minutes, on one side only. Divide garnishing into twelve 
parts and spread evenly over cooked side of chops; sprinkle with 
fresh bread crumbs and grated Parmesan cheese and pour a little 
melted butter over each. Lay them carefully in a well-buttered 



MEATS 23 



roasting pan and place in a very hot oven for five minutes, or 
until of a good color. Serve with a pint of hot tomato sauce. 

BONED SHOULDER OF LAMB 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Saw off the shank and carefully remove the blade-bone of the 
shoulder; chop a few mushrooms, previously stewed in butter, 
and put them in the cavity. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and 
roll the shoulder up tightly, securing it with string. Roast, and 
when done serve with mushrooms, stewed either in butter or 
gravy. 

SHOULDER OF LAMB 

MRS. B. W. MUNROE 

Put the shoulder into a deep iron pan, slice three or four onions 
over it, and put into the oven. Baste it after it is brown. A 
quarter of an hour before serving, turn in one tablespoon of Soy, 
three tablespoons of tomato catsup, and one-half cup of wine. 

Should the gravy not be thick enough, add flour with the wine 
and boil up well. 

The time depends on the size of the shoulder. 

In season use fresh tomatoes boiled and strained over it. A 
shoulder of veal is also excellent. 

HAMPTON LAMB 

" PLYMOUTH." MRS. B. W. MUNROE 

2 large cups of lamb, cut in dice 1 large cup of bread crumbs 
Y2 pint of cream (less will do 1 tablespoon of chopped capers 
with a little milk) 1 tablespoon of butter, or not, 

1 tablespoon of jelly as desired 

J/2 saltspoon of cayenne, or less 

Stir all together and cook, then put in the lamb just long enough 
to heat. 

LAMB TERRAPIN 

MISS SUSAN L. MERRIAM 

Melt two tablespoons of butter, add two tablespoons of flour, 
the mashed yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, one teaspoon of mus- 



24 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

tard, one tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce, one-half teaspoon 
of salt, and one cup of stock. When boiling add one and one-half 
cups of lamb, cut in small pieces, and the whites of the two eggs, 
finely chopped. Season with Sherry. 

MOCK TERRAPIN 

MISS ROSAMOND HILL SMITH 

13^2 cups of cold cooked chicken Yolks and whites of 2 hard- 

or veal, chopped into dice boiled eggs, finely chopped 

1 cup of white sauce 3 tablespoons of Sherry wine 

J4 teaspoon of salt Cayenne pepper 

Add chicken, eggs, salt, etc., to sauce and cook two minutes. 
Add wine. Put on platter and serve. 

HASHED LAMB WITH ENGLISH WALNUTS 

MRS. EDWARD L. YOUNG, JR. 

To one pint of cold chopped lamb add one cup of cold boiled 
potatoes, diced, and one-half cup of chopped English walnuts. 
Heat in one pint of cream sauce, made with four tablespoons each 
of butter and flour and two cups of brown stock or milk. Season 
with salt and pepper and add two tablespoons of chopped parsley. 

BELGIAN ROAST 

MRS. CHARLES HARRINGTON 

1 pound of veal, 1 pound of beef, 1 cup of crumbs 
and 1 pound of fresh pork, all 1 cup of Cold water 
put twice through the chopper 1 level tablespoon of salt 

3 eggs Y% teaspoon of pepper 

1 small onion, chopped 

Form into a loaf and roast one and a quarter hours, covered 
with strips of salt pork. Serve with the following 

Gravy 

Two tablespoons of butter, browned, two tablespoons of flour, 
one-half pint of stock or water, one teaspoon of salt, and a little 
pepper. 



MEATS 25 



MELTON VEAL 

MRS. GEORGE HARRINGTON 

2 pounds of lean veal, cut while 1 slice of ham, boiled and 
raw into small pieces chopped fine 

Line a quart bowl with slices of hard-boiled eggs. Mix two tea- 
spoons of salt, one teaspoon of pepper, one teaspoon of sweet 
marjoram, and one-half teaspoon of sage. Put in bowl a layer of 
each kind of meat, sprinkling with seasonings and adding a few 
bits of sliced lemon with the veal, until the dish is full. Cover 
with a plate and steam four hours, then put a flatiron on plate 
and put away to stand over night. Turn out and serve. 

FORCEMEAT RISSOLES 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Roll out some puff paste (one-fourth pound will make a good 
many rissoles) to one-fourth inch thickness. Cut in rounds with 
a paste cutter or the top of a cup. Pound sausage meat in a mor- 
tar and put a teaspoonful on each paste round; wet the edges 
and fold over to the shape of a puff, press well together, and mark 
with a paste cutter. Fry them in hot fat, garnish with fried pars- 
ley, and serve in a napkin. 

RICE CASE WITH FORCEMEAT 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Boil one-half pound of Carolina rice in a quart of water with 
one ounce of bacon fat or butter; pepper and salt to taste. When 
it is done and dry enough pound it in a mortar, then roll into a 
ball, put it on a baking sheet, and mold it with the hands into 
the shape of a raised pie. Brush it over with melted butter, and 
bake in the oven until it colors nicely. Put into it as many fried 
sausage balls as it will contain, and pour over them a thick brown 
gravy. 

BONELESS HAM 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

Put ham to soak in cold water for eighteen hours. Pour off water 
and cover again with cold water and a quart of milk. Soak about 



26 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

six hours and put on fire in same liquor. Boil slowly about six 
hours, or until the bone will twist out. Remove bone and skin, 
sprinkle with sugar, add whole cloves, tie with string if necessary, 
and bake one hour. Slice when cold. 

HAM TIMBALES 

MRS. ARTHUR N. BROUGHTON 

1 cup of stale bread crumbs 1 cup of milk 

4 tablespoons of butter 1 cup of chopped ham 

}/$ teaspoon of pepper 3^ teaspoon of salt 

Whites of 2 eggs 2 hard-boiled eggs 

Cook bread crumbs and milk until smooth; add butter, ham, 
salt, and pepper; then fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Fill but- 
tered individual molds two-thirds full, set in pan of hot water, 
and bake until firm, about twenty minutes. Garnish with parsley 
and hard-boiled eggs. 

HAM CANAPES 

MRS. ARTHUR N. BROUGHTON 

Cut six slices of bread with a circular cutter and toast to a golden 
brown. Place on a platter with a slice of cooked ham and a dropped 
egg on each. 

BAKED HAM 

MRS. H. O. HOFMAN 

Put one slice of ham in a baking dish ; cover all except fat with 
a paste made of one heaping teaspoon of mustard, one-half cup 
of flour, and water to mix. Then put in the dish milk enough to 
come nearly to the top of the ham and bake one hour. 

VEAL CUTLETS WITH WHITE GRAVY 

MRS. H. B. CHAPIN 

Cut sliced veal into cutlets and dip each piece in fine cracker 
crumbs and then in egg. Fry brown some slices of pork. Take 
out the pieces and add one tablespoon of nice lard. When very 
hot put in the veal and cook thoroughly an even light brown. 
Put in dish. Add to the fat in the pan a little dust of flour, salt 



MEATS 2 7 



and pepper, a little boiling water, and enough cream to make it a 
smooth rich consistency. Stir constantly while cooking and pour 
over cutlets. A little wine may be added. 

POTTED PIGEONS 

MISS E. P. RICE 

Stuff the pigeons with a nice dressing, made with onion, clove, 
bread, etc. Try out a little salt pork, put the pigeons in the hot 
fat, and fry to a brown. Take out, put into a kettle with enough 
water to cover them, and let them simmer three hours. Take 
out, thicken gravy, and add Sherry wine. 

See also Chqfing-Dish Recipes. 



VEGETABLES 
SPAGHETTI A L'lTALIENNE 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Bring water to a boil in a large pot, with salt to taste, and put 
in the spaghetti gently without breaking. Boil with occasional 
stirring until raw taste disappears, about twelve or fourteen 
minutes. Strain and serve at once with grated Roman or Par- 
mesan cheese and tomato sauce. 

SOUTHERN SWEET POTATOES 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Boil until tender six good-sized sweet potatoes. Peel and mash 
in a hot basin; season with salt, two tablespoons of butter, and two 
tablespoons of white sugar. Beat very light with a fork, pour 
into baking dish, smooth, and spread a little butter on top and 
bake fifteen minutes in a hot oven. 

CANDIED SWEET POTATOES 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Boil sweet potatoes without peeling. When soft enough for a 
fork to penetrate them easily, take from water, skin, and cut into 
medium thick slices, putting a layer in a well-buttered baking 
dish and covering thickly with light-brown sugar dotted with 
small bits of butter. Repeat the layers until all the potatoes are 
used, having sugar and butter on top. Put in a hot oven until 
sugar and butter melt together and the top is a delicate brown. 

BEETS 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Make a sauce of two tablespoons of sugar, one tablespoon of 
butter, one saltspoon of mustard, one egg, and one-half teaspoon 
of vinegar. Add six beets, boiled tender and chopped rather fine. 
Beat all together and heat until creamy.' 

28 



VEGETABLES 29 

JAPANESE RICE 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Wash one cup of rice thoroughly and put over fire with five cups 
of fast-boiling water. Add salt, and when it has boiled fast for 
fifteen minutes set the saucepan, uncovered, in a moderate oven. 
In fifteen minutes the water will have completely evaporated and 
every grain will be distinct and fluffy. 

A DIFFERENT WAY OF BAKING BEANS 

MRS. NATHANIEL WALES 

Two cups of medium-sized pea beans, soaked over night. In 
the morning put in fresh water with a little salt and boil until 
very soft, almost mushy. There should be enough water, to begin 
with, not to have to add any, but the beans must be very moist 
when boiled. Try out eight or ten slices of salt pork in a spider, 
put the beans into the pork fat, and put in a moderately hot oven 
until a crispy brown on top. Serve on platter, taking out carefully, 
so that crispy part is up. Garnish with the crisp pieces of pork. 
When reheated for the following day sprinkle with a little water 
and put in oven. 

CARAMELED CARROTS 

MISS ROSAMOND HILL SMITH 

Cut one or two large carrots into very thin pieces, about two 
inches long. Put them into a saucepan, sprinkle well with sugar, 
and add one good tablespoon of butter. Pour on water enough 
to cover them and let them simmer until all but one tablespoon 
of the water has boiled away. Then sift a little flour over them 
and stir until it is all absorbed. This requires about two hours 
for cooking the carrots. 

TOMATO CROUTES 

MRS. A. N. BROUGHTON 

Scald and peel small tomatoes, then cut a slice from the stem 
end. Place them, the cut side down, on slices of buttered bread, 
put them in a buttered baking tin, season with salt and pepper, 
and bake half an hour. Serve with cold roast beef. 



3© THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

CORN PUDDING. Served as a Vegetable 

MRS. WINTHROP C. DURFEE 

1 can of corn, chopped, or an 1 teaspoon of salt 

equal amount of fresh corn 1 pint of milk 
1 heaping tablespoon of butter 1 teaspoon of sugar 
1 teaspoon of flour 2 eggs, beaten 

}/i teaspoon of pepper 

Bake in a shallow buttered pan for twenty minutes. 
BAKED STUFFED CUCUMBERS. "Very good" 

MRS. WILLIAM F. HASTINGS 

Wipe and peel cucumbers, cut in two-inch pieces, crosswise, re- 
moving the seeds. Mix four tablespoons of bread crumbs and two 
tablespoons of grated cheese, moisten with tomato sauce, and sea- 
son with salt, pepper, and cayenne. Put cucumber cups in shallow 
pans, fill with mixture, surround with chicken stock, and bake 
thirty minutes. Remove, cover with buttered bread crumbs, and 
bake again until crumbs brown. 

TOMATOES WITH CHEESE 

MISS KATHARINE R. WENDELL 

Cut pieces of bread round, like cookies, and fry in batter a light 
brown. Slice firm ripe tomatoes and broil slightly; then put a 
piece on bread, season with pepper and salt, and scatter Parmesan 
cheese over them and a layer of fine bread crumbs moistened with 
melted butter. Brown in a hot oven and serve piping hot. 

STUFFED MUSHROOMS 

MR. W. CLIFTON JONES 

Chop one shallot and saute in one-half tablespoon of butter. 
Remove the insides of mushrooms, chop with half the stalks, and 
add to the shallot; add a glass of white wine and a little good 
broth. (Steep the remaining stalks in one^-third cup of water for 
mushroom broth or gravy.) Cook for half an hour, then season 
with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Add chopped parsley, butter, 



VEGETABLES 3 1 

yolks of two eggs, fresh crumbs , and a little lemon juice. Fill the 
mushrooms, place in a well-buttered pan, and bake thirty minutes. 
Moisten with the gravy and garnish with parsley. 

Recipe of Somerset Club Chef de Cuisine 

MUSHROOMS A LA MIEUSSET 

MR. W. CLIFTON JONES 

Peel and wash one-half pound of mushrooms and place on but- 
tered toast in a baking dish with a glass cover. Mix two ounces 
of butter with chopped parsley; add four drops of lemon juice, salt 
and pepper. Fill the mushrooms with the mixture and pour a 
glass of sweet cream over them. Bake twenty-five minutes. If 
too dry when cooked add more cream. 

Recipe of Somerset Club Chef 

FRIED TOMATOES 

MRS. JOSEPH WILLIAMS 

Cut tomatoes in halves, sprinkle with salt, cayenne, and one 
teaspoon of sugar, and fry in butter, turning both sides. Remove 
tomatoes, add one-half cup of cream, thicken with flour, and add 
a little Sherry. Pour over tomatoes and serve. 

GREEN PEPPERS 

MRS. CHANNING WILLIAMS 

Cut sweet green peppers in thin slices and boil ten minutes. 
Brown butter in a frying pan and cook the peppers in this until 
tender. Little or no seasoning will be necessary. 

STUFFED PEPPERS 

MRS. A. J. PETERS 

Cut off the stem end of green or red peppers, remove seeds, and 
parboil for a few minutes. Stuff with creamed sweetbreads and 
mushrooms and serve hot. 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 

HOW TO MIX A SALAD. A Recipe in Rhyme 

REV. SIDNEY SMITH ' 

" Two large potatoes passed thro' kitchen sieve 
Smoothness and softness to the salad give; 
Of mordant mustard add a single spoon — 
Distrust the condiment that bites too soon; 
But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault 
To add a double quantity of salt. 
Four times the spoon with oil of olives crown, 
And twice with vinegar procured from town; 
True flavour needs it and your poet begs 
The pounded yellow of two well boiled eggs. 
Let onions' atoms lurk within the bowl, 
And scarce suspected animate the whole: 
And, lastly, on the flavour'd compound toss 
A magic spoonful of anchovy sauce. 
Oh ! great and glorious and herbaceous treat, 
'T would tempt the dying anchorite to eat, 
Back to the world he 'd turn his weary soul 
And plunge his ringers in the salad bowl." 

SALAD DRESSING 

MISS EMILY KNIGHT 

1 teaspoon of mustard Yolks of 3 eggs 

Y2 teaspoon of salt Juice of 1 lemon, to be added 

Pinch of cayenne last 

Add oil slowly, stirring always in one direction, until thick. 
Thin with vinegar. 

CREAM SALAD DRESSING 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

Beat one egg thoroughly. Mix one-half tablespoon of mixed 
mustard, a little salt, paprika, red pepper, butter the size of an 

32 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 33 

egg, and one and one-half tablespoons of vinegar and add to the 
egg. Put in saucepan over teakettle and stir until like soft cus- 
tard. Cool, and when ready to serve add one-half pint of whipped 
cream. 

Delicious on salad made of Taka pears and English walnuts. 

ROQUEFORT CHEESE SALAD DRESSING 

MISS LAURA KELSEY 

}4 teaspoon of salt, covered with 3^ teaspoon of sugar 

pepper 2 dessertspoons of Heinz' tomato 

Roquefort cheese, size of an egg catsup 

6 tablespoons of salad oil 2 tablespoons of vinegar 

Mix the salt, pepper, sugar, and oil together and rub in cheese 
thoroughly until smooth. Add catsup and then vinegar and beat 
with egg beater. Pour over lettuce leaves. 

This amount is enough for a medium-sized head of lettuce. 

DRESSING FOR COLD SLAW 

MRS. WILLIAM D. HOWLAND 

Yolks of 3 eggs, beaten 1 teaspoon of mustard 

2 teaspoons of salt 34 saltspoon of cayenne 

2 tablespoons of sugar 2 tablespoons of oil 

1 cup of milk }/2 cup of hot vinegar 

Whites of 3 eggs, beaten stiff 

Cook in double boiler seven or eight minutes, until it is of right 
consistency. 

DRESSING FOR CABBAGE SALAD 

MISS S. L. EDWARDS 

2 eggs, well beaten 1 tablespoon of mustard 
1 teaspoon of black pepper 2 teaspoons of salt 

3 tablespoons of melted butter 6 tablespoons of cream 

1 cup of vinegar 

Set on stove and stir until it thickens like custard. 
This is for half a medium-sized cabbage. 



34 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

DRESSING FOR CABBAGE SALAD 

MRS. HENRY B. CHAPIN 

Y2 cup of butter J/£ cup of sugar 

Yl cup of cream 1 tablespoon of dry mustard 

Yolks and whites of 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon of salt, pepper 
beaten separately 

Beat all together, then add one-half cup of vinegar, and cook 
like custard in a double boiler. 

WHIPPED CREAM DRESSING 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Chill and whip one-half pint of cream until stiff. Add gradually 
three tablespoons of lemon juice, one teaspoon of salt, one salt- 
spoon each of paprika and black pepper, and three tablespoons of 
grated horse radish. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING, Which Never Separates 

MRS. EDWARD B. LANE 

Yolks of 3 eggs V/2 pints of olive oil 

2 tablespoons of tarragon vinegar 1 tablespoon of salt 

1 teaspoon of powdered sugar 1 tablespoon of lemon juice 

Small pinch of red pepper 1 tablespoon of hot water 

Add about a tablespoon of the oil to the egg yolks and beat, 
then add the remainder of the oil and all the vinegar, and beat 
together. Add the salt, sugar, lemon juice, and pepper, and 
finally the hot water. This can be made in five minutes. 

FRUIT SALAD DRESSING 

M. C. L. 

4 egg yolks or 2 whole eggs 4 tablespoons of vinegar 

1 tablespoon of sugar Y teaspoon of mustard 

Salt, paprika Butter the size of a walnut 

Cook in double boiler until thick. When cold add three-fourths 
of a cup of cream, stiffly whipped. A little " Marshmallow 
Cream " may be added if desired. 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 35 

RUSSIAN SAUCE 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

M cup of Mayonnaise 3 tablespoons of chili sauce 

2 tablespoons of pimentos, cut 1 tablespoon of tarragon vinegar 

small 1 teaspoon of chives, chopped fine 

M teaspoon of Escoffier Diable Enough dried tarragon leaves to 

sauce * taste, finely pounded 

RUSSIAN SALAD DRESSING 

MISS J. L. BARRY 

1 cup of Mayonnaise Dressing 1 teaspoon of pimentos, chopped 
1 teaspoon of green peppers, fine 

chopped fine 3^2 teaspoon of paprika 

1 teaspoon of tarragon vinegar 3^ cup of olive oil 

34 teaspoon of salt 3^ cup of chili sauce 

Prepare the Mayonnaise in the usual way ; then to a cup of the 
dressing gradually beat in an extra half cup of oil, then the chili 
sauce, seasonings, vinegar, peppers, and pimentos. 

COPLEY SALAD DRESSING 

S. S. B . 

6 tablespoons of Mayonnaise 2 tablespoons of Escoffier Diable 

Dressing sauce 1 

1 tablespoon of chili sauce A very little chopped chives 

FROZEN FRUIT SALAD 

M. C. L. 

Cut up a variety of fruits and pack into a one-pound baking 
powder tin, reserving the juice. To the juice add sugar and a 
little gelatine. Pour this into the can of fruit. Pack can in ice 
and salt for two hours, taking it out fifteen minutes before serving. 
To serve, slice the roll of fruit and place the slices on lettuce 
leaves with Fruit Salad Dressing. 

1 Escoffier Diable sauce is to be had at S. S. Pierce's. 



36 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

FRUIT SALAD 

M. C. L. 

Cut up five oranges, one banana, one cup of pineapple, one- 
fourth pound of white grapes, seeded and skinned, or one cup of 
cherries, stoned, six or eight marshmallows, cut into fine pieces. 
Serve on lettuce with shredded almonds and Fruit Salad Dressing. 

NECTAR SALAD 

MRS. JOHN B. R. LYONS 

10 cents' worth of marshmal- 5 slices of pineapple, cut the same 
lows, cut in small pieces with 1 pound of white grapes, seeded 
scissors and cut 

}/2 cup of pecan nuts chopped 

Mix these together and pour over the following 

Dressing 

Yolks of 3 eggs Juice of 2 lemons Y% cup of milk 

Mix lemon and eggs with egg beater, then add milk, and cook 
in double boiler. 

Serve on lettuce leaves. Enough for twelve persons. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD 

MRS. CHARLES F. DOLE 

Drain the sliced pineapple, cut in cubes with silver fork, and 
dress with Mayonnaise on lettuce leaves. 

The juice may be made into a delicious jelly by proceeding as 
for any plain jelly. — a. d. weld. 

JELLY CELERY SALAD 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Soak two tablespoons of gelatine in two-thirds cup of cold water 
and dissolve by adding one cup of boiling water. Add five table- 
spoons of lemon juice, one-fourth cup of sugar, one-half table- 
spoon of fresh grated horse-radish root, pepper and cayenne to 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 37 

taste. Color a light green, and when mixture begins to thicken 
add one cup of finely chopped celery. Mold, chill, and serve on 
lettuce with Russian Sauce. 

FRUIT SALAD 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Boil four tablespoons of water and eight tablespoons of sugar 
until it drops thick; pour this over the white of one egg, beaten 
stiff and flavored with lemon. Have bananas and oranges sliced, 
and while the dressing is hot pour it over the fruit. 

ORANGE SALAD 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Make a dressing of equal parts of brandy, tarragon vinegar, 
and olive oil, seasoned with pepper and salt, and pour over sliced 
oranges. 

CELERY SALAD 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Cut celery into inch-long pieces, squeeze a little lemon juice 
over it, and let stand a few minutes before putting into salad 
bowl. After it is in the bowl, cover with green Mayonnaise and 
sprinkle some grated Parmesan cheese over top. 

TOMATO AND CHICKEN SALAD 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Remove skins of tomatoes by pouring boiling water over them, 
and dip into iced water to harden. Then cut a piece out of the 
stem end, remove seeds from inside, and fill with chicken salad. 
Place on a bed of lettuce leaves. 

APPLE AND CUMQUAT SALAD 

MRS. CLIFFORD DEVENS 

Cut apples and cumquats in very small pieces, cover with a 
French dressing made with lemon juice, mix gently, and serve on 
lettuce. 



38 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

DELICIOUS BANANA SALAD 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Take short thick bananas, either red or yellow, and turn back 
a strip of the peel and scoop out the pulp. Then fill the space with 
a mixture of thinly sliced banana, shredded orange or grape 
fruit, white grapes, and a few kernels of English walnuts or pecans 
in small pieces. In season, stoned cherries may be added. Mix 
with a generous supply of dressing and fill the cases, putting each 
one on lettuce leaves. These cannot stand iong. 

CONTINENTAL SALAD 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Take small smooth tomatoes, cut from center of top down 
through the skin and thick part nearly to the stem, dividing into 
six equal parts ; then cut each of these points halfway down away 
from center, leaving that like a ball of juicy pulp and seeds with 
the points opening out like petals. Arrange two or three lettuce 
leaves in a circle. Spread two tablespoons of Whipped Cream 
Dressing in the middle, lay a tomato on the cream, and put a 
triangle of cucumbers between the petals. Mayonnaise or French 
dressing is good if preferred. 

SHREDDED WHEAT SALAD 

MRS. CHARLES H. SOUTHER 

Soak as many halves of shredded wheat as desired, in good 
rich milk, and brown in oven. When cool and ready to serve place 
two or three slices of ripe tomato on top, overlapping each other. 
Cover with Mayonnaise and serve on water cress. 

SAVORY TAPIOCA. To Serve with Salads 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Put two ounces of tapioca into a slow oven with one pint of stock 
and let it swell for an hour; then mix with it two onions, boiled 
and rubbed to a puree, and one-half pint of any kind of soup or 
gravy. Let it bake slowly for one hour. Serve with pieces of fried 
bread placed around dish. 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 39 

CABBAGE SALAD 

MISS BREWER 

Remove outside leaves of cabbage. Cut out center and chop. 
Mix equal parts of cabbage, apple, and celery, the last two cut 
fine ; moisten with Mayonnaise Dressing and place in the cabbage 
shell. Slit the shell and place in the slits quarters of red apples, 
skin-side out. 

SALAD FRANCONIA 

MRS. ARTHUR N. BROUGHTON 

Cover green peppers with ice water after removing seeds, and 
chill. Drain and wipe as dry as possible. Fill with cream cheese, 
mashed and moistened with cream. Arrange lettuce leaves in 
salad bowl and put on the leaves small slices of canned pineapple, 
and on the pineapple the pepper, cut in one-third-inch slices. 
Serve with French dressing. 

CORN SALAD 

MRS. B. W. FIELD 

18 ears of sweet corn, cut from cob 4 medium-sized onions, 3 red 
J^ cup of salt peppers, 1 small white cab- 

2 cups of sugar bage, all chopped fine 

Y% pound of ground mustard 1 quart of cider vinegar 

Mix and cook for twenty minutes. Seal in jars. Serve on let- 
tuce leaves. 

TOMATOES IN ASPIC 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

From the stem end of small round tomatoes scoop out a bit of 
the fruit and fill with Mayonnaise Dressing and chopped hard- 
boiled egg. Do not let the filling stand out beyond the fruit. Put 
small molds or cups on ice and pour in one-eighth inch of clear 
aspic jelly. When set place a tomato in each, the filled side upper- 
most, and pour more jelly around and over it. Ice well, then turn 
onto a dish, garnish with lettuce or water cress, and serve with 
Mayonnaise Dressing. 



40 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

TOMATO JELLY 

C. H. 

To make tomato jelly, put ripe tomatoes into a saucepan and 
simmer gently until they are reduced to a pulp, stirring all the 
time. Strain through a fine sieve, warm the juice, and add to each 
pint one-half pound of fine sugar and the juice of one-half lemon. 
Boil all together until it jells. 

TOMATO JELLY 

MRS. A. F. NAZRO 

Set three-fourths box of gelatine to soak in one-half cup of cold 
water. Cook for ten minutes one can of tomatoes, one-half onion, 
one stalk of celery, one bay leaf, two cloves, one teaspoon of salt, 
and a dash of paprika. Add two tablespoons of tarragon vinegar 
and the gelatine. Stir until dissolved. Strain and turn into small 
cups or molds. Serve on lettuce with Mayonnaise. 



EGGS AND CHEESE 

" The turnpike road to people's hearts I find 
Lies through their mouths, 
Or I mistake mankind." 

— Dr. Walcot. 

MIXED CHEESE 

MRS. C. E. KENDRICK 

1 cream cheese 1 hard-boiled egg 

Yi bottle of stuffed olives, chopped 3^2 cup of chopped nuts 

Salt and paprika 
Serve with crackers. 

CHEESE BALLS. To Serve with Salad 

MRS. ARTHUR N. BROUGHTON 

Mash one cream cheese, moisten with orange juice, adding a 
few drops at a time. Form into balls and roll in grated orange 
rind. Serve on small toasted crackers and garnish with cress. 

REAL SWEDISH CHEESE 

MRS. CHARLES F. DOLE 

1 quart of sweet milk 1 quart of sour milk 

2 tablespoons of sugar Pinch of salt 

Heat sweet milk to boiling point, add sour milk, and let it 
stand until the whey comes. Take out part of whey and boil 
slowly until all the whey is boiled away. 

CHEESE CROQUETTES. " Extra Good " 

MISS H. J. PEARCE 

Yl pound of cheese 3^ teaspoon of salt 

1 scant tablespoon of butter 1 tablespoon of milk 

1 egg, beaten enough to break it Dash of paprika 

Mix to a smooth paste and mold into small croquettes (eight 
in all). Add a little milk to the yolk of one egg and roll the cro- 

4i 



42 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

quettes in this and then in cracker dust. Fry for one minute in 
smoking-hot fat and serve immediately. 

ROMAN GNOCCHI 

M. C. L. 

Yz cup of cream of wheat }/i cup of butter 

2 egg yolks 2 cups of milk 

% cup of cheese 

Cook the cream of wheat with the milk, butter, and a little salt 
for half an hour in a double boiler. Stir in the egg yolks and half 
the cheese and cook a few minutes. Pour into shallow buttered 
dish. When cool sprinkle with remaining cheese, grated, and 
brown in the oven. 

CHEESE TOAST 

MISS ROSAMOND HILL SMITH 

2 tablespoons of butter 2 teaspoons of cornstarch 

1 cup of thin cream Salt, pepper, cayenne, and mus- 

% cup of grated American cheese tard to taste 

Melt the butter in a frying pan and add the cornstarch, salt, 
pepper, and mustard, then the cream, stirring carefully all the 
time. Add cheese last, when all is smooth and well mixed, and 
stir until it is thick and creamy. Serve poured over thin pieces 
of hot toast. 

This recipe is also delicious as a* sauce poured over eggs dropped 
on toast. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE 

C. M. R. 

Make a cream sauce with one heaping tablespoon of butter, one 
heaping tablespoon of flour, one cup of milk, slightly warmed, 
one-half teaspoon of salt, a few grains of paprika or cayenne. Re- 
move from fire and add one cup of grated cheese and the yolks of 
three eggs, not beaten, but stirred into the mixture. When cool 
add the whites of three eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Bake fifteen 
minutes in a moderate oven and serve immediately. 

Use plain mild American cheese. If soft enough put it through 
the masher; if dry, grate it. 



EGGS AND CHEESE 43 



WELSH RABBIT 

MISS ISABELLE H. EARNSHAW 

Melt two tablespoons of butter and add one level teaspoon of 
salt, one level teaspoon of mustard, and one level teaspoon of corn- 
starch. Add gradually one cup of cream and lastly one pound of 
cheese, ground in the meat chopper. Add a little paprika. 

CHEESE FONDUE 

MRS. ARTHUR N. BROUGHTON 

Beat together five eggs until light and add one cup of grated 
Swiss or mild cheese, one-half teaspoon of white pepper, and three 
tablespoons of butter, cut into bits. Cook in a double boiler 
until cheese is melted and the mixture is smooth. Pour over 
hot buttered toast and serve at once. 

CHEESE FONDUE 

MRS. E. H. PORTER 

Soak one cup of fine bread crumbs in two scant cups of milk; 
beat three eggs ; add to milk with one tablespoon of melted butter, 
one level teaspoon of salt, one-fourth teaspoon of pepper, and lastly 
one-half pound of mild cheese, grated. Pour into a pudding dish 
and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Bake in a quick oven until brown 
and serve at once. 

CHEESE STRAWS 

MISS SCHIRMER 

1 cup of grated cheese 1 cup of flour 

2 tablespoons of butter Cold water 

Mix together and add enough cold water to roll very thin. Cut 
in narrow strips about four inches long and bake a light brown in 
shallow buttered pans. 

CHEESE DISH 

MRS. CHARLES HARRINGTON 

One tablespoon of butter, melted in double boiler. Add one 
cup of cut cheese and, when melted, one cup of bread crumbs pre- 



44 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

viously soaked in one cup of milk. Stir well; add salt, pepper, 
and lastly one beaten egg. Serve on slices of toast or crackers. 

SAVORY CHEESE 

MRS. CHARLES S. PENHALLOW 

34 pound of Roquefort, and one 1 tablespoon of finely chopped 
cream cheese, put through the onion or chives 
ricer 1 tablespoon of parsley 

2 tablespoons of olive oil 1 pimento, put through sieve 

34 teaspoon of salt 

Mold in patty pan and chill. 



CRACKER AND CHEESE SOUFFLE 

E. G. W. 

Cover the bottom of a baking dish with split cooking crackers, 
well buttered; grate American cheese over them and season well 
with salt, pepper, and a little cayenne. Repeat layers of but- 
tered crackers, cheese, and seasonings until dish is nearly full; 
then pour milk over the whole, letting it soak in well. Bake 
about twenty minutes. This puffs way up and should be served 
immediately. 

An egg may be added with the milk if desired. 



EGGS AU GRATIN 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

4 hard-boiled eggs 3^ CU P of milk 

1 tablespoon of butter ^ teaspoon of salt 

1)^ tablespoons of flour f/g cup of white stock 

% cup of buttered cracker crumbs Grated cheese 

Few grains of cayenne 

Make a sauce of the butter, flour, stock, and milk ; add eggs, 
finely chopped, salt, and cayenne. Fill buttered ramekin dishes 
with tjie mixture, sprinkle with grated cheese, cover with cracker 
crumbs, and bake in a moderate oven until crumbs are brown. . 



EGGS AND CHEESE 45 



SWISS EGGS 

S. G. C. 

6 eggs 34 pound of cheese 

1 cup of rich milk 2 tablespoons of butter 

1 saltspoon of mustard Pinch of cayenne pepper 

Grate the cheese and mix with other ingredients, reserving 
enough to scatter over the top. Bake in quick oven in one large 
dish or in individual dishes. 

SPANISH OMELET 

C. M. R. 

2 small onions 4 tomatoes 

1 teaspoon of sugar 1 saltspoon of salt 

3^2 cup of strong stock (beef juice) 2 tablespoons of butter 

2 small teaspoons of flour 1 jar of mushrooms (cut the 

mushrooms if large) 

Put on frying pan, and when hot put in the butter. Add the 
flour, then the onions, cut in fine slices, the sugar, tomatoes, stock, 
and mushrooms. Make a plain omelet and put this filling on it, 
double over, and serve. 

EGGS A LA MARTIN 

C. M. R. 

1 cup of Gruyere cheese, grated 1 pint of cream sauce, not too 

stiff 

Add cheese when a little cool. Beat the whites of as many eggs 
as desired until stiff, then stir into cream sauce, and pour into pie 
dish. Drop yolks carefully (so as not to break) into mixture and 
bake in a quick oven until brown. Eggs should not be cooked too 
hard. 

ALPINE EGGS 

MRS. A. N. BROUGHTON 

Butter a shallow baking dish and line it with thin slices of 
cheese. Break over this as many eggs as desired, being careful 
not to break the yolks, and season with salt and pepper. Chop 
fine a little parsley and bake in a quick oven ten minutes. 



46 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

SCRAMBLED EGGS 

M. C. H. 

Beat three eggs slightly with half a cup of milk. Melt one table- 
spoon of butter, season with salt and pepper, pour in the egg y and 
allow to scramble with as little stirring as possible. 

EGG TIMBALES 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

4 eggs 1 cup of cream 

}/2 dessertspoon of mushroom 3^2 dessertspoon of wine 
catsup , 

Beat eggs separately; add catsup, cream, and wine. Bake 
twenty minutes in timbale molds set in hot water. Cover with 
paper while baking. 

ALEXANDRA'S EGG PUFFS 

MRS. CHARLES F. DOLE 

Take as many eggs as you have people, and separate whites 
from yolks, keeping yolks whole. Beat whites with a pinch of 
salt and pepper. Put spoonfuls of white on a buttered tin,* make 
in each a hole large enough to slip a whole yolk, cover with beaten 
white, and bake quickly. Serve with cheese sauce or any sauce 
preferred. 

EGG CUTLETS 

MISS SCHIRMER 

2 tablespoons of butter 5 tablespoons of flour 

1 cup of scalded milk 1 teaspoon of finely chopped 

}/2 teaspoon of paprika parsley 

1 teaspoon of salt % teaspoon of finely grated onion 

8 hard-boiled eggs • A little mustard 

Rub butter and flour together, pour on milk gradually, and 
bring to boiling point. Cook five minutes in a double boiler. 

Cut eggs in coarse pieces and add with remaining ingredients. 
When cool form in cutlets, dip in flour, egg, and bread crumbs, 
and fry in deep fat. 



EGGS AND CHEESE 47 



POACHED EGGS 

MRS. H. O. HOFMAN 

Cut and fry one onion in oil. Cook two tablespoons of tomato 
in that, add a little water, and poach eggs, without breaking the 
yolks. 

POTS A LA CREME 

MRS. H. O. HOFMAN 

1 cup of cream 4 egg yolks, beaten in the cream 

Add the beaten whites of four eggs and beat all together; add 
one-eighth of a pound of grated Swiss cheese and one-half a glass 
of light white wine. Mix all together and bake in ramekins, set 
in hot water, for twenty minutes. 

DROPPED EGGS IN PASTRY SQUARES 

MISS R. H. SMITH 

Drop eggs as for poaching and take them out before they are 
thoroughly cooked. Cut little squares of very thin puff paste, 
put eggs in the center, turn the four corners to the center, and 
fry in a frying basket until pastry is a light brown; then serve. 

TOMATO SAUCE FOR OMELETS 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

Cook three tablespoons of butter with one tablespoon each of 
chopped onion and chopped pepper; add one-half can of toma- 
toes and simmer until thick. Season with salt and pepper and 
add one tablespoon each of vinegar and chopped olives. 

CORN OMELET 

MISS MARGARET MORSE 

4 eggs 4 tablespoons of grated green corn 

Beat yolks and whites of eggs separately. Add corn to yolks 
and season with pepper and salt. Add whites, beaten stiff, and 
bake in omelet pan until set. 



48 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

Make cream sauce separately; add one tablespoon of grated 
corn to one pint of sauce, and seasonings. Cook together for 
three or four minutes and pour around omelet in a deep platter. 

If desired add one tablespoon of chopped green peppers to one 
pint of sauce. 

EGG TOMATOES 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

Choose good-sized tomatoes and slice off the stem end, scoop 
out some of the inside, and drop a raw egg into each. Cover with 
butter, seasonings, and crumbs and bake until egg is set. Gar- 
nish with small piece of parsley. 



DESSERTS 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

MRS. J. SIDNEY STONE 

Put one quart of milk and one and one-half squares of un- 
sweetened chocolate in a double boiler. When milk has reached 
scalding point beat the mixture with a wire whisk until smooth; 
then add one-third cup of sugar, one-fourth teaspoon of salt, and 
two tablespoons of granulated gelatine which has been soaked ten 
minutes in three tablespoons of cold water. As soon as gelatine has 
dissolved strain mixture into a mold first dipped in cold water. 
Chill, remove from mold, and pour around it the following sauce: 

Mint Marshmallow Sauce 

Put one-fourth cup of boiling water and one-half cup of sugar 
into a small saucepan and boil until it has reached consistency 
of a thin syrup. Add eight marshmallows, cut in small pieces, and 
pour mixture gradually, while beating constantly, on the white of 
one egg, beaten stiff, but not dry. Color light green, using vege- 
table coloring, and add one drop of oil of peppermint. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

MISS MARY R. JOSLIN 

2Yi cups of milk 2 cups of bread crumbs 

2 squares of chocolate 3^2 CU P of sugar 

3 eggs 

Scald the milk, add chocolate, grated, and bread crumbs. Take 
from fire and add the sugar and beaten egg yolks. Bake in pud- 
ding dish fifteen minutes. 

Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs and three tablespoons 
of sugar; spread over the pudding and brown. 

Serve hot with Hard Sauce. 

49 



50 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

% cup of sugar % CU P of milk 

1 cup of flour 1 egg 

1 teaspoon of butter 1 J^ squares of chocolate, melted 

}4 teaspoon of soda 

Beat egg and add sugar. Sift soda with flour, add to egg and 
sugar alternately with the milk; then add melted chocolate, and 
last the melted butter. Flavor with one teaspoon of vanilla. 
Steam one hour and serve with Hard or Egg Sauce. 



CHOCOLATE TART 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

Y2 pound cake of Maillard's un- 53^ tablespoons of powdered 
sweetened chocolate (use no sugar 
other) 3 eggs 

To the beaten yolks of the eggs add the sugar, then the chocolate, 
grated, and then the whites of eggs beaten stiff. (No other in- 
gredients.) Bake in two large cake tins in a fairly hot oven. Serve 
with one-half pint of whipped cream between the layers. 



APPLE DOWDY 

MISS H. J. PEARCE 

1 cup of rye meal 1 cup of graham meal 

1 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 

Y2 teaspoon of soda 3^2 peck of apples 

Mix with enough milk to make a dough which can be rolled. 
Cut apples in quarters and bake in a deep dish, rounded full and 
covered with dough. Sweeten apples either before or after baking. 

Bake from one and a half to two hours in a slow oven. Take 
off crust at once, break in pieces, and press into the hot apple; 
then cover and allow to steam and cool. 

If made in the morning it may be used at night for dessert, or 
it will make a fine breakfast dish. Will keep for days. 

Serve with the richest cream possible to procure. 



DESSERTS 5 1 

DULING APPLE DUMPLINGS 

MRS. CHARLES H. CURTIS 

2 cups of flour 2 teaspoons of baking powder 

1 teaspoon of salt 1 tablespoon of butter 

1 tablespoon of lard % cup of sweet milk 

1 teaspoon of cinnamon 2 tablespoons of brown sugar 

3 tart apples, chopped 

Sift flour, baking powder, and salt and work into these the 
lard and butter. Make a dough, using the milk, and roll out into a 
sheet one-half inch thick. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle 
with brown sugar and cinnamon. Spread with chopped apple, 
roll as for jelly roll, and cut across into twelve slices. Place these 
on end in buttered baking pan and pour over them the following 
sauce : 

Sauce for Duling Dumplings 

1 cup of sugar 1 tablespoon of butter 

1 tablespoon of flour Yi teaspoon of salt 

1 cup of hot water 34 lemon, sliced thin 

Mix sugar, flour, and salt. Add butter, lemon, and hot water. 
Mix thoroughly, cook three minutes, and pour over raw dumplings. 



APPLE PUDDING 

S . S . B . 

Pare and core six apples. Scrape out some of the inside from 
each apple and mix with sugar, cinnamon, some grated lemon peel, 
chopped seedless raisins, and chopped nuts. Fill cavities with mix- 
ture ; place in well-buttered dish ; pour over one-half glass of water, 
one-half glass of Sherry, and three-fourths cup of sugar, and bake 
until partly tender, basting frequently. 

Cream together two tablespoons of butter and one cup of sugar ; 
add beaten yolks of four eggs, one-third of a small loaf of bread 
which has been soaked in milk, juice and grated rind of lemon, 
and the stiffly beaten whites of four eggs. Pour this over apples 
and bake in slow oven about forty-five minutes. 



52 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

INDIVIDUAL APPLE PUDDING 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Line individual molds with very thin bread and butter cut in 
lady fingers, fill with apples, sweeten and flavor, cover with 
bread, and bake in oven. Serve with liquid sauce. 

APPLE CHARLOTTE 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

Pare and chop six or eight large sour apples. Butter a pudding 
dish and cover bottom with fine bread crumbs and small bits of 
butter. Then put in a layer of apple with sprinkling of sugar and 
nutmeg. Repeat layers of crumbs, etc., until all apple is used, 
ending with crumbs and butter on top. Pour over the whole one 
cup of cold water and bake half an hour, or until apple is soft. 
Serve with hard sauce or cream and sugar. 

APPLE PUDDING . 

MRS. CAMPBELL 

. One quart of apples, cut in pieces and put in pudding dish with 
one cup of sugar, one-half cup of water, and flavoring of nutmeg. 
Bake twenty minutes, remove from oven, and cover with the 
following 

Batter 

1 egg 1 large tablespoon of melted butter 

}/2 cup of milk 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 

Y<L teaspoon of soda 1 cup of flour 
Salt 

Bake in a hot oven and serve with Hard Sauce. 

APPLE SOUFFLE 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

One-fourth cup of butter and one cup of sugar creamed to- 
gether as for cake. Beat into this the juice of one lemon and the 
yolks of three eggs. Add six large apples or eight small apples, 
pared and grated, and mix well. Beat the whites of three eggs 



DESSERTS S3 

very stiff and fold into mixture. Bake slowly about three quarters 
of an hour, or until, when tested with a clean straw, the straw 
will come out without sticking. 

CUSTARD SOUFFLE 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

3 tablespoons of butter }/i cup of flour 

1 cup of scalded milk 4 eggs 

34 cup of sugar 

Melt butter; add flour and gradually hot milk. When well 
thickened pour onto yolks of eggs, beaten until thick and lemon 
colored, and mixed with sugar. Cool, then cut and fold in the 
whites of eggs, beaten stiff and dry. Turn into buttered pudding 
dish and bake from thirty to thirty-five minutes in a slow oven. 
Take from oven and serve at once. Serve with Creamy or Foamy 
Sauce. 

Foamy Sauce 

Yi cup of butter 1 cup of powdered sugar 

1 egg 2 tablespoons of wine 

Cream the butter; add sugar gradually, egg, well beaten, and 
wine. Beat while heating over hot water. 

WASHINGTON PIE 

MRS. WILLIAM O. WITHERELL 

Two eggs, beaten very light; one cup of sugar, added gradually; 
one cup of flour, sifted with one teaspoon of baking powder; one 
teaspoon of vanilla; one-half cup of milk and one teaspoon of 
butter, boiled together and added last. 

RICE PUDDING 

MRS. BALDERSTON 

Take one even tablespoon of uncooked rice to one pint of milk. 
Sweeten to taste with dark-brown sugar. Grate nutmeg over the 
top. Cook slowly in not too hot an oven, and when skin forms 
stir in well two or three times until rice is well cooked. Then allow 
the pudding to finish cooking, keeping the skin on top at the last. 



54 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

COFFEE SOUFFLfi 

MRS. A. N. BROUGHTON 

1 cup of coffee % cup of scalded milk 

Yi cup of sugar 2 teaspoons of Knox's gelatine 

2 eggs, beaten separately 

Soak gelatine in a little cold water for a few minutes, then add 
hot milk and coffee and cook in double boiler for a few minutes. 
Add sugar and egg yolks, and lastly the beaten whites and one- 
half teaspoon of vanilla. Beat thoroughly and turn into mold. 
Serve cold with whipped cream. 



LEMON RICE PUDDING 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

One cup of rice, boiled in water with a little salt. When boiled 
add the yolks of three eggs, one teaspoon of sugar, and the grated 
rind of one lemon. Put all in baking dish. To the whites of eggs 
add juice of the lemon and one and one-half cups of sugar; beat 
to a froth, spread over the rice, and bake ten minutes, or until 
brown. 

DELICIOUS RICE PUDDING 

MRS. HENRY E. BELLEW 

To one quart of boiling salted water add three-fourths cup of 
rice and boil for thirty-five minutes. Drain, place in shallow 
pan, and set in oven for a very few minutes. Heat two cups of 
milk and add to this one-fourth cup of sugar, melted to a light- 
brown syrup by placing in omelet pan over hot fire and stirring 
constantly. Add two eggs, well beaten, strain into baking dish, 
add rice, and bake as you would cup custard. Serve cold, cut 
into neat squares, with Foamy Sauce, 

Foamy Sauce 

Generous J/£ cup of butter 1 cup of powdered sugar 

2 eggs, well beaten 

Beat all while heating over hot water. Add two tablespoons of 
Port or Sherry wine. 



DESSERTS 55 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 pint of rich cream 3^ cup of sugar 

1 teaspoon of vanilla Sponge cake 

Mix the cream, vanilla, and sugar. Place the bowl in ice water, 
and when chilled whip to a stiff froth and skim off the froth into 
a sieve. Drain and whip again that which has drained through. 
When nearly all whipped line a glass dish with lady fingers or 
sponge cake, fill with the cream, put cubes of wine jelly or any 
bright jelly on the cream, and keep on ice until ready to serve. 

INDIAN PUDDING. "Good" 

S. G. C. 

3 tablespoons of tapioca 1 pint of hot milk 

3 level tablespoons of Indian meal 3^ CU P of sugar 

J£ cup of molasses 1 pint of cold milk 

Small piece of butter Saltspoon of salt 

Soak tapioca in one cup of water for two hours. Heat one pint 
of milk, add salt, and add slowly the Indian meal. Boil a few 
seconds and pour over the tapioca. Add other ingredients and 
bake slowly four hours. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE PUDDING 

MISS LAURA KELSEY 

4 slices of stale chocolate cake 3 cups of milk 

Yi cup of sugar }/± teaspoon of salt 

1 egg 3 tablespoons of cornstarch 

2 tablespoons of Baker's cocoa 1 tablespoon of Bensdorp's cocoa 
Yi teaspoon of vanilla 3^ pint of whipping cream 

Scald milk in double boiler. Mix cocoa and sugar together, dis- 
solve in some of the scalded milk, and add to the rest. Moisten 
cornstarch with a little cold milk and thicken boiling liquid, adding 
the salt. Beat the egg very light and stir into the mixture, tak- 
ing care not to let the egg touch the side of the kettle. Remove 
from fire and add vanilla. Break cake into a pudding dish and 
pour the hot custard over it, stirring it well together. When cold 
cover with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored to taste. 



56 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

PRUNE PUDDING 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

Whites of three eggs, beaten to a stiff froth; one-half cup of 
sugar; six prunes, chopped fine. Beat all together and put in 
mold. Set in pan of hot water and bake twenty-five minutes. 
Serve cold, surrounded with whipped cream. 

LEMON BREAD PUDDING 

MRS. T. G. REES 

1 cup of bread crumbs, soaked Yolks of 2 eggs 

10 minutes in 1 pint of milk J/£ CU P of sugar, beaten with eggs 
Pinch of salt 1 teaspoon of butter 

Grated rind of 1 lemon 

Bake until firm, then partly cool. Mix the whites of two eggs, 
beaten stiff, with one-half cup of powdered sugar and juice of one 
lemon, and put on top. Brown in oven. 

SIMPLE PUDDING 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

2 cups of milk % cup of fine bread crumbs 
2 tablespoons of sugar 1 egg f well beaten 

Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons of melted butter 

Put a little jam or stewed apple in dish, pour in the well-beaten 
mixture, and bake. 

ENGLISH MARMALADE PUDDING 

M. C. 

4 ounces of bread crumbs 4 ounces of finely chopped suet 

4 ounces of orange marmalade 2 ounces of sugar 
2 eggs Milk Salt 

Mix well together the bread crumbs, suet, sugar, and a good 
pinch of salt. Beat the eggs well, add the marmalade and milk, 
and stir into the dry ingredients. When well mixed turn into a 
greased mold or basin, cover with a greased paper, and steam 
from two to two and a quarter hours. Serve with cornflour, 
marmalade, or other suitable sauce. 



DESSERTS 57 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

Two large slices of bread, buttered on both sides. Pour over 
this one-half cup of boiling water and let stand twenty minutes; 
then add two eggs, well beaten, one-half cup of sugar, one-half cup 
of molasses, and one quart of milk. Mix thoroughly, pour into 
a buttered baking dish, and bake two hours in a moderate oven. 

MARLBOROUGH PUDDING 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

Y cup of butter 1 grated lemon peel and pulp 

Y cup of sugar 6 large apples, stewed and 
3 eggs strained 

Mix and bake with or without a crust. 

COLLEGE DUMPLINGS 

MISS S. L. EDWARDS 

Y2 loaf of bread 1 pint of milk 

Y2 cup of butter % cup of sugar 

1 cup of currants 1 cup of raisins, stoned and 

Y cup of citron chopped 

3 eggs Rind of 1 lemon 

Y teaspoon of clove 1 teaspoon of cinnamon 

Break bread in pieces and soak in two-thirds of milk. Melt 
butter in rest of milk; beat eggs and sugar together and add all 
to the soaked bread with spices and fruit. Bake in cups. 

ANNIES STEAMED PUDDING 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

Stir four ounces of butter to a cream, add two ounces of sifted 
sugar, and then add four ounces of sifted flour. Beat all together, 
adding two well-beaten eggs. Add two large tablespoons of orange 
marmalade and one teaspoon of lemon extract. Mix all well to- 
gether and add one-fourth teaspoon of soda, dissolved in one 
teaspoon of cold water. Put in a well-buttered mold and steam 
two hours. Serve with Grandmother's Pudding Sauce. 



58 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

CHRISTMAS PUDDING 

MRS. CAMPBELL 

1 cup of molasses 34 cup of su ct or butter 

% cup of sour milk 1 egg 

1 teaspoon of soda 1 teaspoon of lemon extract 

1 cup of raisins 34 cup of currants 
34 teaspoon of cinnamon 34 teaspoon of clove 
4 cups of flour Nutmeg and citron 

Steam four hours. 

FRUIT PUDDING 

MRS. C. FRANK ALLEN 

4 cups of bread crumbs 134 cups of flour 

34 cup of butter 1 small cup of sugar 

34 teaspoon of nutmeg 3 teaspoons of baking powder 

34 teaspoon of salt 334 cups of milk 

2 cups of raisins 1 cup of currants and citron » 

Mix thoroughly, steam about three hours, then take off lid 
and set in oven for about fifteen minutes. Serve hot, with Hard 
Sauce. 

Hard Sauce 

Cream one-half cup of butter; add one cup of powdered sugar, 
one teaspoon of vanilla, and two tablespoons of cream. 



PLUM PUDDING 

MRS. H. DE FOREST LOCKWOOD 

134 pounds of bread 1 pound of sugar 

1 pound of butter 3 pints of milk 

2 pounds of seeded raisins 1 pound of currants 
1 pound of citron 9 eggs 

1 wineglass of brandy Salt, mace, clove, cinnamon, 

34 teaspoon of soda and nutmeg to taste 

Bake in pudding crock four hours in slow oven. 
This will keep months and is good sliced and warmed on spider 
or in oven. Half the quantity, using fr<re eggs, is enough for a 



DESSERTS 59 

medium-sized pudding. The whole rule makes one large and one 
small pudding. 

SUET PUDDING 

S. G. C. 

1 cup of suet, chopped fine 1 cup of molasses 

1 cup of milk 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar 

1 teaspoon of soda 1 cup of raisins 

V/2 cups of flour 

Steam three or four hours. 

Currants and nuts, also candied lemon or orange peel, may be 
added. 

SUET PUDDING 

MRS. H. M. PARSHLEY 

1 cup of raisins 1 cup of flour, sifted with Y2 

1 cup of crumbs teaspoon of ginger and % 

1 cup of finely chopped suet level teaspoon of soda 

1 cup of molasses 1 cup of milk 

1 egg> well beaten 2 juicy apples 

Citron 

Mix well and steam three hours in a greased double boiler. 
Serve with Hard Sauce. 

RICH PASTRY 

L. C. 

1 cup of butter 2 cups of pastry flour 

Chop until it is like sawdust, then turn in one tumbler of ice 
water, and roll out. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

1 cup of cranberries 1 cup of sugar 

1 cup of boiling water 1 tablespoon of flour 

}/2 cup of seeded raisins 

Cook cranberries, water, and raisins until soft, and add sugar 
and flour while hot. Cool and add one teaspoon of vanilla and one 
teaspoon of soda. Stir well and bake with two crusts. 



60 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

MARLBOROUGH FILLING. For Pies and Patties 

MISS ROSAMOND MAY 

12 apples 12 eggs 

% pound of butter, washed % pound of sugar 

Grated rind of 2 lemons Juice of 1 lemon 

Steam apples and rub through sieve on butter and sugar. Mix 
warm ; then stir in eggs. Put in pastry as for custard pies and small 
patties. Brown in oven. 

To be made in the fall, when apples are at their best. 

MINCE MEAT 

L. C. 

6 pounds of round of beef, mak- 2 pounds of chopped raisins 
ing 3 pounds when minced 2 pounds of chopped apples 

2 pounds of currants 3^2 pint of cider 

1 pound of suet, chopped very fine 4 teaspoons of cloves 

1 pint of brandy Sugar, salt, cinnamon, and mace 

1 pint of wine to taste 

3 nutmegs 

MINCE MEAT 

MRS. B. W. MUNROE 

lYl pounds of tongue 2 pounds of suet 

2 pounds of chopped apple 2 pounds of sugar 

3 pounds of chopped raisins 2 pounds of currants 
34 ounce of cloves 1 ounce of cinnamon 
1 ounce of mace 1 nutmeg 

1 full quart of wine 1 full glass of good brandy 

Citron to taste Salt, " and a good deal of it! " 

More sugar if desired 

This is an old Plymouth recipe. 

Do not cook it again after it is put together. 

NUT PUDDING 

MRS. SAMUEL B. CAPEN 

One and one-half cups of brown sugar and one cup of water 
boiled together. Soak one-half box of gelatine in one cup of cold 



DESSERTS 6 1 

water and pour boiling syrup over it. Strain and set away to 
cool. When nearly hardened add the beaten whites of four eggs 
and the chopped meats of twelve English walnuts. Pour in large 
or in individual molds and serve with whipped cream. 

IMPERIAL PUDDING 

MRS. G. T. REES 

Cut plain white cake in slices. Toss on the slices one-half pint 
of cream, whipped, sweetened, and slightly flavored with vanilla. 
Set in refrigerator. When time to serve pour over it warm Choc- 
olate Sauce. 

Chocolate Sauce 

Two squares of chocolate dissolved in one cup of boiling water; 
one cup of powdered sugar. Cook five minutes and flavor with 
one teaspoon of vanilla. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE 

MISS SCHIRMER 

1 cup of sugar 1 heaping tablespoon of flour 
Piece of butter the size of a wal- 1 cup of milk 

nut 2 eggs 

Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon Pinch of salt 

Rub together butter, sugar, and flour; add egg yolks, lemon, and 
milk; and lastly stir in the beaten whites of eggs. Bake one hour 
in moderate oven, using no top crust. 

LEMON PIE 

MRS. T. W. TUCKER 

V/2 cups of sugar 1 rounded tablespoon of corn- 
3^2 cup of lemon juice starch 

2 cups of boiling water 1 good tablespoon of butter 
Yolks of 2 eggs Grated peel of 13^ lemons 

Boil sugar, cornstarch, and hot water for five minutes. Remove 
from stove; add butter, lemon juice, and peel, and last the egg 
yolks, beaten very light. Cool before putting into crust. Use 
whites of eggs for top. 



62 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

GREEN TOMATO PIE 

MRS. M. W. SHORE 

Lay pastry in pie dish and fill with sliced green tomatoes. 
Sprinkle with cinnamon and pinch of salt. Add one tablespoon 
of flour, one cup of sugar, and juice of one lemon. Cover and 
bake thoroughly. 

COCOANUT CREAM PIE 

MISS SCHIRMER 

2 eggs 1 cup of sugar 

J/2 cup of milk Piece of butter the size of an egg 

V/l teaspoons of baking powder 2 cups of flour 

Cream the butter and sugar; add egg yolks, flour sifted with 
baking powder, and milk. 

Cream for Filling 

}/2 pint of milk 1 level tablespoon of cornstarch 

Y2 CU P of sugar 2 large tablespoons of shredded 

1 egg cocoanut 

Put milk in double boiler and bring to a boil. Beat egg and 
sugar together, add cornstarch, and add to boiling milk; then add 
cocoanut and boil five minutes. 

Frosting 

Beat whites of two eggs and add enough powdered sugar for 
stiff frosting. Sprinkle thickly with cocoanut and, after it is on 
the pie, set a moment in oven to brown. 

CRANBERRY PIE 

MRS. H. O. HOFMAN 

1 cup of cranberries, chopped Pinch of salt 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of raisins 

2 tablespoons of water 2 Uneeda biscuits or 2 round 
3^2 teaspoon of vanilla crackers, rolled 

Few drops of almond extract 



DESSERTS 63 

RAISIN PUFFS 

MRS. G. W. ROLLINS 

1 egg }/2 cup of milk 

1 tablespoon of butter 2 tablespoons of sugar 

3 even teaspoons of baking powder % cup of raisins 
}/2 teaspoon of vanilla 1 cup of flour 

Steam forty-five minutes in buttered cups. Serve with sauce. 

ORANGE PUFFS 

MRS. W. B. RUSSELL 

Y2 cup of butter 1 cup of sugar 

2 cups of flour 4 teaspoons of baking powder 
2 eggs % cup of milk 

3^2 teaspoon of orange extract 
Serve hot with the following 

Orange Sauce 

Mix one-half cup of sugar with one and one-half tablespoons of 
cornstarch and one-eighth teaspoon of salt. Add one cup of 
boiling water and boil five minutes. Add grated rind and juice 
of two oranges and two tablespoons of butter. 

MOCHA TART 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

4 eggs 1 cup of powdered sugar 

1 scant cup of flour 2 tablespoons of coffee extract 

1 teaspoon of baking powder 

Stir yolks of eggs with sugar; add flour mixed with baking 
powder and then the extract. Beat the whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth and add last. Bake in two or three layer cake pans. 

Filling 

One-half pint of cream and two teaspoons of coffee extract. 
Sweeten to taste, with powdered sugar. 



64 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

MARIA'S STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE 

M. C. H. 

2 cups of flour Yi cup of milk 

2 tablespoons of lard 1 tablespoon of sugar 

Pinch of salt V/2 teaspoons of baking powder 

Bake ten or fifteen minutes in a good hot oven. Split and fill 
with mashed and sweetened berries. Cover with whipped cream 
and garnish with whole berries. 

SHORT CAKE 

MRS. EVERIT 

1 heaping pint of flour 1 teaspoon of salt 

2 teaspoons of baking powder 2 tablespoons of sugar 
1 tablespoon of butter 1 tablespoon of lard 

1 cup of milk 1 egg 

Mix dry ingredients and sift thoroughly. Rub in butter and 
lard. Mix milk and egg together and mix lightly into dry mix- 
ture. Spread in shallow pan, sprinkle with sugar, and bake 
twenty minutes. Split and fill with mashed and sweetened berries 
or fruit. Cover top with whipped cream. 

ITALIAN CREAM 

MISS S. L. EDWARDS 

1 box of gelatine 1 quart of milk 

1 pint of cream, whipped 1 cup of sugar 

1 cup of wine 

Soak gelatine in milk and add sugar, wine, and cream. 

COFFEE CREAM 

MRS. HENRY L. RAND 
A delicious dessert and simple to make. 

}/% box of gelatine 1 cup of sugar 

}/2 pint of milk 1 cup of strong hot coffee 

1 pint of cream 1 teaspoon of vanilla 



DESSERTS 65 

Cover the gelatine with cold water and soak for half an hour. 
Then pour over it the boiling coffee and add the sugar, stirring 
until dissolved. Let it stand until it is cool. While it is cooling 
whip the cream. Add first the milk and then the cream. 
Stir carefully until thoroughly mixed, and last add the vanilla. 
Turn into a mold and put it in the ice chest to harden. If made 
early in the day it will be ready to serve by six o'clock. 

EGG CREAM 

MRS. J. SIDNEY STONE 

2 eggs 2 tablespoons of sugar 

Juice and grated rind of Y2 lemon 
Separate yolks and beat with sugar until well mixed; then put 
in lemon juice and rind and place the bowl over the fire in a dish 
of boiling water. Stir slowly until it begins to thicken; then add 
the beaten whites of the eggs and stir until the whole resembles 
a very thick cream. Remove from fire and pour into glass dish 
and set away to cool. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM 

MRS. E. P. GERRY 

One can of sliced pineapple, chopped. Boil the juice with one 
cup of sugar. Dissolve one-half package of Knox's gelatine, add 
to syrup, and then add pineapple. When beginning to jell add 
one pint of cream. 

One-half can and one-half pint of cream will make one mold. 
If more fruit is liked use full-sized can to one-half pint of cream. 

Peach, with the addition of one teaspoon of vanilla, makes a 
good variation. 

LEMON CREAM 

MISS L. M. HEWINS 

Juice and pulp of 3 lemons 3^ pint of cold water 

6 eggs, beaten separately Yi pound of sugar 

Strain the mixture into a farina kettle and stir until it thickens. 
Serve cold in glass cups. 



66 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

STRAWBERRY SPONGE 

MRS. T. G. REES 

Hull one quart of strawberries, sprinkle with one cup of sugar, 
and let stand for an hour. Cover one-half box of gelatine with 
one-half cup of cold water. Mash berries and press out all the 
juice. Dissolve the gelatine with one cup of boiling water; add 
the juice of one lemon, the strawberry juice, with more sugar if 
desirable, and enough water to make fully three cups of liquid 
in all. When cold and beginning to jell beat in the whites of 
three eggs, stiffly beaten. Mold and serve with boiled custard. 

BLANC MANGE 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

1 quart of milk 4 tablespoons of cornstarch, dis- 

}/2 cup of sugar solved in milk 

Y2 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of vanilla 

Cook very thoroughly and mold. Serve with stewed or preserved 
fruit, or with chopped Canton ginger. 

"THE CLERGY'S DELIGHT" 

MISS ELIZABETH B. COMINS 

To the juice of one orange add an equal amount of Sherry wine 
and sweeten to taste. Shred two oranges with a silver fork. Take 
twelve lady fingers, separate them, dip each half in the orange 
juice, and place two rows of four each in a shallow glass dish; 
cover them with the shredded orange and sprinkle lightly with 
sugar. Repeat the process with the rest of the lady fingers, re- 
versing the direction of the alternate layers. Place in ice chest, 
and just before serving cover with one-half pint of whipped cream, 
flavored with sugar and vanilla to taste, or with one pint of vanilla 
ice cream. 

WINE JELLY 

MRS. C. L. RIDDLE 

One-half box of Cox's gelatine, dissolved in one cup of boiling 
water. Stir until dissolved and add one cup of boiling water, one 
cup of sugar, one cup of wine, and the juice of one-half lemon. 



DESSERTS 67 

ORANGE JELLY 

MRS. C. L. RIDDLE 

2 cups of orange juice (no more) Y2 paper of Cox's gelatine, dis- 
Juice of Y2 lemon solved vnV/i cups of water 

13^2 cups of sugar 
When gelatine is dissolved add the juice and sugar. Place over 
the fire in porcelain-lined stew pan and bring to boiling point, no 
more. Remove at once, pour into mold, and set away to cool. 

COFFEE JELLY 

MRS. C. L. RIDDLE 

Two cups of good hot coffee; one-half box of Cox's gelatine, 
soaked in enough water to soften; one cup of sugar. Pour coffee, 
while hot, onto the soaked gelatine, stir in the sugar, and let 
come to a boil. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING 

MRS. C. H. SOUTHER 

Y pint of cream, whipped Y pound of marshmallows, cut 

1 cup of chopped English walnuts in pieces 

Mix all together and put away to cool, in mold if preferred. 
Serve with the following 

Sauce 

Boil one cup of water and two cups of sugar; cool and add one 
cup of Claret. 

Pour around the pudding or serve separately. 

MARSHMALLOW DESSERT 

MRS. PAUL FOLSOM 

Y2 pint of heavy cream, whipped Y pound of marshmallows 

stiff 1 can of Hawaiian sliced pine- 
Sweetening to taste apple 
Y2 pound of English walnuts Maraschino cherries 

2 teaspoons of Sherry 

Cut marshmallows and nuts, not very fine. Mix first five in- 
gredients, place portions on slices of pineapple, and arrange 
cherries on top. 



68 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

A WHITE DESSERT 

MRS. CHARLES H. SOUTHER 

Turn a glass of raspberry jam into the center of a chop dish 
and cover with whipped cream. Then heap spoonfuls of hot or 
cold well-seasoned rice around it. 

TRILBY PUDDING 

MRS. A. J. PETERS 

Cut one-fourth pound of marshmallows in quarters and soak 
in one-half pint of cream, whipped. Place on ice for two or three 
hours and just before serving stir in one cup of chopped walnuts, 
a small bottle of Maraschino cherries, drained and cut, and one 
wineglass of (Somerset) Sherry. Serve in glass cups and decorate 
with cherry. 

"SPIFF!!" 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

In the bottom of a quart bowl place thin slices of buttered bread 
(baker's bread is best) from which the crusts have been cut. 
Have ready crushed berries, hot and sweetened, with plenty of 
juice ; pour over bread, add another layer, and repeat until bowl is 
full, having bread on top. There should be enough juice to 
moisten all the bread. Put on ice. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

Especially good with raspberries or blueberries. 

Raspberries, currants, blueberries, and blackberries combine 
well. Add currant jelly if currants cannot be obtained. 

MERINGUES 

MRS. H. DE FOREST LOCKWOOD 

Two ounces of granulated sugar to the white of one absolutely 
fresh egg. Beat egg very light and add sugar after beating, barely 
stirring it in. Drop on buttered paper on tin sheets and bake 
in slow oven until done. Break in the under side and fill with 
whipped cream. 

JELLIED APPLES 

MRS. E. U. HARRINGTON 

Pare, quarter, core, and slice enough apples to make a generous 
quart, and put in an earthen baking dish with sugar in alternate 



DESSERTS 69 

layers. Use about one and one-fourth cups of sugar. Pour in 
one-half cup of water, cover close, and bake three hours in a slow 
oven. Have ready one-fourth package of gelatine, softened in 
one-fourth cup of cold water and dissolved in one-fourth cup of 
boiling water or hot juice poured from apples. Mix the dissolved 
gelatine through the apple and turn into a mold. Chill and serve 
with cream about half whipped. 



STEWED PEARS WITH RICE 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Put four large pears, cut in halves, into a stew pan with a pint 
of Claret and eight ounces of sugar, and simmer until perfectly 
tender. Take out the pears, let the syrup boil down to half, 
and flavor it with vanilla. Have ready one cup of rice, nicely 
boiled in milk and sweetened. Spread it on dish, lay the pears on 
it, and pour the syrup over. Serve cold. 



BAKED BANANAS 

L. C. 

Peel six bananas and scrape off the shreds next the skin. Place 
on a buttered plate and cook half an hour, basting with the 
following 

Sauce 

2 teaspoons of water 2 teaspoons of butter 

2 teaspoons of sugar Juice of 2 lemons 

Cook this for a few minutes in a double boiler, then pour over 
bananas, put in oven, and baste often. 



SCALLOPED BANANAS 

MRS. NELSON CURTIS 

2 cups of soft bread crumbs Grated rind of 1 lemon 

(baker's bread is best) A little cold water 

Yi cup of butter Nutmeg 

6 bananas Sugar to taste 



7o THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



Melt the butter and stir into the crumbs; mix lemon rind, 
nutmeg, and sugar. Butter a pudding dish; put in alternate layers 
Of crumbs and fruit, sprinkled with sugar, until the dish is full. 
Have a thick layer of crumbs on top. Bake slowly and serve with 
cream. 

See also recipes for Popovers, Apple Cake, Moist Cake, and 
Gingerbread, 



PUDDING AND ICE CREAM SAUCES 

CREAM SAUCE 

MISS EMILY KNIGHT 

1 egg Yl cup of powdered sugar 

3 tablespoons of milk J^ teaspoon of vanilla or lemon 

Beat the white of egg to a stiff froth, then add the sugar, the 
egg yolk, and flavoring, and lastly the milk. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE 

MRS. CHARLES H. CURTIS 

One-fourth cup of butter, one cup of sugar, and one tablespoon of 
flour, creamed together. Add one cup of boiling water. Dissolve 
one square of Baker's chocolate in one cup of boiling water and 
add. Boil five minutes. 

Good either hot or cold. 

GRANDMOTHER'S SAUCE 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

One egg, white and yolk beaten together. Add one cup of 
fine granulated sugar and one and one-half tablespoons of Sherry. 
Just before serving add one tablespoon of boiling water. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE 

MRS. NELSON CURTIS 

Beat two tablespoons of butter to a cream, adding gradually 
one-half cup of powdered sugar; then add twelve strawberries, 
one at a time, mashing and beating until the whole is light. If 
it has a curdled appearance add a little more sugar and stand in 
a cold place until served. 

7i 



72 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

SAUCE FOR CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Heat one cup of orange marmalade with a wineglass of any- 
white wine. (A tablespoon of Sherry or a few drops only of brandy 
will do.) Chill thoroughly. 

APRICOT SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Peel apricots and cook for ten minutes with three or four of the 
kernels and sugar to taste. Press through sieve, and to one cupful 
add one tablespoon of Madeira. Chill thoroughly. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI. To serve with Vanilla Ice Cream 

MISS HELEN T. COMINS 

Put into an earthen crock and keep well covered one quart of 
whisky or brandy and add fresh fruits through the summer: 
pineapple, seeded grapes, peeled peaches, peeled plums, canta- 
loupe, melon, orange, stoned cherries, cut into small pieces. Add 
a cup of granulated sugar each time fruit is put into the crock 
until it is filled. Do not use bananas, apples, pears, or watermelon. 

See also 

Chocolate Sauce, page 61. 
Foamy Sauce, pages 53-54. 
Hard Sauce, page 58. 
Mint Marshmallow Sauce, page 49. 



FROZEN DESSERTS 
ICE CREAM 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

Mix three-fourths cup of sugar and two tablespoons of flour. 
Pour slowly onto this mixture one pint of scalded milk. Cook 
twenty minutes, stirring often, then add two beaten eggs, and 
cook a few minutes. When cool add three-fourths cup of sugar, 
one quart of milk, and one-half pint of cream. Add chocolate or 
fruit juices or any desired flavoring. 

MARSHMALLOW MOUSSE 

S. S. B . 

Whip one quart of cream; add one-half pound of marshmallows, 
cut in quarters, three-fourths cup of Maraschino cherries, and one- 
half cup of pecan nuts, chopped. Mix well together, fill mold, 
cover, pack in ice and salt, and let stand four hours. Garnish with 
marshmallows. 

PINEAPPLE MOUSSE 

M. C. L. 

1 can of shredded pineapple J4 box of gelatine 

1 pint of cream % cup of sugar 

Dissolve gelatine in one tablespoon of water ; add pineapple and 
then sugar. Whip the cream very stiff and fold into pineapple 
mixture. Place in closely sealed mold and let stand four hours 
in ice and salt. 

MAPLE MOUSSE 

L. C. 

Whip one-half pint of cream very stiff, then add enough maple 
syrup to color and flavor the cream. Put into a quart jar and pack 
in ice. This makes a quart of delicious cream. 

73 



74 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

MAPLE MOUSSE 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

6 eggs % cup of maple syrup, heated Yi pint of cream 

Beat yolks smooth and light, then pour over them the hot 
maple syrup, stirring constantly. Put over fire in double boiler 
and stir until it thickens. Take from fire and beat until it cools. 
Whip cream to a froth, beat whites of eggs stiff, and stir all 
lightly into the custard. Turn into mold and pack in ice and salt 
for at least four hours. 

CAFE FRAPPE 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

Make one quart of strong coffee, and when cold add one pint 
of rich cream and one large cup of sugar. Beat all together until 
it is foamy, then put in a tightly covered mold, and pack in 
chipped ice. Let stand in coldest part of refrigerator until ready 
to serve. 

MACAROON MOUSSE 

L. C. 

3^ cup of granulated sugar }/i cup of water 

Whites of 3 eggs 6 stale macaroons, pounded 

Y2 pint of cream 1 teaspoon of vanilla 

3^ teaspoon of almond 

Boil sugar and water to a syrup and pour onto whites of eggs, 
beaten stiff and dry. Cut in well-beaten yolks, the cream, and 
macaroons. Pack in ice and salt for three hours. 

This makes a quart mold. Four eggs and one pint of cream 
will make three pints. 

MILK SHERBET 

E. G. W. 

4 cups of milk lj^ cups of sugar Juice of 3 lemons 

Mix juice and sugar, stirring constantly, and add milk very 
slowly. Freeze and serve. 

If milk is added too rapidly the mixture will appear curdled. 



FROZEN DESSERTS 75 



FRUIT CHARTREUSE 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Peel four bananas and rub through a sieve ; add pulp and juice 
of two oranges, one tablespoon of lemon juice, one tablespoon of 
Sherry, one and two-thirds cups of powdered sugar, and one and 
one-fourth tablespoons of granulated gelatine, dissolved in one- 
fourth cup of boiling water. Cool in iced water, stirring constantly, 
and fold in two cups of whipped cream. When almost firm fill a 
large mold with the mixture and place a small mold in the center. 
When firm enough fill center mold with ice. When perfectly 
firm remove small mold and fill center with fresh, sweetened 
pineapple. 

GRAPE SHERBET 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

Stew about one quart of grapes with one cup of sugar and one- 
third cup of water. Mash through a strainer. Make a syrup of 
one cup of sugar and four cups of boiling water, boiling it for twenty 
minutes. Combine mixtures, cool, and freeze. 

BISQUE WITH APRICOTS 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

Bring one pint of milk to boiling point and add six large table- 
spoons of sugar. Whip one pint of cream until stiff and chop very 
fine one dozen macaroons. Add the juice of half a quart can of 
apricots to the milk and freeze. When partly frozen add the 
whipped cream, the powdered macaroons, the well-beaten white 
of one egg, and one wineglass of brandy. When this is frozen 
almost hard put in the apricots, cut in small pieces; turn a few 
times to mix apricots with the cream, and pack. 

This should be made an hour or two before serving. 

TORTONI 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Boil together one-half cup of sugar and one-half cup of cold 
water until it slightly strings from the spoon. Beat three eggs 
thoroughly; add the boiling sugar slowly,, beating all the while, 



76 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

about twenty-five minutes. Mix one-half pint- of cream with one 
cup of milk and whip stiff. Mix all together; add one teaspoon 
of vanilla and ten powdered macaroons. Put in mold and pack 
in ice and salt for six hours or longer. 

CAFE PARFAIT 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

1 pint of cream 3^2 CU P of strong coffee Y2 CU P of sugar 

Whip the cream until very stiff, then stir in the sugar and 

lastly the cold coffee. Pack in mold, or freeze, letting it stand 

four hours well packed in ice and salt. 

To pack, use one bowl of salt to four bowls of cracked ice. 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 

"Man cannot live by bread alone." 

— W. B. W. 

MILK BREAD 

MRS. N. J. MARSHALL 

1 pint of milk, scalded and cold 1 teaspoon of butter, melted in 
}/2 yeast cake the hot milk 

1 teaspoon of salt 1 tablespoon of sugar 

Measure the milk after scalding, and put in mixing bowl; add 
the butter, sugar, and salt. When cool add the yeast, and then 
stir in the flour, adding it gradually after five cups are in, so that 
it may not be too stiff. Use just enough to knead it, and knead 
until smooth and elastic. Cover, let it rise until light, cut it down, 
divide into four parts, shape into loaves or biscuits, and let it 
rise again in the pans. Bake forty or fifty minutes. 

GRAHAM BREAD 

MRS. E. U. HARRINGTON 

2 cups of water J^ yeast cake 

Y2 cup of molasses 1 teaspoon of salt 

1 teaspoon of shortening Graham flour 

Stir in flour with a spoon until very thick and let it stand over 
night. In the morning put in pan and let rise a few minutes. 
Bake one hour. 

GRAHAM BREAD 

G. G. N. 

1/4 cups of graham flour 1 cup of white flour 

1 teaspoon of salt % teaspoon of soda 

1 cup of sour milk }/% CU P of molasses 

. Mix and sift dry ingredients, add milk to molasses, and combine 
mixtures. 

77 



78 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

SWEET LOAF 

H. J. D. MISS S. L. EDWARDS 

1 cup of dough 1 cup of sugar 

Y2 CU P of butter % cup of milk 

1 cup of raisins, chopped Y2 nutmeg 

Y2 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in Less than 1 cup of flour 
milk 

Beat together dough, butter (slightly softened) , sugar, and eggs, 
unbeaten. Then add milk, raisins, nutmeg, and one tablespoon 
of brandy. Raise like bread and bake accordingly, the same heat 
and time. 

SHREDDED WHEAT BREAD 

MISS B. S. FORBES 

Break into a bowl one shredded wheat biscuit and pour over it 
one cup of scalded milk. Add: 

2 tablespoons of molasses Yi tablespoon of lard 

Y% teaspoon of salt 

When mixture is lukewarm add one-half yeast cake, dissolved 
in two tablespoons of warm water. Add three to three and one- 
half cups of bread flour and knead thoroughly. Finish like white 
loaf bread. 

This makes one loaf. 

CORN BREAD 

MISS MARGARET MORSE 

1~Y cups of bolted corn meal Yi CU P of flour 

1 large egg or 2 small eggs 2 cups of milk 

Y cup of sugar 2 teaspoons of baking powder 
Pinch of salt 3 tablespoons of melted butter 

Bake in shallow pan. 

CORN BREAD 

S. G. C. 

2 cups of Indian meal 2 cups of flour 

Y CU P of sugar 1 egg 

2 tablespoons of butter 1 pint of milk 

3 level teaspoons of baking powder 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 79 



OATMEAL BREAD 

MRS. F. G., WABAN. MRS. C. FRANK ALLEN 

1 cup of rolled oats 2 cups of boiling water 

J^ cup of molasses 3^ yeast cake 

43^ cups of flour 1 teaspoon of butter 

1 teaspoon of salt 

Pour boiling water on oatmeal and let stand one hour; add 
molasses, and yeast, dissolved in two tablespoons of water. Add 
butter, flour, and salt. Mix well and let. stand over night. In 
the morning put in two pans and let rise one and a half hours; 
then bake in a moderate oven. 



BROWN BREAD 

MRS. WINTHROP C. DURFEE 

One cup of molasses and one teaspoon of soda, beaten together. 
Add: 

1 cup of boiling water 1 cup of cold water 

1 cup of yellow meal 1 cup of rye meal 

1 cup of white flour 1 teaspoon of salt 

Sift together, mix, and beat thoroughly; then add one cup of 
raisins if desired. Put in mold, immerse in boiling water, and boil 
four hours. 

TITUSVILLE BROWN BREAD 

M. C. L. 

4 cups of graham flour 2 cups of sweet milk 

Y2 cup of molasses 3 teaspoons of baking powder 

1 teaspoon of salt 3^2 teaspoon of soda 

3^ cup of raisins 

Bake thirty minutes. The last eight or ten minutes lay the 
tins on their sides. 

This makes four loaves if baked in one-pound baking powder 
tins. It is very good for sandwiches. 



80 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

BROWN BREAD 

MRS. JOSEPH E. BARRY 

Pour three-fourths pint of hot water on one pint of bread 
crumbs. Add one cup of corn meal, one-half cup of molasses, 
two-thirds cup of flour, one scant teaspoon of soda, one-half tea- 
spoon of salt, and raisins to taste. Steam four hours. 

NUT BREAD 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON. MRS. C. L. D. YOUNKIN 

Y2 cup of sugar 2 eggs 

2 cups of milk 4 cups of flour 

4 teaspoons of baking powder 1 teaspoon of salt 

1 cup of chopped walnuts 1 cup of raisins or dates if desired 

Let rise twenty minutes in two pans, then bake in a moderate 
oven twenty-five minutes. 

NUT BREAD 

MRS. T. G. REES 

3 cups of Franklin Mills whole 3 rounded teaspoons of baking 
wheat flour powder 

Y2 CU P of white sugar Yi teaspoon of salt 

1 cup of chopped walnuts V/2 cups of cold milk 

Let stand in greased pan twenty minutes, then bake in rather 
slow oven for nearly an hour. 

RAISED MUFFINS 

MRS. CHANNING WILLIAMS 

1 pint of scalded milk Butter the size of an egg 

Y yeast cake Y2 teaspoon of sugar 

Salt Flour to make a very light batter 

Bake in rings in oven. . 

NEW ENGLAND BLUEBERRY MUFFINS 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Beat one egg very light; add three-fourths cup of milk, then 
one pint of flour, sifted with two heaping teaspoons of baking 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 81 

powder, and two scant tablespoons of sugar. Add a pinch of salt, 
two teaspoons of melted butter, and last the berries, rubbed first 
through the flour. Bake thirty minutes in gem pans. 

DATE MUFFINS 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Remove stones and chop one-half pound of dates; beat them 
gradually into one-fourth cup of butter, creamed, and mix with 
a well-beaten egg. Add one cup of milk alternately with one 
pint of flour, sifted with three level teaspoons of baking powder. 
Beat thoroughly and bake nearly thirty minutes in well-buttered 
muffin pans or shallow tin. 

ENTIRE WHEAT MUFFINS 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

8 tablespoons of entire wheat 4 teaspoons of baking powder 

flour 1 tablespoon of sugar 

Pinch of salt Milk enough to make stiff batter 
2 tablespoons of melted butter to drop from spoon 

WESTERN MUFFINS 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Sift together three small cups of white flour and one cup of corn 
meal, one level teaspoon each of salt and cream of tartar, and one 
tablespoon of sugar. Work into this a heaping tablespoon of soft 
butter; add two beaten eggs and either buttermilk or sour milk 
to make a batter that is firm, but not too stiff. Beat hard and cook 
in muffin rings on top of range. Fill rings half full and turn when 
batter has risen to the top. They may be baked in gem pans in 
the oven. 

LUNCH ROLLS 

MRS. W. B. RUSSELL 

1 yeast cake 1 tablespoon of sugar 

134 cups of milk, scalded and 1 egg 

cooled 2 tablespoons of lard or butter 

4 cups of sifted flour 1 teaspoon of salt 



82 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

Dissolve yeast and sugar in lukewarm milk. Add shortening 
and two cups of flour and beat thoroughly. Add egg, well beaten, 
and gradually the rest of the flour and the salt. Let rise about 
two hours. When light, form into small biscuits, the size of a 
walnut, and place one inch apart in shallow pans. Let rise until 
double in bulk, brush with egg and milk, and bake ten minutes in 
hot oven. 

COFFEE CAKE 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

8 cups of flour 3 eggs 

}/s cup of butter Juice and rind of }/2 lemon 

1 yeast cake Milk enough to make a stiff 

1 cup of sugar batter 

Melt the butter, add sugar, and add to milk when warm; also 
the beaten eggs. Set to rise over night. In the morning place 
in pans, sprinkle with sugar, cinnamon, and bits of butter, and 
let rise again. Bake fifteen minutes. This makes three loaves. 



COFFEE MUFFINS 

MISS SUSAN L. MERRIAM 

2 cups of flour 2 eggs 

2 tablespoons of sugar 1 tablespoon of butter 
4 teaspoons of baking powder 1J^ cups of cold coffee 
Salt 

Mix and sift dry ingredients, then add eggs and coffee, and last 
the butter, melted. 

APPLE GEMS 

MRS. S. B. CAPEN 

3 large sour apples, chopped fine 2 eggs 

1 cup of milk Salt 

2 cups of flour }/2 cup of sugar 

Butter the size of a walnut 1 heaping teaspoon of baking 



Bake in hot gem pans. 



powder 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 83 

BEATEN BISCUITS. Southern Recipe 

L. C. 

1 quart of sifted flour 1 large tablespoon of shortening 

Pinch of soda (butter and lard, or all butter) 

1 teaspoon of salt Moisten with milk to a stiff 

dough 

Beat until smooth, cut with biscuit cutter, and bake in slow 
oven about twenty-five or thirty minutes. 



BANNOCKS 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

1 pint of milk % cup of white corn meal 

2 eggs, well beaten Butter the size of an egg 
Salt 

Scald the milk with the butter, stir in the corn meal, and boil 
all well. Cool, then stir in the eggs, and bake about thirty min- 
utes in a hot oven. 

BATTER BREAD 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Boil two cups of hominy, or one cup of rice, until very soft. 
Add an equal quantity of white corn meal, also salt and a large 
spoon of butter. Add three eggs and milk, making into a thin 
batter. Beat all together thoroughly and bake in round or 
square tins. 

RICE MUFFINS 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

Mix one and one-half cups of flour with two tablespoons of bak- 
ing powder and one-fourth teaspoon of salt. Beat one egg very 
light ; add one cup of milk and one tablespoon of butter, melted in 
one tablespoon of hot water. Stir these into flour mixture, beating 
well, then add one cup of hot cooked rice, and bake in gem pans. 



84 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

LUNCH MUFFINS 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

2 tablespoons of butter Yi CU P of sugar 

A little salt 2 eggs, well beaten 

1 cup of milk 2 teaspoons of baking powder 

2 scant cups of flour 

Beat sugar and butter together, then add eggs, milk, etc. Can 
be baked in tins or fried in rings. 

Graham 

Same as above, using three cups of graham flour. 

Rye 

As above, using four cups of rye. 

SARATOGA CORN CAKES 

MRS. N. J. MARSHALL 

1 cup of corn flour 1 cup of wheat flour 

1 egg 1 tablespoon of sugar 

1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 1 teaspoon of soda 

Pinch of salt Milk 

Mix with milk to the thickness of cake dough. 
This makes about twelve cakes. 

CORN CAKES 

MRS. N. J. MARSHALL 

1 egg 3 tablespoons of sugar 

% cup of Indian meal 2 cups of flour 

1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 1 teaspoon of soda 

Mix with sweet milk to the thickness of cake dough. 

This makes about fifteen cakes. 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 85 

RYE MUFFINS 

F. E. R. 

1 cup of milk 3^5 tablespoon of sugar 

Pinch of salt 1 egg 

1 cup of rye meal % cup of flour 

1 tablespoon of melted butter 
Bake in rounds or muffin pans. 

FRIED RYE MUFFINS 

MISSES P. 

13^2 CU P S of rye meal V/2 CU P S of flour 

1 cup of milk 2 eggs 

3 teaspoons of baking powder 2 heaping tablespoons of sugar 

}/2 teaspoon of salt 
Mix dry ingredients together. Beat the eggs well, add the 
milk, and stir all together thoroughly. Drop from spoon into deep 
fat and cook ten minutes. 

GRAHAM PUFFS 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

One pint of milk, a pinch of salt, graham flour to make a batter 
like griddle cakes. Half fill very hot gem pans and bake in very 
hot oven. 

WATER GEMS 

MRS. HENRY L. RAND 

One cup of sifted flour, one-half teaspoon of salt, one cup of 
ice water stirred into the flour and salt gradually. Heat the 
gem pans, put in each one tablespoon of melted butter, and place 
on stove until sizzling. Then drop in each two teaspoons of the 
batter and bake half an hour in a very hot oven. They should 
puff up and brown. 

BRAN CRACKERS 

MRS. C. F. DOLE 

1 cup of white flour 2 cups of bran flour 

Yi teaspoon of salt 1 egg 

Enough water to make the dough stiff enough to roll. 

Roll as thin as possible and cut. Bake slowly on tins. 



86 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

BRAN MUFFINS 

MISS MARGARET MORSE 

1J/2 cups of Gilman's bran Y cup of flour 

Y cup of molasses 1 cup of milk 

1 egg 1 tablespoon of melted butter 

1 teaspoon of soda Pinch of salt 



Bake in hot oven. 



BRAN MUFFINS 

MISS C. B. CLARK 



1 egg 2 teaspoons of baking powder, 
Y2 cup of milk sifted in Y2 cup of Educator 

2 teaspoons of sugar bran 

YL cup of flour 2 tablespoons of melted butter 
Bake fifteen minutes. 

BRAN BISCUIT 

H. L. P. 

2 cups of bran 1 cup of white flour 

1 teaspoon of soda 1Y cups of sour milk 

Y cup of butter 3 tablespoons of molasses 
Bake in gem pans in moderate oven. 

OATMEAL GEMS 

L. C. 

1 egg, beaten light Y cup of cold cooked oatmeal 

2 tablespoons of sugar Y teaspoon of salt 

1 tablespoon of melted butter \Y cups of pastry flour 

\Y teaspoons of baking powder 
Mix thoroughly. 

SQUASH MUFFINS 

MRS. B. H. BAILEY 

1 pint of sifted squash 1 cup of milk 

Y yeast cake Y cup of sugar 

2 tablespoons of melted butter 6 cups of flour 

Let rise over night, and in the morning stir in thoroughly one- 
fourth teaspoon of soda, dissolved in one tablespoon of warm water. 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 87 



ENGLISH MUFFINS 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Take one cup of bread dough when molding it for the last 
time, add one egg, beaten separately, enough milk for a soft 
batter, and a small piece of butter. Let them rise, and cook in 
muffin rings on griddle on top of stove. Cook five minutes, turn 
and cook five minutes on other side. 



OATMEAL CAKES 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

2 scant cups of cold oatmeal 1 cup of flour 

1 cup of milk 4 eggs 

4 teaspoons of baking powder 

Beat eggs and oatmeal together until very light. 

SCONES 

C. M. R. 

1 pound of flour Butter the size of an egg 

V/2 tablespoons of sugar 1 heaping teaspoon of salt 

1 heaping teaspoon of cream of 1 heaping teaspoon of soda 
tartar 

Rub together until very fine and smooth. Add enough milk to 
be able to roll it. Flour board and pin, and roll lightly, always 
in the same direction. Bake on a greased griddle and turn con- 
stantly until brown on all sides. Split, butter, and serve. 



CREAM WAFFLES 

C. M. R. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs thoroughly and add one teaspoon of 
soda, a pinch of salt, one pint of sour cream, and enough flour to 
make a thin batter. Add the whites of two eggs, beaten very 
stiff, and fold in very carefully. Do not beat. Cook on a waffle 
iron until a light brown. 



88 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

RICE WAFFLES 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 heaping teaspoon of butter 1 egg 
3 teaspoons of baking powder 1 pint of milk 
2Y2 cups of flour 1 cup of cold boiled rice 

3^2 teaspoon of salt 
Mix and sift dry ingredients, work in rice with fingers; add 
milk and egg yolk, well beaten, and butter. Fold in stiffly beaten 
white and cook on waffle iron. 

POPOVERS 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 cup of milk 1 cup of flour 

1 egg Pinch of salt 

Bake in very hot buttered iron gem pans, or in buttered earthen 
cups, in very hot quick oven. 

Serve as muffins, or with a sweet or chocolate sauce as a dessert. 

SQUASH GRIDDLE CAKES 

MRS. EDWARD B. LANE 

1 cup of boiling milk 1 cup of sifted squash 

1 tablespoon of butter 3^ teaspoon of salt 

1 egg 2 teaspoons of baking powder 

1 cup of flour 1 tablespoon of sugar 

Pour the hot milk into the squash; add the butter, sugar, and 
salt. When cool add the egg, well beaten, and the baking powder, 
mixed with the flour. If too thick add more milk ; if too thin add 
more flour. 

FLOUR AND INDIAN GRIDDLE CAKES 

MRS. WILLIAM D. HOWLAND 

2 cups of pastry flour 1 cup of Indian meal 
2 even teaspoons of baking 2 eggs 

powder Salt 

Sugar 

Put the baking powder dry into the flour and sift. Stir all well 
together and thin with cold milk. Fry with salt pork. 



BREADS AND MUFFINS 89 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

V/2 cups of buckwheat flour V/2 cups of pastry flour 

Molasses, salt, warm water }/$ yeast cake 

Let rise over night or from breakfast until lunch. Fry in salt 
pork. 

INDIAN GRIDDLE CAKES 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

One cup of Indian meal, scalded with boiling water and thinned 
with cold milk; two or three eggs, sugar, and salt. Fry with salt 
pork. 

RYE GRIDDLE CAKES 

MRS. W. D. HOWLAND 

2 cups of rye meal Y2 teaspoon of saleratus, mixed 

2 eggs with enough sweet milk to 

1 cup of flour make a batter thick enough 
Y2 CU P of molasses to fry well 

SHROVE TUESDAY PANCAKES 

E. G. W. 

2 eggs, slightly beaten 1 salt spoon of salt 
1 pint of milk 1 pint of flour 

Beat with Dover egg beater until smooth. 

Sauce 

One-half cup of water and one cup of sugar heated together ; add 
a little grated lemon rind, one butter ball, one-fourth nutmeg, 
grated, and one-half cup of Sherry. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 

" Wouldst thou both eat thy cake and have it? " 

— George Herbert. 

The usual method for mixing cake is to work the butter to a 
cream, adding the sugar gradually, then the beaten yolks, next the 
flavoring, and then the flour alternately with the milk until both 
are used. Last of all fold in lightly the whites, beaten stiff and 
dry. Do not beat these in and do not beat the cake hard after 
they are added. Put it at once into the pan and set in the oven. 
Close the door gently and do not allow any jar in the kitchen while 
the cake is baking. 

The bottom and sides of the pan should be well greased. For 
a fruit cake or any other which requires long baking, the pan should 
be lined with well-greased paper. 

Cake must not be put into an oven which is very hot at first 
and cools later. This cooks the outside of the batter and pre- 
vents it rising as it should; then as the heat declines, the baked 
crust pressing on the unbaked interior makes it fall. 

Do not open the oven until you think the cake has " set," or 
is partly baked all through, and not then unless there is reason 
to think that one side of the oven is hotter than the other. Never 
move the cake until the crust has formed. When a loaf must 
bake for a long time it is well to cover for the first half hour with 
brown paper. When done the cake will shrink slightly from the 
sides of the pan. A clean straw run into the thickest part of the 
cake should come out dry and free from dough. 

EGGLESS, BUTTERLESS, MILKLESS CAKE! 

M. C. L. 

2 cups of sugar 2 cups of water 

2 tablespoons of lard or Crisco 3 teaspoons of cinnamon 
1J/2 teaspoons of salt * , 1 pound of raisins 

90 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS Qi 

Cook these for five minutes, let cool, and add three cups of 
flour, sifted with one heaping teaspoon of soda. Bake about one 
hour in a moderate oven. 

Two loaves. 

EGGLESS CHOCOLATE CAKE 

MRS. F. E. BRIDGMAN 

1 cup of sugar 1 large tablespoon of shortening 

1 cup of sour milk 1 teaspoon of soda 

2 tablespoons of cocoa 2 cups of flour 

Yi teaspoon of cinnamon Y2 teaspoon of clove 

Y teaspoon of salt 



FRUIT CAKE. Without Eggs or Butter 

MRS. CLIFFORD DEVENS 

1 level teaspoon of soda, dissolved 1 cup of thick sour cream 
in 1 tablespoon of warm water 1 cup of brown sugar 

Y CU P of molasses 
Stir until sugar is dissolved and add: 
3 cups of sugar 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon 

Y nutmeg, grated Saltspoon of ginger 

Beat until smooth and stir in one pound of raisins that have 
been floured with two tablespoons of flour. Turn into a square 
bread pan and bake one hour in a slow oven. 

This cake should be kept in a tin box for three or four days 
before cutting. 



FRUIT CAKE. Without Eggs 

MRS. H. DE FOREST LOCKWOOD 

Yi cup of butter 1 cup of sugar 

V/2 cups of flour 1 cup of apple sauce with 1 tea- 

Y2 teaspoon of cinnamon spoon of soda 

Y teaspoon of clove Y teaspoon of nutmeg 

Y CU P of raisins 



92 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

EGGLESS CAKE 

MRS. C. FRANK ALLEN 

Y2 cup of butter, melted V/2 cups of sugar 

3 cups of flour 1 teaspoon of cinnamon 

1 whole nutmeg, grated 1 teaspoon of soda 

1 cup of raisins, chopped V/2 cups of sour milk 

Mix thoroughly, adding raisins last. Bake slowly one hour or 
more. 

ONE EGG CAKE 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

34 cup of butter, creamed 1 egg 1 cup of sugar 

Beat white of egg until stiff; add yolk and beat again; then add 
to the butter and sugar. Add three-fourths cup of milk alter- 
nately with one and one-half cups of flour, sifted with two tea- 
spoons of baking powder, and last one teaspoon of vanilla. 

LIGHTNING CAKE 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

1 heaping cup of flour 1 level cup of sugar 

1 teaspoon of baking powder 

Sift all together three times. Into one-fourth cup of melted 
butter drop two eggs and fill cup with milk. Stir this into dry 
mixture and beat well. Bake in hot oven twenty to twenty- 
five minutes. 

VARIETY CAKE 

MRS. S. B. CAPEN 

V/2 cups of sugar % cup of butter 

% cup of milk 3 eggs 

1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 2 full cups of flour 
Y2 teaspoon of saleratus 

Bake two-thirds of this in two shallow cake pans. Spice the 
rest with one teaspoon of mixed spices ; add one-half cup of raisins, 
one-half cup of currants, and a little more flour, and bake in pan 
the size of the others. When cold put the three together with jelly. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 93 

BIRTHDAY CAKE 

MRS. EDWARD B. LANE 

Y2 cup of butter 1 cup of sugar 

4 egg yolks Y cup of milk 

Y cup of cornstarch 1 cup of flour 

Y2 teaspoon of flavoring YL teaspoon of salt 

Cream the butter and sugar ; add egg yolks, beaten well, flavor- 
ing, and milk; sift in dry ingredients. 

WARREN'S CAKE 

MRS. A. N. BROUGHTON 

2 eggs 1 cup of sugar 

1 cup of flour Y CU P of n °t water 

2 teaspoons of baking powder 

Beat the eggs well together; add the sugar, then the flour, sifted 
with baking powder, and last the water. Bake at once. 

WELLESLEY FUDGE CAKE 

MRS. EDWARD B. LANE 

1 cup of sugar % cup of butter 

1 cup of milk 2Y cups of flour 

Y CU P °f chocolate, melted over Y2 cup of English walnuts, 
hot water broken coarsely 

1 heaping teaspoon of baking 3 eggs 

powder 

Cream sugar and butter, add milk, and stir in lightly the flour, 
sifted with baking powder. Stir in the chocolate, add nuts, and 
eggs, beaten separately. 

Fudge Frosting 

\Yi tablespoons of butter Y cup of cocoa 

\Y cups of confectioner's sugar Y CU P of milk 
Yi teaspoon of vanilla Few grains of salt 

Melt the butter; add the cocoa, sugar, salt, and milk; bring 
to boiling point and boil about eight minutes. Remove from 
fire and beat quickly until creamy. Add vanilla and pour over 
the cake about one-fourth inch thick. 



94 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE 

MRS. N. J. MARSHALL 

Dissolve two squares of chocolate in five tablespoons of boiling 
water. Cream one-half cup of butter, adding gradually one 
and one-half cups of sugar. Add the yolks of four eggs, beat 
thoroughly, and add the chocolate, one-half cup of cream or 
.milk, one and three-fourth cups of flour sifted with two rounding 
teaspoons of baking powder, and one teaspoon of vanilla. Stir in 
carefully the stiffly beaten whites and bake, either in a loaf or 
thin layer cake pans. 

Icing 

Melt two squares of chocolate (put no water to it) ; add one cup 
of sugar and white of one egg. 

CHOCOLATE CAKES 

MRS. M. W. RICHARDSON 

\}/2 cups of sugar J^ cup of butter 

2 eggs 2 squares of Baker's chocolate, 
1 cup of thick sour milk melted over hot water 

3^2 teaspoon of soda 2 cups of flour sifted with 2 tea- 

1 cup of broken walnut meats spoons of baking powder and 

a pinch of salt 

Cream butter and sugar, add eggs, well beaten, and beat in 
melted chocolate. Dissolve soda in one-fourth cup of boiling water 
and add to sour milk, stirring briskly; add to mixture with flour 
and baking powder. When well beaten stir in nuts which have 
been floured. Put a walnut meat on top of each cake before 
baking. 

One-half this rule makes sixteen cakes. Can be made as loaf 
cake if desired. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

MRS. EATON 

3 squares of chocolate Y^ cup of sugar Y% CU P of sweet milk 
Boil until thick and set to cool. Cream one-half cup of butter 

and one cup of sugar and break two eggs into this. Add one-half 
cup of sour milk, one level teaspoon of soda, and two cups of 
sifted pastry flour. Beat well and add to chocolate mixture. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 95 



SPONGE CAKE PUFFS 

MISS HELEN T. COMINS 

Beat whites of two eggs very light and add the beaten yolks. 
Sift in carefully one-half cup of granulated sugar and flavor with 
lemon or vanilla. Mix in thoroughly one-half cup of sifted flour 
and bake in custard cups. 



SPONGE CAKE. "Good" 

S. G. C. 

1 cup of sugar 3 eggs 

1 cup of flour 2 tablespoons of boiling water 

2 teaspoons of baking powder 

Beat yolks and whites separately and add whites just before 
putting in the oven. Bake in a moderate oven. 



SPONGE CAKE 

MRS. C. E. KENDRICK 

Yolks of 4 eggs 1 cup of sugar 

3 tablespoons of cold water V/2 tablespoons of cornstarch in 

13^2 teaspoons of baking powder a cup. Fill cup with flour 
J4 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of lemon juice 

Whites of 4 eggs, beaten stiff 



SPONGE CAKE 

C. M. R. 

5 eggs 1 cup of sugar 

Scant 3^2 cup of potato flour 3^2 teaspoon of baking powder 

Juice of Y2 lemon 
Beat yolks separately five minutes; add sugar and beat five 
minutes more. Add lemon juice; mix and sift flour and baking 
powder and beat in with spoon. Beat whites very stiff with pinch 
of salt and stir in last. Bake in moderate oven half an hour. 



g6 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

SPONGE CAKE 

A. N. W. 

1 cup of sugar 5 eggs 
Juice and grated rind of J/£ lemon 1 cup of flour 

Beat sugar, lemon, and yolks of eggs together and add stiffly 
beaten whites. Add the flour and fold all together lightly with a 
wooden spoon. Bake in a moderate oven about one hour. 

SPONGE CAKE. "Excellent" 

"north billerica" 

Six eggs, whites beaten separately; juice of one lemon put into 
the egg and one and one-half cups of sugar; two cups of flour. 

ORANGE CAKE 

MISS ROSAMOND MAY 

\}/2 cups of sugar and % cup of Juice and rind of 1 orange 

butter, creamed together lj^ teaspoons of baking powder, 

Yolks of 3 eggs, beaten sifted in the flour 

% cup of milk 2 scant cups of flour 

Whites of 2 eggs, beaten stiff 

Mix in order given and bake in two pans. 

Frosting 

White of one egg, saved from cake, beaten stiff; add juice and 
rind of orange (if orange is large take out one tablespoon of juice 
and some rind from orange used for cake). Add enough confec- 
tioner's sugar to make stiff. Put two cakes together with frosting 
between and on top. 

SPICE CAKE 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

2 cups of sugar 2 cups of sour milk 
2 cups of raisins, chopped 4 cups of flour 

2 teaspoons of soda 1 egg 

1 cup of butter 1 teaspoon of all kinds of spices, 

mixed 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 



97 



Mix spices with sugar and then cream with butter; add soda to 
milk and then to first mixture, with beaten egg. Add flour and 
last the fruit. 



SPICED FRUIT CAKE 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 



lj^ cups of brown sugar 
1 cup of sour milk 
3 eggs 

Y2 teaspoon of clove 
1 cup each of currants and 
raisins 



1 cup of butter 
2}/2 cups of flour 
1 teaspoon of nutmeg, cinna- 
mon, and allspice 
1 teaspoon of soda 
A little citron 



FRENCH SPICE CAKE 



MRS. CAMPBELL 

Y2 cup of butter 
1 cup of chopped raisins 
34 teaspoon of cinnamon 
}/2 teaspoon of clove 



1 cup of sugar 

3 eggs, beaten stiff 

1 teaspoon of lemon extract 

J4 teaspoon of nutmeg 

}/& teaspoon of allspice 

Mix well and add : 
3^j cup of milk 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 

1% cup of pastry flour 3^ teaspoon of soda 

Bake about forty-five minutes. 



13^ cups of butter 
V/2 CU P S of molasses 

4 eggs 

5 cups of flour 

1 pound of raisins 
134 pounds of citron 
A little lemon juice 



HARRISON CAKE 

MISS EMILY KNIGHT 



V/2 cups of sugar 
1 cup of milk 
1 teaspoon of soda 
1 pound of currants 
All kinds of spices 
A little wine 



98 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

ANGEL CAKE 

MISS EMILY KNIGHT 

Whites of 11 eggs 13^ cups of granulated sugar 

1 cup of pastry flour, measured 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar, 

after being sifted 4 times sifted in flour 

1 teaspoon of vanilla 

Beat the whites to a stiff froth, beat sugar into the egg, and 
add the seasoning and flour, stirring quickly and lightly. Beat 
until ready to put the mixture in the oven. Do not grease the 
pan. Bake forty minutes in a moderate oven. After baking turn 
the pan upside down on the table, so that a current of air will 
pass under and over it. 

ANGEL CAKE 

MRS. H. M. PARSHLEY 

Heat one cup of milk to boiling point. Sift together four times : 
1 cup of flour 1 cup of sugar 

3 good teaspoons of baking Pinch of salt 

powder 
Pour boiling milk into this mixture and stir until smooth; then 
without stirring fold in carefully the stiffly beaten whites of two 
eggs. Bake in an ungreased tin in a moderate oven. 

REAL SCOTCH SHORT CAKE 

; J j " MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

One cup of brown sugar and two cups of butter, creamed to- 
gether; then work in four cups of flour. It should be very stiff. 
Roll out, on brown paper, about an inch thick. Mark into squares, 
put paper and all into shallow pan, and bake slowly until done. 

RAISIN CAKE 

L. C. 

1 cup of butter 4 eggs 

3 cups of sugar 4 cups of flour 

1 cup of sour milk 1 teaspoon of soda in milk 

1 pound of raisins 1 tablespoon of brandy or wine (if 

Clove and cinnamon put in add a little more flour) 

A little citron if desired 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 99 

LADY GLADYS CAKE 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

2 cups of brown sugar 1 cup of butter 

1 cup of cold water 3 cups of flour 

3 eggs % teaspoon each of clove, cin- 

2 heaping cups of raisins, seeded namon, and nutmeg 

and chopped very fine 2 teaspoons of baking powder 



APPLE CAKE 

MRS. BENJAMIN H. BAILEY 

1 cup of sugar Y2 cup of butter 

Y2 cup of milk 2 eggs 

1 teaspoon of soda and 2 tea- 3 apples, sliced thin and stirred 

spoons of cream of tartar sifted in last 

with 23^2 cups of flour 

Good eaten warm. 

NUT CAKE 

MRS. C. E. KENDRICK 

Y cup of butter % cup of milk, added alternately 

V/2 cups of sugar, added grad- with 2 cups of flour, sifted 

ually with 2 level teaspoons of bak- 

1 cup of nut meats, chopped ing powder 

Whites of 4 eggs, beaten dry 

Bake in shallow pan thirty or forty minutes. 

DEVIL CAKE 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

2 squares of chocolate 1 egg Y cup of milk 
Boil until like custard, then add: 

1 cup of sugar 1 tablespoon of butter 

Yi cup of milk 1 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 

XYi cups of bread flour milk 

Vanilla 

Bake in slow oven and cover with boiled frosting. 



ioo THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

MEDWAY GINGER CAKE 

MRS. EVERIT 

\}/2 cups of black molasses 1 cup of sugar 

}/2 cup of butter 3^ CU P of lard 

2 eggs, well beaten 3 cups of flour 

1 dessertspoon of ginger % dessertspoon of cinnamon 

1 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 1 cup of water 

Spread thin and bake in quick oven. When done sprinkle with 
sugar. 

LACE CAKES, 

MRS. GEORGE W. ROLLINS 

1 scant cup of sugar 1 heaping teaspoon of baking 

1 teaspoon of vanilla powder 

1 tablespoon of melted butter Pinch of salt 
$* &AJ&2 2 Y2 cups of Quaker oats 

\ 
IRISH POUND CAKE 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

2 cups of sugar 1J/2 CU P S of butter 

1 cup of molasses 1 cup of coffee or milk 
4 eggs 4J^ cups of flour 

2 teaspoons each of clove, all- 1 teaspoon of soda 
spice, nutmeg, and cinnamon 1 pound of currants 

1 pound of raisins 1 pound of citron 

Bake two hours. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE 

MRS. EVERIT 

1 tablespoon of butter 1 scant cup of milk 

2 cups of sugar Whites of 3 eggs 

3 cups of flour 1 teaspoon of salt 
3 teaspoons of baking powder 1 quart of berries 

Sift salt and baking powder through stiff batter, made of pre- 
ceding ingredients, and add berries last. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 101 

BLUEBERRY CAKE 

MRS. CAMPBELL 

1 egg 1 cup of sugar 

2 cups of pastry flour Y cup of melted butter 

Yi cup of milk 2 teaspoons of baking powder 

V/<L cups of berries 3^2 teaspoon of cinnamon 

SOUR MILK CAKE 

MRS. PAUL A. PETERS 

Beat to a cream four tablespoons of butter and one cup of 
sugar. Add one teaspoon of soda, dissolved in one cup of sour 
milk, one teaspoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of clove, a little 
nutmeg, two cups of flour, one cup of raisins, and one-fourth 
cup of citron. Bake thirty minutes. 

MOIST CAKE 

MRS. ANDREW J. PETERS 

\}/2 cups of sugar 3^2 CU P of butter 

3 eggs % cup of water 
V/2 teaspoons of vanilla 2 cups of flour 

Good for dessert, hot, with cream. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE 

MRS. THOMAS G. REES 

Filling 

Grated rind and juice of 1 lemon Y2 CU P of sugar 

1 egg 1 teaspoon of butter 

Scant half cup of cold water 1 tablespoon of flour 
Mix and boil until it thickens. 

Cake 

1 scant cup of sugar Good Y CU P of butter 

Yolks of 2 eggs Y cup of milk, put in gradually 

1% cups of flour, put in gradually 13^ teaspoons of baking powder 
J/2 teaspoon of vanilla Whites of 2 eggs, beaten to a 

stiff froth and added last 
Bake in shallow pans and put together with the above filling. 



ro^ 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



A GOOD DARK CAKE 

MRS. T. W. TUCKER 



1 cup of sugar 
3^2 cup of butter 
23^ cups of flour 

1 cup of raisins 
Pinch of salt 

2 eggs 



1 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 
1 cup of molasses 

Y2 CU P of thick sour milk 

1 teaspoon each of clove, cinna- 
mon, and mace 

1 cup of currants 



JELLY ROLLS 

BARONESS VON SCHOLLEY 

1 ounce of sugar 2 eggs 1 ounce of flour 

Mix sugar and egg yolks, then flour, and add whites of eggs, 
beaten dry. Spread on tin, bake ten minutes in moderate oven, 
spread with jelly, roll, turn edges, and roll in sugar while warm. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE 

MRS. F. E. BRIDGMAN 

1 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 
1 teaspoon of water 

1 cup of unsweetened apple 
sauce 

A little nutmeg 



Y<L cup of butter 
2 scant cups of flour 
}/2 teaspoon of cinnamon 
}/2 teaspoon of clove 
1 cup of raisins 



1 cup of sugar 

After dissolving soda put into apple sauce and stir well before 
adding it to other mixture. 



ALMOND CAKE 

MRS. CAMPBELL 



1 cup of sugar and }/2 cup of 

butter, creamed together 
Yolks of 5 eggs 
\% cups of pastry flour 
Y2 teaspoon of soda 
}/2 cup of milk 



1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 
1 teaspoon of almond extract 
1 cup of blanched almonds, cut 

in strips and put on top of 

cake 



Sprinkle with sugar and bake about forty minutes. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 103 

CUP CAKES 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

1 cup of butter 3 cups of pastry flour, sifted with 

3 eggs 3 level teaspoons of baking 
13^2 cups of sugar powder 

Y2 CU P of milk 1 teaspoon of flavoring 

After baking in small cups dust the top of each cake with 
powdered sugar. 

GINGERBREAD 

MRS. ANDREW J. PETERS 

3^ cup of butter 1 cup of sugar 

Y2 cup of molasses 1 cup of milk 

1 teaspoon of ginger 1 teaspoon of clove 

1 teaspoon of cinnamon % teaspoon of soda 
Pinch of salt 2 x /i cups of flour 

GINGERBREAD 

MRS. W. B. RUSSELL 

2 cups of molasses J/2 cup of butter 

4 cups of flour 1 cup of sour milk 

1 teaspoon of soda 2 teaspoons of ginger 

Pinch of salt Pinch of cinnamon 

Dissolve soda in milk and put half of flour in molasses and 
butter before putting in soda and milk. 

Serve hot with whipped cream or frost with a cocoanut icing. 

FAIRY GINGERBREAD 

MRS. GEORGE W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Rub one cup of butter to a cream, add gradually two cups of 
sugar, and beat very light. Then add one teaspoon of ginger, one 
cup of milk in which three-fourths teaspoon of soda has been dis- 
solved, and finally four or four and one-half cups of flour. Spread 
very thin on buttered pans and bake in a moderate oven until 
brown. 



104 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

GINGERBREAD 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

1 cup of molasses 1 cup of sour milk 

1 teaspoon of soda % cup of butter 

2 }/2 CU P S of flour 1H teaspoons of ginger 
% cup of sugar 

HELEN'S GINGERBREAD 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

1 egg, well beaten 2 tablespoons of sugar 

}/2 pint of sour cream 1J4 CU P S of flour 

% cup of darkest molasses 3^2 teaspoon of ginger 

]/2 teaspoon of cinnamon 1 teaspoon of soda 

DOUGHNUTS. "Good" 

MRS. F. E. BRIDGMAN 

1 cup of sugar 1 teaspoon of butter 

1 egg 1 cup of sour milk 

Nutmeg Pinch of mustard (prevents 

1 teaspoon of soda soaking of fat) 

13^ teaspoons of cream of tartar Flour to roll 

DOUGHNUTS 

MRS. GEORGE W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

13^ cups of sugar 2 eggs 

1 cup of milk A little nutmeg 

2 teaspoons of butter 1 teaspoon of salt 

3 heaping teaspoons of baking Flour to roll 
powder 

BUTTER CAKES 

MRS. W. B. RUSSELL 

1 cup of butter 2 cups of brown sugar 

1 egg 2 tablespoons of cinnamon 

3 cups of flour 

Roll one-fourth inch thick and bake in hot oven until brown. 
" Delicious with afternoon tea." 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 105 

DEVIL'S FOOD. "BROWNIES" 

MRS. CAMPBELL 

1 cup of sugar 3^ cup of melted butter 

2 eggs, well beaten 2 squares of chocolate 

1 cup of walnuts 1 cup of flour (generous) 

Spread one-half inch thick in two pans and bake in moderate 
oven. Do not bake it hard. Should be soft when done. Can be 
made as "Brownies." 

BROWNIES 

MISS ROSAMOND MAY 

1 c\ip of sugar J^ cup of butter 

2 eggs, not beaten separately 2 squares of melted chocolate 
}/2 cup of English walnuts or % cup of flour 

pecans, chopped 1 teaspoon of vanilla 

Pour into shallow pan to about one-half inch thickness, and 
bake in a moderate oven twenty-five minutes. Cut when cool into 
finger-shaped pieces. 

JUMBLES 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

Y% CU P of butter and 1 cup of 34 cup of milk 

sugar, creamed together 3 cups of flour, sifted with 4 tea- 

2 eggs, well beaten spoons of baking powder, and 

% teaspoon of nutmeg 

Roll out one-half inch thick, brush with egg, and sprinkle 
with sugar. Bake on buttered sheets, about ten minutes, in 
hot oven. 

GINGER SNAPS. "Good" 

S. G. C. 

1 cup of molasses 1 cup of sugar 

1 cup of butter or other short- 1 egg 

ening 1 teaspoon of vinegar 

1 teaspoon of ginger 2 tablespoons of boiling water 

1 teaspoon of soda Flour enough to roll out 



io6 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



HERMITS 



s. 



1J^ cups of sugar 
Y% cup of soUr milk 
2 eggs 
Y2 cup of butter 



G. C. 

Y teaspoon each of cinnamon, 

clove, and nutmeg 
Y2 teaspoon of soda 
% cup of raisins 
3 scant cups of flour 

If sweet milk is used substitute two even teaspoons of baking 
powder. 

HERMITS 

L. C. 

J^cup of butter 2 eggs 

1 cup of sugar 1 heaping teaspoon of baking 

1 tablespoon of milk powder 

1 cup of chopped raisins Flour to roll out 

Roll out thin and bake ten minutes. 



HERMITS 

G. G. N. 



Yl cup of sugar 

Y cup of butter 
4 egg 

Y cup of dried currants 

Y cup of chopped raisins 
Chill dough, before using. 



Y teaspoon each of cinnamon, 
nutmeg, allspice, and soda 

^teaspoon each of clove and 
mace 

Flour to roll out 



2 cups of sugar 
1 cup of raisins 

3 cups of flour 
1 cup of butter 
1 nutmeg 



HERMITS 

HELEN TREAD WELL 



Y teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 

3 tablespoons of milk 
3 eggs 
1 teaspoon each of clove and 

cinnamon 



Roll one-fourth inch thick and bake in quick oven. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 107 



CHOCOLATE COOKIES 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

y<L cup of butter 2 squares of chocolate (Baker's), 

1 cup of sugar melted with 4 tablespoons of 

1 tablespoon of milk sugar and a little water 

2 eggs Flour to spread and a little cin- 

namon 
Mix in order given. Spread on sheets of tin and bake in slow 
oven. Cut in squares while hot. 

CHOCOLATE KISSES 

M. C H. 

White of 1 egg, beaten stiff, not 1 cup of powdered sugar 
dry J/£ teaspoon of vanilla 

Y2 teaspoon of flour 2 squares of chocolate, melted 

Mix chocolate with sugar and flour; add vanilla and egg. Form 

with fingers and bake fifteen minutes in a rather quick oven. 

CHOCOLATE PUFFS 

MISS L. M. HEWINS 

Beat well the whites of two eggs and add one-half pound of 
sugar. Scrape very fine one and one-half ounces of chocolate, 
dredge with flour, mix well, and add to eggs and sugar. 

Place on buttered tins thin spots of sugar about the size of a 
half dollar. Pile a portion of the mixture upon each spot, sift 
over them fine white sugar, and bake a few minutes in a quick 
oven. 

CHOCOLATE DROP WAFERS 

MRS. B. L. PRATT 

2 squares of chocolate 1 rounded tablespoon of butter 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of flour 

1 teaspoon of vanilla }/% teaspoon of baking powder 

Melt the chocolate and butter together and break the eggs into 
this mixture. Add other ingredients. Drop on buttered tins 
with teaspoon, making wafers about the size of macaroons. Bake 
in moderate oven. 



108 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

COOKIES. Plain or Fruit 

MARY IRVING 

2 pounds of flour 1 pound of butter 
% pound of brown sugar 4 eggs 

3 teaspoons of baking powder 1 teaspoon of vanilla 

Rub well together the butter, sugar, and flour, sifted with bak- 
ing powder, and mix with eggs and vanilla. To put in fruit, roll 
half the dough fairly thin, sprinkle with currants, then roll again 
until as thin as desired. 

SUGAR COOKIES 

MRS. W. O. WITHERELL 

One-half cup of butter, creamed with one cup of sugar. Add two 
eggs, well beaten, and one-half teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 
three tablespoons of milk. Flour to roll thin. 

DROP CAKES 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

Y2 cup of butter 1 cup of sugar 

1 tablespoon of molasses J^ cup of milk 

1 egg }/2 teaspoon each of cinnamon, 
1% cups of flour nutmeg, and allspice 

1 cup of chopped walnuts or 2 teaspoons of baking powder 
raisins 

MOLASSES DROP CAKES 

MISS ROSAMOND MAY 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of butter 

2 eggs, yolks and whites beaten 1 cup of boiling water 
together 2 teaspoons each of soda, ginger, 

2 cups of dark molasses salt, and cinnamon 

6 cups of sifted flour 1 tablespoon of cooking Sherry 

Mix well and drop from teaspoon on buttered tins. Bake only 
enough for one serving. Save dough in ice chest and bake fresh 
another time. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 109 

DROP MOLASSES COOKIES 

MRS. C. H. SOUTHER 

Boil together for one minute one cup of butter, one cup of mo- 
lasses, and one cup of sugar. When cool add one-half cup of milk, 
one-half teaspoon of soda, and two and one-half cups of flour. 
Drop a teaspoonful at a time, far apart, on tins and bake in a quick 
oven. 

DROP MOLASSES COOKIES 

MISS MARGARET MORSE 

V/2 cups of molasses 1 cup of flour 

2 scant tablespoons of butter 1 teaspoon of ginger 

1 teaspoon of soda 

Boil molasses ten minutes, then add other ingredients and 
beat. Drop on tins a teaspoonful at a time, two inches apart, and 
bake in a slow oven. 

SPICE DROP CAKES 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

^ cup of butter % salt spoon each of clove, nut- 

^ cup of raisins, chopped fine meg, mace, and allspice 

cup of flour 1 egg, well beaten 

^ cup of milk 1 teaspoon of baking powder 

^ cup of sugar 4 tablespoons of milk 

}/% teaspoon of cinnamon 

Cream butter; add sugar gradually and raisins, then egg. Mix 
and sift dry ingredients and add to fruit mixture with milk. 
Drop small spoonfuls on buttered tins and bake twelve or fifteen 
minutes in slow oven. 

PEANUT COOKIES 

H. L. P. 

Cream together three tablespoons of peanut butter, one table- 
spoon of butter, and one and one-half cups of sugar. Mix well with 
two unbeaten eggs; add three tablespoons of sour milk in which 
one-half teaspoon of soda is dissolved. Beat in flour enough to 
roll. Bake in hot oven. 



no THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

BROWN SUGAR DROP CAKES 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

2 cups of brown sugar Y% cup of butter 

1 egg Y^ cup of hot water 

1 level teaspoon of soda 1 teaspoon of vanilla 

3 cups of flour 1 cup of chopped nut meats 

Drop from teaspoon on tins and bake in oven. 

PEANUT WAFERS 

L. C. 

1 cup of sugar 2 tablespoons of butter 

1 egg 2 tablespoons of milk 

Y2 teaspoon of soda 1 cup of flour 

1 cup of chopped peanuts Pinch of salt 

Drop from teaspoon on a greased pan and bake a few minutes. 

The flour should make a stiff paste. 

One quart of peanuts makes one cup, shelled and chopped. 

PEANUT CRACKERS 

MRS. EDWARD B. LANE 

Whites of 2 eggs, beaten stiff 1 cup of peanuts, chopped fine 

1 cup of powdered sugar 

Mix thoroughly, spread on saltine crackers, and brown in oven. 
This quantity makes about three dozen. 

SPICE COOKIES 

M. C. L. 

1 cup of butter 2 cups of dark-brown sugar 

2 egg yolks 2 teaspoons of cinnamon 
1 teaspoon of cloves 3 cups of flour 

}/i teaspoon each of ginger, nut- % cup of milk 

meg, and salt 1 teaspoon of soda in the milk 

1 cup each of nuts and raisins, 2 egg whites, beaten stiff and 
chopped added last 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 



in 



"EXTRA FINE" MOLASSES COOKIES 



MRS. ANDREW J. PETERS 

3 tablespoons of lard 
Pinch of salt 

3 tablespoons of hot water 
1 teaspoon of cream of tartar 
3^2 teaspoon each of clove and 
cinnamon 



2 full cups of butter 

1 cup of sugar 

1 cup of molasses 

1 teaspoon of soda 

1 teaspoon of ginger 

7 scant cups of sifted flour 

Put part of butter and lard into molasses and bring to boiling 
point. Mix the rest of butter with the sugar and turn boiling 
molasses onto it. Mix the soda with the hot water, rinse out the 
molasses pan, and add to mixture. Add enough flour to mix, and 
put on ice for one or two days before using. Pound out and roll 
very thin. Bake on tins and cut after cooking. 

These cookies will keep crisp a long time. 



% pound of butter 
2 eggs 

Flour to roll out 
Peel of 1 lemon 



ALMOND COOKIES 

MISS SCHIRMER 



1 pound of sugar 

J^ pound of shelled almonds, cut 

fine 
Y2 teaspoon of baking powder 



Cream the butter and sugar, add eggs and beat, then add 
almonds and lemon. Add baking powder to flour and roll. Bake 
in a moderate oven. 



SAND TARTS 



1 pound of sugar 

x /i pound of blanched almonds 

Cinnamon 



MRS. BALDERSTON 

34 pound of butter 

1 pound of flour 

2 eggs 

Leave out the white of one egg. Mix sugar and butter, then 
eggs and flour. Roll out thin and cut. Brush over each cake 
with white of egg. Bake on iron sheet. Take out of oven and 
sprinkle each piece with granulated sugar and cinnamon, and 
cover with chopped almonds the last thing. 



H2 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

PEANUT BUTTER COOKIES 

M. C. L. 

1 cup of peanut butter 1 cup of sugar 

2 tablespoons of milk 3^2 teaspoon of cream of tartar 
34 teaspoon of soda Flour to stiffen 

Roll thin, place a half peanut on each cookie, and bake on but- 
tered tins. 

THIN ALMOND COOKIES 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

Y<l cup of butter 1 cup of flour 

1 cup of powdered sugar Not quite 3^2 CU P of milk 

Cream butter and sugar together, add milk and flour. Spread 
the mixture on sheets, sprinkle with chopped almonds (or shredded 
cocoanut), and bake in a slow oven. While hot cut into squares. 



DATE MACAROONS 

S. S. B, 

Beat whites of four eggs very stiff; add one pound of sifted 
powdered sugar, one pound of chopped dates, and one-half pound 
of chopped almonds. Stir well, then drop by teaspoonfuls, one 
and one-half inches apart, on buttered and floured pans and bake 
in a slow oven. 

BROWN BETTIES 

MARY IRVING 

1 cup of butter 1 cup or more of chopped nuts 

2 eggs 3 teaspoons of baking powder 



1 eggs o teaspoons oi uanii 

2 cups of raisins 1 teaspoon of lemon 
2 tablespoons of milk Enough sifted flour 
4 tablespoons of molasses very stiff batter ( 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon any drop cakes rec 

1 cup of brown sugar 

2 cups of currants 

RqItp in nanc a toe 



Enough sifted flour to make a 
very stiff batter (as thick as 
any drop cakes require) . Test 
one first 



Bake in pans, a teaspoonful to each cookie. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 113 

TEA KISSES 

MRS. ANDREW J. PETERS 

1 cup of sugar 1 level teaspoon of cream of 

2 tablespoons of milk tartar 

Yl level teaspoon of soda 1 teaspoon of lemon juice extract 

2 eggs, beaten lightly 2 cups of flour or a little more 

3^2 cup of butter 

Drop by teaspoonfuls on a flat tin, put a raisin on top of each 
and a little granulated sugar. Have a quick oven and watch them. 

SOUR MILK COOKIES 

E. B. G. 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of molasses 

% cup of shortening 1 egg 

% cup of sour cream or milk 1 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 

1 heaping teaspoon of ginger milk 

1 heaping teaspoon of salt 1 heaping teaspoon of cinnamon 

Flour to roll out 

CRY BABIES 

MRS. PAUL A. PETERS 

1 cup of molasses 1 cup of sugar 

1 egg Y2 CU P of butter 

3/2 cup of lard or drippings 1 teaspoon of cinnamon 

3/£ teaspoon of cloves Y teaspoon of salt 

2 teaspoons of soda 1 cup of milk 

1 cup of raisins 4J^ cups of flour 

Drop from teaspoon. 

COFFEE COOKIES 

MRS. C. E. KENDRICK 

1 cup of coffee Yi CU P each of butter and lard 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of molasses 

1 teaspoon of soda Y teaspoon of ginger 

Pinch of salt Flour to roll 

Sprinkle with sugar before baking. 



H4 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

CINCINNATI COOKIES 

MRS. H. B. CHAPIN 

1 cup of butter 2 cups of sugar 

1 cup of milk 1 teaspoon of soda 

Cinnamon to taste Flour enough to roll very thin 

LEMON CHEESE CAKES 

MISS KATHARINE R. WENDELL 

1 pound of sugar 6 eggs 

J4 pound of butter Juice and finely grated rind of 3 

lemons 

Stir over a slow fire until the mixture thickens. Bake in a 
puff paste, adding at the time about six finely powdered crackers. 
After baking, lay over the top some finely cut pieces of citron or 
preserved lemon rind. 

H. O. MACAROONS 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

Cream two level tablespoons of butter and add one-half cup 
of sugar. Beat the yolks of two eggs with one-half cup of sugar 
and add to first mixture. Stir in two and one-half cups of H. O., 
mixed with two and one-half level teaspoons of baking powder and 
one-fourth teaspoon of salt. Flavor with one teaspoon of vanilla 
and fold in the whites of the eggs, beaten very dry. Drop with 
teaspoon half full on buttered tins, three inches apart, and bake 
in slow oven. Do not stir much after whites are in. 



MARGUERITES 

MRS. WILLIAM E. CHAMBERLIN 

One cup of sugar and one-half cup of water cooked to a thick 
syrup. Melt in it five marshmallows. Have the whites of two 
eggs beaten stiff and pour the liquid into them. Add two table- 
spoons of cocoanut, one cup of walnut meats, and flavor with 
vanilla. Spread on saltines and brown in a quick oven. 

This makes about forty. 



CAKES, COOKIES, AND GINGERBREADS 115 

MARGURIETS 

MRS. J. SIDNEY STONE 

Cook one cup of sugar and one-half cup of water without stirring 
until it strings from spoon. Pour over well-beaten white of one 
egg. Add one cup of chopped pecans. Spread on Saratoga Flake 
crackers and brown in oven. 

MARGUERITES 

MISS HELEN O. PENHALLOW 

2 eggs 1 cup of brown sugar 

Y2 cup of flour J4 teaspoon of baking powder 

3^ teaspoon of salt 1 cup of nut meats 

Beat eggs slightly and add remaining ingredients in order 
given. Fill small buttered tins two-thirds full of mixture and 
place nut on each. Bake in moderate oven fifteen minutes. 

COCOANUT CAKES 

MISS SCHIRMER 

Whites of 6 eggs 1 pound of powdered sugar 

1 pound of shredded cocoanut 

Beat eggs stiff, then add slowly sugar and cocoanut. Drop 
with teaspoon on buttered tin and bake in slow oven. 



CHAFING-DISH RECIPES 
MOCK CRAB 

G. G. N. 

Cook one teaspoon of finely chopped onion in two and one-half 
tablespoons of butter for five minutes. Add three tablespoons of 
flour and when well mixed stir in three-fourths cup of milk. 
When thick add: 

1 cup of corn 1Y teaspoons of Worcestershire 

Y teaspoon of mustard sauce 

Y teaspoon of pepper Y2 teaspoon of salt 

Few grains of cayenne 

When boiling add one beaten egg. Serve on thin crackers. 

EGGS WITH MACARONI 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Y CU P of milk 1 tablespoon of butter 

Yi cup of canned mushrooms 1 cup of cold boiled macaroni 

2 eggs Y^ teaspoon of salt 

1 saltspoon of pepper 

Heat the milk; add the butter, the mushrooms, cut fine, and 
the macaroni, then the beaten eggs. Stir over boiling water for 
ten minutes and season. 

CHEESE OMELET 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 tablespoon of butter 6 eggs 

Yl teaspoon of salt 1 saltspoon of pepper 

2 tablespoons of grated Swiss Parmesan cheese 
cheese 

Melt the butter. Beat the eggs thoroughly, adding the Swiss 
cheese, salt, and pepper, and pour into the chafing dish. When 
the edges are set lift the edge with a flexible knife and let the un- 
cooked egg run under. When firm let it brown on the bottom. 
Sprinkle salt and pepper on the top, fold over, and turn gently 

116 



CHAFING-DISH RECIPES 117 

onto a hot dish. Sprinkle the top lightly with a little Parmesan 
cheese. 

CREAMED MUSHROOMS 

MR. W. CLIFTON JONES 

Remove the stems and peel the mushrooms. Melt butter the 
size of an egg and place the mushrooms in the chafing dish with 
the gills up. Simmer until heated through; add salt and pepper, 
then one pint of milk with one teaspoon of flour stirred in it. 
Stir gently until it comes to a boil and serve on toast. 

Recipe of Somerset Club Chef 

MEXICAN EGGS 

MRS. E. L. YOUNG, JR. 

1 can of tomatoes 7 large eggs beaten with 2 table- 

1 onion, chopped fine spoons of flour 

Y2 pound of butter Salt and red pepper 

Cook over open fire in hot water pan. Fry the onion brown in 
a little butter, then add the rest of the butter and the tomatoes. 
Cook hard for fifteen minutes, then put in the beaten eggs, stirring 
fast all the time. Serve on crisped saltines. 

This is enough for twelve helpings. 

RINCTUM DIDDIE 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter, 1 cup of tomato 

add 2 tablespoons of flour 1 teaspoon of salt 

% cup of cream 3^ teaspoon of soda 

Speck of cayenne 

Stir until smooth and add one and one-half cups of cheese, cut 
fine. When melted shut off heat and add two eggs, slightly 
beaten. 

CREAMED SARDINES 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 small box of sardines 13^ cups of milk or cream 

1 tablespoon of butter 1 large tablespoon of flour 

2 tablespoons of lemon juice Speck of cayenne 



n8 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

Melt the butter, stir in the flour, and add the cream gradually. 
When smooth add the sardines, previously skinned, boned, and 
flaked with a fork. Heat, add cayenne and lemon juice and, if 
desired, the beaten yolks of two eggs. 

SHAD ROE 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 pair of shad roe 3 tablespoons of butter 

Salt and pepper Juice of % lemon 

Flour 1 teaspoon of chopped parsley 

Before cooking in the chafing dish cook the roe in boiling water 
for twenty minutes, drain, dredge well with flour, salt and pepper. 
Melt the butter and when hot saute the roe in the butter; just 
before serving add the lemon juice and parsley. 

CREAMED OYSTERS 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 pint of oysters 2 tablespoons of butter 

1 pint of cream or milk 2 tablespoons of flour 

Yz teaspoon of salt J^ teaspoon of celery salt 

Yi saltspoon of white pepper Dash of cayenne 

Melt the butter, add the flour, and when smooth add the cream 
gradually, stirring constantly. When smooth add the oysters, 
which have been cleaned, and cook until the edges curl. Add the 
seasoning and serve at once. 

OYSTERS IN CHAFING DISH 

MRS. S. W. ANDREW 

Put one quart of large oysters in the chafing dish without the 
hot water pan. When hot add two tablespoons of butter, one 
teaspoon of salt, and a shake of pepper. When oysters are plump 
put hot water pan underneath. Take out a little of the hot 
liquor and add to the beaten yolks of four eggs. Add this to the 
oysters with two tablespoons of lemon juice. Serve on hot 
crackers or toast. 



CHAFING-DISH RECIPES 119 

FRIED OYSTERS 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Clean and drain large oysters and sprinkle with salt and pepper. 
Roll them in crumbs, dip in beaten egg mixed with two table- 
spoons of milk, and roll in crumbs again. Cover the bottom of 
chafing dish with olive oil and when hot put in the oysters. Brown 
them carefully on each side and drain on paper. 

CREAMED LOBSTER 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Melt one tablespoon of butter, stir in one tablespoon of flour, 
add gradually one cup of milk and one-half cup of cream, and 
when smooth put in two pounds of lobster, cut in small pieces, 
one teaspoon of salt, and a little cayenne. Stir until heated 
through, add one tablespoon of lemon juice, and serve. 

For Curried Lobster add one teaspoon of curry powder to the 
flour. 

DEVILED ROAST BEEF 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 pint of cold roast beef, cut in 2 teaspoons of dry mustard 

pieces 1 inch square J^ saltspoon of cayenne 

1 teaspoon of salt Juice of J^ lemon 

1 tablespoon of butter Nutmeg 

Y2 cup of water 3^ cup of Madeira 

Cook together the butter, salt, cayenne, mustard, and lemon 
juice. Mix well, add the water and wine gradually and stir until 
smooth, then add the beef. Grate a little nutmeg over the top 
and cook until the meat is heated through. Add more seasoning 
if desired. 

VEAL AND ONIONS 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Melt two tablespoons of butter, stir in two tablespoons of flour, 
and add two cups of hot milk, gradually. When smooth add six 
small parboiled onions and stew five minutes with the cover on. 
Add one-half cup of chopped celery, thin slices of cold cooked veal, 



120 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

one teaspoon of salt, and one saltspoon of white pepper. Cook 
five minutes and serve. 

MOCK VENISON 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

1 slice of raw mutton 1 tablespoon of currant jelly 

}/2 tablespoon of butter J4 CU P of Madeira or Port wine 

Salt Cayenne 

Melt the. butter and when hot put in the mutton and cook a 
few minutes; season with salt and cayenne. Add the jelly and 
wine. Simmer a few minutes and serve. 

VENISON 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

No. i 

V/2 pounds of venison Butter the size of an egg 

Y2 tumbler of jelly Wineglass of Madeira wine 

Salt Pepper 

No. 2 

Remove meat from one can of mock turtle soup, heat the liquor 
and cook the venison in it, adding seasonings, wine, and jelly as 
above. 

CURRIED TOMATOES 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Melt two tablespoons of butter; add one teaspoon of chopped 
onion and one teaspoon of curry powder. When well mixed add 
tomatoes, turn them often, and cook until tender. Sprinkle with 
salt and serve. 

OYSTER RABBIT 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

3^ pint of oysters 3^ pound of cheese, broken in 

1 tablespoon of butter bits 

Y2 teaspoon of mustard 1 saltspoon of salt 

2 eggs }/2 teaspoon of paprika 



CHAFING-DISH RECIPES 12 1 

Clean and remove the hard muscle from the oysters, parboil 
them in their own liquor until their edges curl, and remove to a 
hot bowl. Put the butter, cheese, salt, mustard, and paprika in 
the chafing dish. While the cheese is melting beat the eggs slightly 
and add them to the oyster liquor. Mix this gradually with the 
melted cheese, add the oysters, and turn onto hot toast. 

See also recipes for Finnan Haddie and Welsh Rabbit. 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 

BOTTLING FRUIT 

Choose wide-mouthed bottles and clean them thoroughly. 
Pick just ripe fruit, clean, and dry. Place in bottles. Apples and 
pears should be sliced in quarters, plums and damsons put in 
whole. Fill the bottles with clean water and stand them up to 
their necks in a fish kettle or open boiler. The bottles must be 
open. Slowly bring the water to a boil and boil for twenty min- 
utes or half an hour. Take out the bottles singly, and without 
the smallest delay tie the mouths with clean bladder while the 
water in the bottles is at boiling heat. If corks are used instead of 
bladders, scald them first. Insert them and seal the tops with 
sealing or bottle wax. 

Remember to boil the water gradually. 

Store the bottles in any cool place. 

Blackberries can be preserved with a smaller quantity of sugar 
than other fruit. 

MUSTARD PICKLE 

MISS SCHIRMER 

4 quarts of small pickles 3 large cucumbers, sliced 

1 quart of green tomatoes, 1 quart of small onions 

chopped 1 cauliflower, broken in pieces 

4 green peppers, chopped 1 bunch of celery, cut in y% inch 

1 pint of salt in 1 gallon of boil- pieces 

ing water 

Let all stand over night and in the morning boil until tender 
and drain. 

Sauce 

1 cup of flour 1 cup of sugar 

6 tablespoons of mustard 1 tablespoon of turmeric 

2 quarts of vinegar 2 tablespoons of celery seed 

Mix flour, sugar, mustard, and turmeric, then add slowly vinegar 
enough to make smooth paste. Put paste in two quarts of hot 

122 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 123 

vinegar and bring to boil, then add pickle and celery seed and boil 
fifteen minutes. Put in jars and seal when cold. 

CHOW-CHOW 

MRS. G. E. BRIGHAM 

1 peck of green peppers 6 onions 

6 red peppers 3 bunches of celery 

6 cucumbers 

Wash all and prepare for meat chopper. Mix in kettle, cover 
with salt (about one cup), and let stand over night. In morning 
drain well. 

1 cup of sugar Whole mixed spices sewed in 5 

1 gallon of vinegar lace bags 

(Ask for whole mixed spices) 

Bring vinegar, spices, and sugar to boiling point, then add 
chopped pickle, and boil until tender. Add more sugar and salt 
later if necessary. 

PICCALILLI 

MISS A. E. MAYO r 

1 peck of green tomatoes 2 quarts of onions 

4 quarts of vinegar J4 tablespoon of cayenne 

34 tablespoon of ground mustard 1 teaspoon of turmeric 

2 pounds of brown sugar }/± pound of white mustard seed 
1 tablespoon of celery seed 1 tablespoon of ground cloves 
Y2 ounce of ground mace 3^ CU P of olive oil 

Slice tomatoes and onions very thin, sprinkle a little salt be- 
tween each layer (one cup in all), and let stand over night. Drain 
through a colander and put on to boil with enough vinegar to 
cover. Boil slowly until clear and tender, then drain from the 
vinegar. 

In two quarts of fresh vinegar put the sugar, mustard seed, 
mace, celery seed, and clove, let them boil for a few minutes, 
then pour over drained tomatoes, which have been mixed with 
the cayenne, ground mustard, and turmeric. Mix them well 
together and add the olive oil. Put in jars when cold. 

This makes a little over eight pint jars. 



124 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

MIXED MUSTARD PICKLE 

MRS. LILLIAN SHAW 

Separate two cauliflowers into tiny flowerets. Remove the 
seeds from one red and four green peppers and chop the pulp 
fine. Slice enough green tomatoes and large cucumbers to make 
one quart of each. Add one quart each of small whole cucumbers 
and small button onions. 

Mix the vegetables in a large granite or aluminum kettle and 
pour over them a brine made of four quarts of water and one 
pint of salt. Let stand twenty-four hours, then bring to scalding 
point, and drain through a colander. 

Mix one cup of flour, six tablespoons of ground mustard, and 
one level tablespoon of turmeric ; stir to a paste with cold vinegar. 
Add sugar (about two cups of brown and one cup of white) and 
stir, as it thickens, until smooth. Add the vegetables and cook 
until well heated through and soft. Turn into glass jars and seal 
as usual. 

This can be made of cauliflower, or string beans, celery, and 
cabbage may be used. 

SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLE 

MRS. B. H. BAILEY 

Slice three or four hundred medium-sized pickle cucumbers, 
sprinkle salt over each layer, and let stand twenty-four hours; 
then drain. To one gallon of vinegar allow: 
1 cup of olive oil 1 gill each of black and white 

34 pound of celery seed mustard seed 

Put sliced cucumbers in glass jars in layers, sprinkling black 
pepper and the mixed seed between. Over all, when the jar is 
nearly full, pour the mixed oil and vinegar to fill the jar. It 
should stand two or three months before using. 

CUCUMBER PICKLE 

MRS. E. U. HARRINGTON 

Slice thirty cucumbers very thin (not peeled) and soak in weak 
brine over night. In the morning drain, but do not wash. Let 
drain a half day. 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 125 

Mix one cup, very full, of olive oil, one-fourth cup each of black 
and white mustard seed, and two tablespoons of celery seed. 
Pour over drained cucumbers and stir hard, mixing well. Keep 
in a covered stone crock. Put in the pickle a piece of alum the 
size of a cherry. 

Fifteen cucumbers make about one gallon. 

CHILI SAUCE 

MRS. M. W. SHORE 

6 ripe tomatoes 2 large green peppers 

2 onions 4 tablespoons of white sugar 

2 cups of cider vinegar 1 tablespoon of salt 

Chop well and boil one hour. Bottle and seal tight. 

CHILI SAUCE 

MRS. CHARLES HILL 

24 large ripe tomatoes 6 green peppers 

4 large onions 3 tablespoons of salt 

8 tablespoons of brown sugar 4 cups of vinegar 

Chop pepper and onions very fine and add tomatoes cut up. 
Add one teaspoon of each kind of spice and boil gently one or two 
hours. 

CHILI SAUCE 

MISS KATHARINE R. WENDELL 

6 large ripe tomatoes 4 green peppers 

1 tablespoon of sugar 1 onion 

\]/2 cups of strong vinegar 1 tablespoon of salt 

Chop peppers and onion and boil all together for one hour. 

SWEET PICKLED PEARS 

MRS. HENRY L. RAND 

Peel the pears first and (unless very small ones) cut in thirds, 
leaving out cores. If very small pears they can be pickled whole. 
6 pounds of fruit (3 quarts) 8 dozen cloves 

3 pounds of sugar 1 quart of vinegar 



126 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

Put the vinegar, sugar, and cloves on the stove in large kettle ; 
when hot add the pears and cook until tender. 

SWEET PICKLED TOMATOES 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

1 peck of green tomatoes 6 large onions 

1 cup of salt 4 quarts of cider vinegar 

V/2 pounds of sugar 3^ pound of mustard seed 

1 tablespoon each of cloves, all- 1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper 
spice, ginger, and mustard, if desired hot 

ground 1 quart of vinegar 

2 quarts of water 

Slice the tomatoes and onions, sprinkle with salt, and let stand 
over night. Drain off the water, boil them in vinegar and water 
fifteen minutes, then drain well. Boil the four quarts of cider 
vinegar with the sugar and spices, add the pickles, and cook 
slowly twenty minutes. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKL# 

MRS. EDWARD B. LANE 

8 pounds of tomatoes 3 onions 

4 pounds of sugar 2 teaspoons of salt 

1 tablespoon of cinnamon 1 tablespoon of clove 

1 nutmeg, grated 1 gallon of cider vinegar 

Slice the tomatoes and onions rather thin. Boil the vinegar 
and sugar together and skim. Add the spices and last the tomatoes. 
Boil five minutes. 

VIRGINIA SWEETMEATS 

MRS. E. U. HARRINGTON 

Slice the watermelon rind and peel off the green. Put in brine 
strong enough to float an egg, and let stand a week or more. 
Take, out and put in fresh water, and change the water for three 
days until the brine is all out. Scald in alum water, using just 
alum enough to taste in water. Drop in cold water and let it stand 
twenty-four hours. Boil in ginger tea and drop in cold water 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 127 

again. Make a syrup of one pound of sugar and one pint of water 
to every pound of rind. Season with mace and cinnamon. Slice 
two lemons and boil in syrup. Cook until clear. 
Use white ginger root for the ginger tea. 

WATERMELON PICKLE 

MRS. EDGAR O. ACHORN 

Peel the green skin from watermelon rind and cut rind in pieces 
about an inch square. Soak over night in alum water to cover, 
using one tablespoon of powdered alum to one quart of water. 
In the morning pour off alum water and cover with clear water for 
two hours. Remove from water, put in preserving kettle, and 
cover with vinegar. Add two pounds of brown sugar to each 
quart of vinegar, and one-half package of whole mixed spices, tied 
in cheesecloth bag. Cook until watermelon is clear. 

This keeps well in a stone jar. 

In making a large quantity leave the spice bag in the pickle, 
but with a small quantity it is best to remove it. 

ORANGE MARMALADE 

MRS. WILLIAM F. HASTINGS 

1 large grapefruit 1 large lemon 1 large orange (Florida) 

Pare the fruit and put the peel through the coarse part of the 
meat chopper. Slice the orange and lemon very thin and fine 
and remove the pulp from the grapefruit. Mix all together with 
the peel and to every cup of the mixture add three cups of water. 
Let it stand over night and in the morning boil for fifteen minutes. 
Let it stand another night. The next morning add one cup of 
sugar to every cup of the mixture and boil until it thickens, about 
two hours. This should make about one dozen glasses. 

ORANGE MARMALADE 

MRS. C. E. KENDRICK 

Five oranges and one lemon. Allow three pints of water to 
one pound of fruit. Slice fruit thin in the evening; put water over 
fruit and let stand over night. In the morning boil three-quarters 



128 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

of an hour after it begins to boil. Let stand over night again. ' In 
the morning allow one and one-half pounds of sugar to each pound 
of fruit and juice. Boil three-quarters of an hour, or until it jells. 

PEACH AND ORANGE MARMALADE 

s. s. b. 

To twenty-five peaches, pared and sliced, add six seedless 
oranges, cut in halves and sliced in round pieces. Add three- 
fourths of a pound of sugar to one pound of fruit and let stand 
over night. Cook about three-quarters of an hour in the morning 
and put in glasses. 

PICKLED LIME MARMALADE 

MISS A. E. MAYO 

Wipe one dozen medium-sized green tomatoes and drain one 
dozen selected pickled limes. Force through a meat grinder, put 
in a saucepan, add six cups of sugar, bring to boiling point, and 
let simmer three hours. Fill jelly glasses with the mixture, cool, 
and seal. 

This makes about eleven glasses. 

GRAPEFRUIT MARMALADE 

MRS. EDGAR O. ACHORN 

To one medium-sized grapefruit, cut in thin slices, add one quart 
of cold water and let stand over night. Cook for half an hour, 
then add juice of two lemons and one scant quart of sugar. Cook 
for one hour or more. 

CRANBERRY MARMALADE 

MRS. CHARLES H. SOUTHER 

Wash three quarts of cranberries, barely cover with hot water, 
and cook until tender. Squeeze through strainer; add six pounds 
of warmed granulated sugar, two pounds of seeded and chopped 
raisins, juice and chopped rind of four large ripe oranges. Cook 
until rather thick and put in jelly glasses. Cover. 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 129 

GRAPE AND ORANGE MARMALADE 

MISS A. E. MAYO 

Four pounds of grapes, pulped. Cook pulp until soft, then put 
through colander to remove seeds. One pound of seedless 
raisins; two oranges, chopped fine, skin and all; three pounds of 
sugar. Add skins and pulp and cook half an hour. 

This makes thirteen glasses. 

APPLE CHUTNEY 

MRS. M. W. RICHARDSON 

Chop very fine twenty-four sour apples, two onions, and five 
peppers. Add one quart of vinegar and one cup of currant jelly 
and cook one hour. Add one package of chopped raisins, four 
cups of sugar, two tablespoons of ginger, one-half teaspoon of 
cayenne, two tablespoons of salt, and five tablespoons of lemon 
juice. Cook together one hour, stirring often. Seal. 

HEAVENLY HASH 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

1 box of currants 1 large orange 

1 cup of raisins 3 scant cups of sugar 

Boil slowly one hour or more. 

This makes about one quart. 

SPICED GRAPES 

MISS H. J. PEARCE 

8 pounds of pulped grapes 4 pounds of brown sugar 

1 cup of vinegar Cinnamon, mace, and cloves 

Scald the pulp and strain through a colander. Add the skins, 
sugar, and spices. Boil until thick; add vinegar and boil gently, 
stirring often until it thickens. (This scorches very easily.) 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES 

MRS. C HARRINGTON 

Weigh one pound of sugar to one pound of fruit. Put sugar in 
kettle with just water enough to prevent burning. Boil to a syrup 



13 o THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

and put in as many berries at a time as will cover the top of the 
syrup without crowding. Let them boil twenty minutes and take 
them out separately, so as not to break them. Put them in a dish 
to cool separately. 

GINGER PEARS 

"north billerica" 

8 pounds of pears, quartered 34 pound of Canton ginger 
and cut in small pieces 2 lemons, cut in small pieces and 

4 pounds of sugar . seeded 

1 quart of water 
Cook slowly three hours. 



GINGER PEARS 

MRS. GEORGE W. ROLLINS 

8 pounds of pears 6 pounds of sugar 

2 ounces of white ginger root 

Pare the fruit and cut it in halves. Make a syrup of sugar and 
water, using as little water as possible. Add ginger and pears and 
cook several hours, slowly. 

CRANBERRY CONSERVE 

S. S. B . 

Pick over and wash one quart of cranberries, put in a kettle 
with two-thirds cup of water, and boil until skins break. Strain 
and add one-fourth pound of seeded raisins, two-thirds cup of 
water, one-half pound of walnut meats, broken into fine pieces, 
one orange, cut fine, and one pound of sugar. Boil twenty minutes. 

BEACH PLUM MARMALADE 

M. C. L. 

Boil beach plums until soft and rub through a coarse strainer. 
To three cups of juice add four cups of sugar. Boil until ready to 
jell. 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 131 

PLUM CONSERVE 

M. C. L. 

3 pounds of plums, stoned before 3 pounds of sugar 
weighing 1 pound of English walnuts, cut 

3 oranges, ground, rind and all rather fine 

Juice of 3 lemons 
Cook for one hour without the sugar. Add sugar and cook 
slowly about two hours. 

One peck of plums weighs about ten pounds after being stoned. 

GRAPE CONSERVE 

MISS SCHIRMER 

5 pounds of Concord grapes 5 pounds of sugar 

2 pounds of seeded raisins 2 pounds of walnuts 

2 oranges 

Pulp grapes and boil pulps until soft; then strain and remove 
seeds. Add juice to skins; add raisins, orange pulp, and peel of 
orange, chopped fine. When boiling add the sugar and boil ten 
minutes; add walnuts, chopped fine, and boil five minutes more. 
Seal when cold. 

GRAPE JIM-JAM 

MRS. C. H. SOUTHER 

Crush five quarts of grapes in a preserving kettle, add two cups 
of water, and boil until fruit is well cooked; then strain. To 
two quarts of this juice add juice and finely chopped rind of two 
oranges and one pound of large seeded raisins ; boil twenty minutes. 
Add five and one-half pounds of white sugar, warmed in the 
oven, and boil five minutes. Turn into jelly glasses and when 
cool cover with paraffin. 

This served with game is especially fine. 

APPLE GINGER 

MRS. GEORGE HARRINGTON 

4 pounds of apples, cored, pared, Grated rind and juice of 3 lemons 

and cut in pieces 1 ounce of ginger root 

4 pounds of light-brown sugar Water to cover bottom of pan 
Cook slowly four hours, or until light and clear. 



i 3 2 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

RHUBARB CONSERVE 

"north billerica" 

Six pounds of rhubarb, cut as for sauce. Sprinkle over it five 
pounds of sugar and let stand over night. Add two lemons, sliced 
and cut fine, and two pounds of seeded raisins. Boil slowly four 
hours. 

JAPANESE KOTO 

MRS. M. W. RICHARDSON 

Cut five pounds of rhubarb stalks in inch pieces, add five 
pounds of sugar, and let stand over night. In the morning pour 
boiling water over 1}4 pounds of figs, cut them in pieces, and add 
to the rhubarb, with juice and grated rind of two lemons. Boil 
until thick. 

MACEDOINE 

A. I. FISKE 

2 boxes of currants 2 boxes of raspberries 

2 oranges 2 lemons 

% pound of raisins 

Mash the currants, after having washed and drained well, and 
extract the juice. Boil the refuse in about one pint of water until 
it becomes red. Strain and boil in this water the. orange and 
lemon skins, cleansed and ground, and the raisins, also ground. 
Add the lemon and orange juice. Clean the raspberries and boil 
until soft in a little water. Put all ingredients together and boil 
until there is not much liquid; then add an equal bulk of sugar 
and boil gently thirty minutes. 

COLD TOMATO RELISH 

M. C. L. 

One peck of ripe tomatoes. Peel, chop, and let stand over 
night. Add four green peppers, seeded and chopped, two cups of 
chopped celery, five ounces of white mustard seed, five onions, 
chopped very fine, one-half cup of salt, four cups of brown sugar, 
and five cups of vinegar. Stir all together thoroughly and put up 
cold. No cooking. 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 133 

BORDEAUX SAUCE 

MRS. E. PEABODY GERRY 

1 peck of green tomatoes 6 onions 

1 red and 2 green peppers 1 head of cabbage (2 pounds) 

Y2 cup of salt 

Boil until tender, drain, and add: 

3 pounds of brown sugar 1 tablespoon of whole allspice 

1 tablespoon of whole cloves 2 tablespoons of mustard seed 

1 bunch of celery 1}^ quarts of vinegar 

Cook until tender. 

PLUM CONSERVE 

MRS. CHARLES S. PENHALLOW 

Five pounds of eating plums; grated rind and juice of five 
oranges and one lemon ; one and one-half pounds of small seedless 
raisins (if large ones are used chop them) . Cut plums in halves and 
remove stones. Add raisins and grated rind and juice of oranges 
and lemon. Place on stove and cook slowly for one hour; then 
add three pounds of granulated sugar and cook slowly about 
two hours longer. 

MINT JELLY 

M. C. H. 

Soak one tablespoon of granulated gelatine in cold water 
enough to cover. Boil one cup of vinegar with one cup of sugar 
until it thickens slightly (about five minutes after it begins to 
boil). Add softened gelatine, one-fourth teaspoon each of salt 
and paprika, and stir until gelatine is dissolved. Add three-fourths 
cup of fresh mint leaves, finely chopped, set dish in iced water, 
and stir until it begins to thicken well; then pour into small molds. 
Serve with roast lamb. 

MINT JELLY 

MRS. A. N. BROUGHTON 

Wipe one peck of Porter apples, remove stems and blossom ends, 
and cut in eighths. Put in kettle, add two quarts of cold water, 
cover, and simmer until apples are soft. Mash, using a wooden 
potato masher, and drain through a coarse sieve. Allow juice to 
drip through several thicknesses of cheesecloth. Return juice to 
kettle and boil twenty minutes; then add an equal amount of 




134 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

heated sugar. Bring to boiling point and boil for five minutes. 
Take a large bunch of fresh mint; wash and bruise some of the 
leaves slightly by pressing between the fingers. Hold bunch by 
string and pass through and through the syrup until the desired 
strength of mint flavor is obtained. This process takes the last 
three minutes of the cooking. Add two tablespoons of lemon 
juice and color green, using vegetable green paste. Strain and 
turn into jelly glasses. Put in a sunny window and let stand for 
twenty-four hours. 

QUINCE JELLY 

J J I G. G. N. 

8 quinces ; use skin and cores as 2 quarts of cranberries 
well as flesh A little over 3 quarts of water 

Boil together, strain, and add an equal quantity of sugar. 

CURRANT JELLY ^^J^^^ y 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

To four quarts of currants on the stem add one quart of water 
and boil for thirty minutes. Drain through muslin over colander 
without squeezing. Measure one pint of juice to one pound of 
sugar. Boil juice fifteen minutes. Heat the sugar, add to juice, 
and boil five minutes. Strain into tumblers. 

TOMATO BUTTER 

MRS. T. G. REES 

7 pounds of pared ripe tomatoes 3 pounds of brown sugar 
1 pint of vinegar 1 ounce of powdered cinnamon 

3^2 ounce of whole cloves 
Simmer three hours. Keeps without sealing. 

TO COOK CRANBERRIES 

MRS. B. W. MUNROE 

Wash and drain the cranberries. Put them in a deep dish, pour 
boiling water over them, and let stand until sugar is boiled. Use 
one quart of sugar to three pints of cranberries. Boil the sugar, 
with quite a little water, to a syrup, not more than ten minutes. 
Drain the cranberries and pour them into the sugar; let them boil 



FRUITS, PICKLES, AND PRESERVES 135 

up once all over, then put into glass jars like any other preserve. 
Do not stir any more than is necessary. This is a quick way 
and keeps fruit from being mashed. 

CRANBERRY JELLY 

E. G. W. 

4 quarts of cranberries 1 quart of water 2 quarts of sugar 

Wash and pick over cranberries, put in kettle with water, and 
boil for ten minutes; then add sugar and boil six minutes more. 
Strain or not, as desired, and put in glasses. This will harden in a 
short time and turn out of mold in perfect shape. 

HORSE RADISH SAUCE 

MRS. WILLIAM PRATT 

Beat one-fourth pound of butter to a cream and mix with it one- 
fourth pint of cream, half a stick of horse radish, grated fine, 
pepper, salt, and white vinegar to taste. The sauce should be 
as thick as good cream and should be kept cool. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI 

See Pudding and Ice Cream Sauces. 

GRAPEFRUIT 

MRS. A. J. PETERS 

Prepare grapefruit. Cut out the fruit, sweeten, put back with 
white grapes and Maraschino cherries, and pour over a little 
cordial. 

FRUIT COCKTAIL 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

To Serve as First Course at Luncheon 

From the red part of a watermelon, the yellow part of a cante- 
loupe, and the white or light green part of an ordinary melon 
scoop out balls with a potato-ball cutter. Add Maraschino cher- 
ries, chill on the ice, heap in tall grapefruit glasses, and before 
serving pour over some of the Maraschino liquor or a little rum 
or Sherry. Decorate with a small sprig of mint. 



CONFECTIONERY 
CANDY PASTE 

MISS RITA BRIGHAM 

Three cups of granulated sugar and three-fourths cup of hot 
water, boiled with the red tablet of Knox's gelatine. Dissolve 
two envelopes of Knox's gelatine in three-fourths cup of cold water. 
When sugar boils put in gelatine and boil for twenty minutes. 
Take from stove and add juice and grated rind of one orange, 
two tablespoons of Sherry, one-half cup of cherries, and one cup 
of English walnuts, chopped. Turn into a cooled pan and let 
stand five or six hours; then roll in powdered sugar. 

TURKISH DELIGHT 

M. C. L. 

1 package of gelatine, soaked in 4 cups of sugar 
1 cup of lukewarm water 3^ CU P o£ 'hot water 

Boil ten minutes. Add five tablespoons of lemon juice, nine 

tablespoons of orange juice, and the grated rind of one orange. 

Cook ten minutes longer. Add one cup of chopped walnuts, 

pour into a buttered pan, and let stand over night. Cut into 

squares and roll in powdered sugar. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS 

MRS. WINTHROP C. DURFEE 

1 cup of brown sugar 1 cup of white sugar 

% cup of molasses 1 cup of milk 

% cake of Baker's chocolate, 1 tablespoon of cornstarch 
grated 

Stir together and boil half an hour. Add one teaspoon of vanilla, 
pour on buttered tins, and cut in squares when nearly cold. 

It is best to try before taking it off, by dropping a little on a 
buttered plate. It will show plainly by its hardness if it has been 
cooked long enough. 

136 



CONFECTIONERY 137 



CARAMELS 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

V/i cups of molasses V/± cups of sugar 



1 cup of grated chocolate J^ cup of milk 

Butter the size of an egg Pinch of salt 



BUTTER SCOTCH 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 

}/2 cup of butter }/% cup of milk 

1 cup of sugar 1 cup of molasses 

When boiled enough add a little soda, one teaspoon of vanilla, 
and one cup of chopped English walnuts or any other nut pre- 
ferred. 

DIVINITY FUDGE 

ADA M. ELDREDGE 

2 cups of white sugar % cup of Karo Corn syrup 

~j/s cup of cold water 

Boil together until it hardens quickly in cold water. Have 
ready the beaten whites of two eggs and one cup of chopped wal- 
nuts. Add syrup to whites, slowly, beating all the time. When 
nearly stiff add one teaspoon of vanilla and the nuts and beat 
until as white and stiff as possible. Pour on buttered pans and 
cut like fudge. 

A dry day and cooking the syrup until it hardens quickly will 
give success. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE 

MRS. W. O. WITHE RE LL 

2 cups of sugar 34 CU P oi butter 

}/2 cup of milk 13^2 squares of chocolate or 2 

tablespoons of cocoa 

Boil all together until, when tried in cold water, it will form a 
soft ball. Take from fire, add a little vanilla, one cup of nuts or 
raisins if desired, and beat until creamy. Pour into buttered pans 
and cut in squares. 



138 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE 

MRS. FREDERICK SWAN 

}/$ cup of cream 1^ CU P of cold water 

2 cups of granulated sugar 6 tablespoons of cocoa or 2 
% cup of milk squares of chocolate 

1 tablespoon of butter 2 teaspoons of vanilla 

Bring to a boil the sugar, cream, and water; add cocoa and boil 
six minutes ; add butter and boil three minutes. Take off and beat 
until cold. 

MARSHMALLOW FUDGE 

L. C. 

3 squares of chocolate 2 scant cups of sugar 
% cup of milk 

Boil about three minutes and add one tablespoon of butter. 
When dissolved add one tablespoon of marshmallow cream. 
Remove from fire, add one teaspoon of vanilla, and beat. Pour 
into pan dotted with bits of marshmallow cream. 

PEANUT BUTTER CANDY 

M. C. L. 

One-half cup of cream and four teaspoons of peanut butter, 
creamed over the fire until smooth. Add one-half cup of granu- 
lated sugar, one-half cup of brown sugar, one cup of powdered 
sugar, and one teaspoon of butter. Cook the same as any fudge. 
Take off and beat in one dozen marshmallows, cut in quarters, 
and one teaspoon of vanilla. 

COCOANUT CANDY 

L. C. 

One cup of milk, one tablespoon of butter, melted in milk. Add 
three cups of sugar and boil ten minutes. Add one cup of 
shredded cocoanut and boil two minutes. Beat hard and add 
a little vanilla. 



BEVERAGES 

"Flow wine, smile woman 

And the universe is consoled" 

— Old Proverb. 

GRAPE JUICE 

MRS. C. FRANK ALLEN. MRS. SAMUEL B. CAPEN 

Wash and stem ripe Concord grapes. Mash and put into pre- 
serving kettle. Cook slowly until well broken open, then strain 
and to each quart of juice add one cup of sugar. Boil five minutes, 
skim, and seal in glass bottles or jars. 

One cup of this juice to three cups of cold water makes an 
agreeable drink. 

PINEAPPLE WINE 

MRS. J. S. STONE 

Cut up a whole pineapple and put in pitcher with two quarts 
of water, three pounds of sugar, and one teaspoon of ground 
ginger. Let ferment over night, strain, and serve with cracked 
ice. 

If preferred the cores and rinds of two pineapples may be used. 

DANDELION WINE 

MRS. J. S. STONE 

Four quarts of boiling water poured on one quart of dandelion 
blossoms. Let stand twenty-four hours in a crock. 

Cut up four oranges and four lemons, not peeled, and cover with 
four pounds of granulated sugar. Let stand twenty-four hours. 

Combine two mixtures and add one-half yeast cake. Let stand 
four or five days, then strain through cheesecloth, and put in 
bottles. Cork lightly for three or four weeks, then seal. 

This makes a dozen bottles. 

139 



140 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



PUNCH 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

3 dozen lemons 2 dozen oranges 

Y2 dozen bananas 1 large bottle of Maraschino 

3 siphons of Vichy cherries 

4 pounds of sugar 1 pineapple, shredded 

Squeeze the oranges and lemons and boil the skins with about 
one pint of water and half the sugar. Mash the bananas and mix 
with the pineapple and cherries and the rest of the sugar. 

The punch is better if fruit and sugar are prepared the day be- 
fore using. A quart of weak tea may be added if desired. 

Just before serving add the Vichy and ice. 

CLARET PUNCH 

MRS. F. C. JILLSON 

To make one-half gallon: Over a large piece of ice pour three 
pints of claret, one quart of lemonade, made with three lemons, 
and six tablespoons of Jamaica rum. Sweeten to taste and let 
stand half an hour or more. Serve in each glass mint, straw- 
berries, pineapple, and orange. 



AFTERNOON TEA PUNCH 

MRS. W. E. CHAMBERLIN 



1 quart of pure grape juice 
4 lemons 

2 bananas 
2 oranges 

Any fruit can be added. 



3 cups of sugar 

Water, to taste (1 quart water 
to 1 quart juice) 



* WHITE WINE CUP. For Receptions, etc. 

MISS CAROLINE B. CLARK 

3 bottles of white wine 1 bottle of American cham- 

1 bottle of Apollinaris pagne 

This makes one gallon. Yi tumbler of Maraschino 



BEVERAGES 141 

MULLED WINE. Old Porter House Recipe 

MRS. GEORGE W. ABBOT 

Eight eggs to one quart (one pint of Sherry wine and one pint 
of water) . Beat yolks and whites separately, beating eight table- 
spoons of sugar with the yolks. Beat the whites to a froth and 
mix all together. Have the wine and water boiling and pour 
over the egg, stirring always. Flavor with nutmeg. 

PILGRIM PUNCH 

MRS. J. S. STONE 

To one part of grape juice and two parts of ginger ale add iced 
tea, the juice of one lemon, and sugar to taste. Serve ice cold. 



SANDWICHES 

CHICKEN SANDWICHES 

MRS. CHARLES S. PENHALLOW 

Equal parts of chicken and celery, chopped. Moisten with 
rich chicken stock and cover with broken bits of crisp sliced 
bacon. 

NUT AND CHEESE SANDWICHES 

MRS. G. W. WHEELWRIGHT, JR. 

Mix equal parts of grated Gruyere cheese and chopped English 
walnuts, then season with salt and cayenne. 

CHEESE FILLINGS 

G. G. N. 

Cream cheese mixed with chutney. 
Cream cheese mixed with mustard. 
Cream cheese mixed with pimento. 

SALMON SANDWICHES 

G. G. N. 

Boiled and finely shredded smoked salmon. Put between 
pieces of bread, toasted and served hot. 

HORSE RADISH FILLING 

MRS. EDWARD L. YOUNG, JR. 

6 tablespoons of butter 5 tablespoons of grated horse- 

1 teaspoon of lemon juice radish root 

Few grains of salt 

Cream butter; add gradually horse radish, lemon juice, and salt. 
Spread on thin slices of bread, shaped with a cutter. Serve with 
ginger ale. 

142 



SANDWICHES 143 



DATE FILLING 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

Wash the dates and remove the stones. To one pound of dates 
allow one-half pound of sugar, one cup of water, one level teaspoon 
of butter, and the grated rind of one-half lemon. Simmer until 
thick. Pour into jelly glasses any that is not used. 

DATE AND NUT FILLING 

M. C. L. 

Mash together dates and chopped nuts. Spread between slices 
of whole wheat bread. 

CHEESE FILLING 

H. L. P. 

Mix together cottage cheese and pineapple. 

SALMON SANDWICHES 

MRS. A. J. PETERS 

Cut thin slices of graham bread and fill with cold boiled salmon, 
picked fine and rubbed to a soft paste with salad oil, the yolk of 
an egg and a little lemon juice, salt and pepper. Add a few 
chopped olives. 




144 THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 

TO SERVE WITH AFTERNOON TEA 

Spread saltines with cream cheese and put candied cherry in 
center. 

Spread thin small rounds of white bread with cream cheese and 
sprinkle with finely chopped green pepper. 

Dip small squares of white bread in melted butter, heap with 
soft factory cheese flakes, dust with paprika, put in oven to melt 
cheese, and brown slightly. — g. g. n. 

SOUFFLE CRACKERS 

MRS. NATHANIEL WALES 

Split common cooking crackers in halves and soak in ice water 
about twenty minutes. Put them on a tin sheet some distance 
apart and drain off as much water as possible. Spread evenly with 
melted butter and bake in a moderate oven until a delicate 
brown. To be served with cheese or at afternoon tea. 



CANAPE 

MRS. PAUL FOLSOM 

Cut round thin slices of bread, spread with bloater paste, and 
put a very thin slice of Spanish onion on top. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

LOTION FOR CHAPPED HANDS 

MRS. M. W. RICHARDSON 

Yl pound of unground flaxseed J/£ pint of alcohol 

}/2 pint of glycerine 

Put flaxseed in saucepan with one quart of water and simmer 
all day. Strain out seeds and add the other ingredients to the 
liquor. Bottle. 

CLEANING FLUID 

MRS. HENRY L. RAND 

Y% pound of Castile soap 1 ounce of sulphuric ether 

Y2 pound of aqua ammonia 1 ounce of glycerine 

Dissolve soap in one quart of soft water. Add four quarts more 
of water and then the ether, ammonia, and glycerine. Bottle 
and shake before using. 

This will take out almost any spot. An old-fashioned recipe. 

SOAP 

MRS. C. HARRINGTON 

5 pounds of grease 1 can of Babbitt's potash 

2 tablespoons of borax 

Melt the grease, being sure there is no gravy in it, then let it 
cool. Dissolve the potash in three pints of cold water; then pour 
in slowly the cooled grease, add the borax, and stir well for fifteen 
minutes. Cut before it sets hard. 

RECIPE FOR PRESERVING EGGS 

L. C 

10 pounds of unslacked lime 9 pounds of rock salt 

15 gallons of water 

When dissolved and cold put in the eggs very carefully. 

145 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



INDEX 



Apple Cake, 99 

Charlotte, 52 

Chutney, 129 

and Cumquat Salad, 37 

Dowdy, 50 

Dumplings, 51 

Gems, 82 

Ginger, 131 

Pudding (2), 51, 52 

Pudding, individual, 52 

Sauce Cake, 102 

Souffle, 52 
Apples, Jellied, 69 
Apricot Bisque, 75 

Sauce, 72 



B 



Banana Salad, 38 
Bananas, Baked, 69 

Scalloped, 69 
Bannocks, 83 

Beach Plum Marmalade, 130 
Beaten Biscuit, 83 
Beef, Chipped, 19 

Jelly, 16 

Loaf (2), 16, 19 

Roast, au Clair, 17 
Deviled, 119 

Spanish, 20 

Spiced, 16 

Steak en Casserole, 21 
Beets, 28 
Belgian Roast, 24 
Blanc Mange, 66 
Bloater Canap6, 144 
Bordeaux Sauce, 133 
Bouillabaisse, 11 
Brains, 18 



Bran Crackers, 85 

Muffins, 86 
Bread Batter, 83 

Brown (2), 79, 80 
Titusville, 79 

Coffee Cake, 82 

Corn (2), 78 

Graham, 77 

Milk, 77 

Nut (2), 80 

Oatmeal, 79 

Shredded Wheat, 78 

Sweet Loaf, 78 
Brown Betties, 112 
Brownies, 105 

Buckwheat Griddle Cakes, 89 
Butter Cakes, 104 

Scotch, 137 



Cafe Frappe, 74 

Parfait, 76 
Cake, Method of Mixing, 90 
Cake, Almond, 102 

Angel (2), 98 

Apple, 99 

Apple Sauce, 102 

Birthday, 93 

Blueberry (2), 100, 101 

Chocolate, 94 
Layer, 94 

Dark, 102 

Devil, 99 

Devil's Food, 105 

Eggless, 92 

Butterless, Milkless, 90 
Chocolate, 91 

Fruit (2), 91 

Harrison, 97 

Irish Pound, 100 



153 



154 



INDEX 



Cake, Jelly Roll, 102 

Lace, 100 

Lady Gladys, 99 

Lemon Jelly, 101 

Lightning, 92 

Medway Ginger, 100 

Moist, 101 

Nut, 99 

One Egg, 92 

Orange, 96 

Raisin, 98 

Short, Real Scotch, 98 
Strawberry (2), 64 

Sour Milk, 101 

Spice, 96 

French, 97 
Fruit, 97 

Sponge (5), 95, 96 

Variety, 92 

Warren's, 93 

Wellesley Fudge, 93 
Cakes, Butter, 104 

Chocolate, 94 

Cocoanut, 115 

Cup, 103 

Drop, Brown Sugar, 110 
Chocolate, 107 
Molasses (3), 108, 109 
Spice, 109 

Lemon Cheese, 114 

Oatmeal, 87 

Sponge Cake Puffs, 95 
Candy, Butter Scotch, 137 

Chocolate Caramels (2), 136, 137 
Fudge, 137, 138 

Cocoanut, 138 

Divinity Fudge, 137 

Marshmallow Fudge, 138 

Paste, 136 

Peanut Butter, 138 

Turkish Delight, 136 
Carrots, Carameled, 29 
Cauliflower, Cream of, 6 
Celery Salad, 37 

Jelly Salad, 36 
Chapped Hands, Lotion for, 145 
Charlotte Russe, 55 



Cheese Balls, 41 

and Cracker Souffle, 44 

Croquettes, 41 

Dish, 43 

Fondue (2), 43 

Mixed, 41 

Omelet, 116 

Sandwiches, 142, 143 

Savory, 44 

Souffle, 42 

Soup, 6 

Straws, 43 

Swedish, 41 

Toast, 42 
Chicken en Casserole, 15 

Croquettes, 14 

a. la Gainsborough, 15 

Maryland, 13 

Molded, 16 

and Pineapple Glace, 15 

Sandwiches, 142 
Chili Sauce (3), 125 
Chocolate Cake, 94 

Cake Pudding, 55 

Cakes, 94 

Caramels, 136, 137 

Cookies, 107 

Drop Wafers, 107 

Fudge, 137-138 

Ice Cream, Sauce for, 72 

Kisses, 107 

Pudding (2), 49 
Steamed, 50 

Puffs, 107 

Sauce (2), 61, 71 

Tart, 50 
Chow-Chow, 123 
Christmas Pudding, 58 
Claret Punch, 140 
Cleaning Fluid, 145 
"Clergy's Delight," 66 
Cocoanut Cakes, 115 

Candy, 138 

Cream Pie, 62 
Cod, Fillets of, 10 

Fish, Salt, 8 

Roe, 9 



INDEX 



155 



Coffee Cake, 82 

Cookies, 113 

Cream, 64 

Jelly, 67 

Muffins, 82 

Souffle, 54 
Corn Bread, 78 

Cakes (2), 84 

Chowder, 2 

Omelet, 47 

Pudding, 30 

Salad, 39 
Cottage Pie, 21 
Crab, Mock, 116 
Cranberry Conserve, 130 

Jelly, 135 

Marmalade, 128 

Pie, 62 
Cranberries, To Cook, 134 
Croquettes, 14 
Cucumbers, Baked, Stuffed, 30 

Pickled, 124 
Custard Souffle, 53 
Cookies, Almond, 111 
Thin, 112 

Brownies, 105 

Chocolate, 107 

Cincinnati, 114 

Coffee, 113 

Cry Babies, 113 

Fruit, 108 

Hermits, 106 

Jumbles, 105 

Molasses, 111 

Peanut (3), 109-110 
Butter, 112 

Plain, 108 

Sour Milk, 113 

Spice, 110 

Sugar, 108 

D 

Date Macaroons, 112 

Muffins, 81 

Sandwiches (2), 143 
Doughnuts (2), 104 



Dumplings, Apple, 51 
College, 57 

♦ 

E 

Eggs, Alpine, 45 

Dropped, 47 

au Gratin, 44 

with Macaroni, 116 

a la Martin, 45 

Mexican, 117 

Poached, 47 

Preserved, 145 

Scrambled, 46 

Swiss, 45 
Egg Cream, 65 

Cutlets, 46 

Omelets (3), 45, 47, 116 

Puffs, 46 

Timbales, 46 

Tomatoes, 48 



Fish, Bouillabaisse, 11 
Cod, Fillets, 10 

Roe, 9 
Codfish, Salt, 8 
Croquettes, 14 
Escalloped, 9 
Fillets, Fried, 10 
Finnan Haddie (2), 8 
Hallibut Fillets, 10 
Lobster, Creamed, 119 
Morue Biscayenne, 9 
Oysters, Creamed, 118 
Fried, 119 
Scalloped, 12 
Vol-au-vent, 12 
Salmon, Molded, 11 
Shad Roe, 118 

Forcemeat, Rice Case with, 25 
Rissoles, 25 

Fowl, Braised, 13 
Deviled, 14 
Jamhalaya, 14 

Fruit Chartreuse, 75 



156 



INDEX 



Fruit Cocktail, 135 

Directions for Bottling, 122 
Pudding, 58 
Salad (2), 36, 37 
Dressing, 34 
Frozen, 35 
Fudge, Chocolate, 137, 138 
Divinity, 137 
Marshmallow, 138 



Gingerbread, 103, 104 

Fairy, 103 
Gingersnaps, 105 
Graham Bread, 77 

Puffs, 85 
Grape Conserve, 131 

Jim- Jam, 131 

Juice, 139 

and Orange Marmalade, 129 

Sherbet, 75 
Grapes, Spiced, 129 
Grapefruit, 135 

Marmalade, 128 
Griddle Cakes, Buckwheat, 89 

Flour and Indian, 88 

Indian, 89 

Rye, 89 

Shrove Tuesday, 89 

Squash, 88 

H 

Ham, Baked, 26 

Boneless, 25 

Canapes, 26 

Timbales, 26 
Heavenly Hash, 129 
Hermits (4), 106 
Horse Radish Sandwiches, 142 

Sauce, 135 



Ice Cream, 73 

Indian Griddle Cakes, 89 

Pudding, 55 
Italian Cream, 64 



Japanese Koto, 132 
Japanese Rice, 29 
Jelly, Coffee, 67 

Cranberry, 135 

Mint (2), 133 

Orange, 67 

Quince, 134 

Tomato (2), 40 

Wine, 66 
Jelly Roll, 102 
Jumbles, 105 

K 

Kisses, Chocolate, 107 
Tea, 113 

L 

Lamb Chops, Garnished, 22 

Hampton, 23 

Hashed, with Walnuts, 24 

Shoulder, 23 
Boned, 23 

Terrapin, 23 
Lemon Cream, 65 

Custard Pie, 61 

Pie, 61 
Lenten Broth, 1 
Liver Pate (2), 18, 19 

Rechauffe, 19 
Lobster, Creamed, 119 

M 

Macaroon Mousse, 74 
Macaroons, Date, 112 

H. O., 114 
Macedoine, 132 
Maple Mousse (2), 73, 74 
Marguerites (3), 114, 115 
Marmalade, Beach Plum, 130 

Cranberry, 128 

Grape and Orange, 129 

Grapefruit, 128 

Orange (2), 127 

Orange and Peach, 128 



INDEX 



157 



Marmalade, Pickled Lime, 128 
Marmalade Pudding, 56 
Marlborough Pudding, 57 

Filling, 60 
Marshmallow Dessert, 67 

Fudge, 138 

Mousse, 73 

Pudding, 67 
Meat Souffle, 17 
Meringues, 68 
Milk Sherbet, 74 
Mince Meat (2), 60 
Mint Jelly (2), 133 
Mocha Tart, 63 
Morue Biscayenne, 9 
Muffins, Blueberry, 80 

Bran (3), 86 " 

Coffee, 82 

Date, 81 

English, 87 

Entire Wheat, 81 

Lunch, 84 

Raised, 80 

Rice, 83 

Rye, 84, 85 

Squash, 86 

Western, 81 
Mulled Wine, 141 
Mushroom Soup (2), 5 
Mushrooms, Creamed, 117 

a la Mieusset, 31 

Stuffed, 30 
Mustard Pickle (2), 122, 124 

N 

Xectar Salad, 36 
Nut Bread (2), 80 
Xut Cake, 99 
Xut Pudding, 60 

O 

Oatmeal Bread, 79 
Cakes, 87 
Gems, 86 
Soup, 5 



Omelets, Cheese, 116 

Corn, 47 

Spanish, 45 
Orange Cake, 96 

Jelly, 67 

Marmalade, 127 

and Peach Marmalade, 128 

Puffs, 63 

Salad, 37 

Sauce, 63 
Oyster Rabbit, 120 
Oysters, in Chafing Dish, 118 

Creamed, 118 

Fried, 119 

Scalloped, 12 

Vol-au-vent, 12 



Pancakes, Shrove Tuesday, 89 
Pastry, Rich, 59 

Peach and Orange Marmalade, 128 
Pears, Ginger (2), 130 

Stewed, with Rice, 69 

Sweet Pickled, 125 
Peppers, Green, 31 

Stuffed, 31 
Piccalilli, 123 
Pickles, Cucumber, 124 

Mustard (2), 122, 124 

Pears, 125 

Tomatoes (2), 126 

Watermelon (2), 126, 127 
Pies, Cherry, Mock, 59 

Cocoanut Cream, 62 

Cottage, 21 

Cranberry, 62 

Green Tomato, 62 

Lemon, 61 

Custard, 61 

Washington, 53 
Pigeons, Potted, 27 
Pineapple Cream, 65 

Mousse, 73 

Salad, 36 

Wine, 139 
Plum Conserve (2), 131, 133 



158 



INDEX 



Popovers, 88 

Potatoes, Sweet (2), 28 

Pots a la Creme, 47 

Preserved Eggs, 145 

Puddings, Bread and Butter, 57 

Chocolate (2), 49 
Cake, 55 
Steamed, 50 

Christmas, 58 

Corn, 30 

Fruit, 58 

Imperial, 61 

Indian, 55 

Lemon Bread, 56 

Marlborough, 57 

Marmalade, 56 

Marshmallow, 67 

Nut, 60 

Plum, 58 

Prune, 56 

Rice (2), 53,54 
Lemon, 54 

Simple, 56 

Steamed, Annie's, 57 

Suet (2), 59 

Trilby, 68 
Puffs, Egg, 46 

Graham, 85 

Orange, 63 

Raisin, 63 
Punch, 140 

Afternoon Tea, 140 

Claret, 140 

Pilgrim, 141 



Q 



Quince Jelly, 134 

R 

Rhubarb Conserve, 132 
Rice Case, 25 
Rice, Japanese, 29 
Muffins, 83 
Pudding, 53, 54 
Waffles, 88 



Rinctum Diddie, 117 
Roquefort Cheese Dressing, 33 
Rolls, Lunch, 81 
Roman Gnocchi, 42 
Russian Dressing, 35 

Sauce, 35 
Rye Griddle Cakes, 89 

Muffins, 84, 85 



Salads, Apple and Cumquat, 37 

Banana, 38 

Cabbage, 39 

Celery, 37 
Jelly, 36 

Continental, 38 

Corn, 39 

Franconia, 39 

Fruit, 36, 37 
Frozen, 35 

Nectar, 36 

Orange, 37 

Pineapple, 36 

Shredded Wheat, 38 

Tomato and Chicken, 37 
Salad Dressing, Cabbage (2), 33, 34 

Cold Slaw, 33 

Copley, 35 

Cream, 32 

Whipped, 34 

Fruit, 34 

Mayonnaise, 32, 34 

Nectar, 36 

Roquefort Cheese, 33 

Russian, 35 
Sauce, 35 
Sandwiches, Cheese, 142, 143 

Chicken and Celery, 142 

Date (2), 143 

Horseradish, 142 

Nut and Cheese, 142 

Salmon (2), 142, 143 
Sardines, Creamed, 117 

Sauce for, 12 
Sauces, Apricot, 72 

Bordeaux, 133 



INDEX 



159 



Sauces, Chili, 125 

Chocolate (2), 61, 71 
Ice Cream, For, 72 

Cream, 71 

Devilled, 12 

Foamy (2), 53, 54 

Grandmother's, 71 

Hard, 58 

Horseradish, 135 

Mint Marshmallow, 49 

Orange, 62 

Russian, 35 

Strawberry, 71 

Tomato, for Fish, 10 
for Omelets, 47 
Scones, 87 
Shad Roe, 118 
Sherbet, Grape, 75 

Milk, 74 
Short Cake, Scotch, 98 

Strawberry (2), 64 
Shredded Wheat Bread, 78 

Salad-, 38 
Soap, 145 

Souffle Crackers, 144 
Souffle, Apple, 52 

. Cheese and Cracker, 44 

Coffee, 54 

Custard, 53 

Meat, 17 
Soups, Baked Bean, 1 

Beet, 3 

Black Bean (2), 3 

Cauliflower, 6 

Cheese, 6 

Clam, 4 

Corn Chowder, 2 

Lenten Broth, 1 

Lettuce, 6 

Mushroom (2), 5 

Oatmeal, 5 

Palestine, 6 

Pea, 3 

Squash, 1 

Tomato Bisque, 2 

Vegetable (2), 4 

Velvet, 5 



Soups, White (2), 2 

Spaghetti, 28 

Spanish Omelet, 45 

Spiff, 68 

Squash Griddle Cakes, 88 

Muffins, 86 

Soup, 1 
Steak, Roasted, 20 
Stew, Baked, 22 
Strawberries, Preserved, 129 
Strawberry Sauce, 71 

Short Cake (2), 64 

Sponge, 66 
Sweet Breads, 17 



Tapioca, Savory, 38 
Tart, Chocolate, 50 

Mocha, 63 
Tarts, Sand 
Tea Kisses, 113 
Tomato Butter, 134 

and Chicken Salad, 37 

Croutes, 29 

Eggs, 48 

Jelly (2), 40 

Pie, Green, 62 

Relish, Cold, 132 

Sauce, for Fish, 10 

Sauce for Omelets, 47 
Tomatoes in Aspic, 39 

with Cheese, 30 

Curried, 120 

Fried, 31 

Green, Pickled, 126 

Sweet, Pickled, 126 
Tongue, Baked, 21 
Tortoni, 75 
Trilby Pudding, 68 
Turkish Delight, 136 
Tutti Frutti, 72 

V 

Veal Cutlets, 26 
Fricandeau, 20 



i6o 



INDEX 



Veal, Melton, 25 

and Onions, 119 
Vegetables, Beans, Baked, 29 

Beets, 28 

Carrots, Carameled, 29 

Corn Pudding, 30 
Omelet, 47 

Cucumbers, Baked, Stuffed, 30 

Mushrooms, 30, 31 

Peppers (2), 31 

Potatoes, Sweet (2), 28 

Rice, 29 

Spaghetti, 28 

Tomatoes, 29, 31 
Venison, 120 



Venison, Mock, 120 
Virginia Sweetmeats, 126 

W 

Waffles, Cream, 87 
Rice, 88 

Washington Pie, 53 

Welsh Rabbit, 43 

White Dessert, 68 

White Wine Cup, 140 

Wine, Dandelion, 139 
Mulled, 141 
Pineapple, 139 

Wine Jelly, 66 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



CC 



Choisa" Ceylon Tea 



lib. 

Canisters 

60 cents 



PURE 

FRAGRANT 

RICH 




1-2 lb. 

Canisters 

35 cents 



Packed in 
parchment-lined 
one-pound 
and half-pound 
canisters 



We invite comparisons with other Teas 
of the same or higher price 

BOSTON S. S. PIERCE CO. BROOKLINE 



M. T. WALLACE 

GROCERIES 

and 

PROVISIONS 

Cor. Centre and Myrtle Sts. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



Compliments of 

MALONE & KEANE 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 




Decorative Linens 

Embroidery Linens 

Housekeeping Linens 



T. D. WHITNEY & CO. 

Temple Place and West Street 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Mr. Edison's thirty-seven 
years of effort is represented 

in his 

Diamond 
Disc Phonograph 



Demonstration Rooms 
THE EDISON SHOP 

F.H.THOMAS CO. 

691 Boylston Stieet 
Boston, Mass. 




Gowns, Tailored Costumes, Coats and Waists 



Dancing Dresses a Specialty 



717 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 



Telephone, 5818 B. B. 



Telephone, Jamaica 645-W 

MRS. FLORENCE A. RICE 

Ladies' Hairdresser 

Backward Shampooing, Facial and Scalp 

Treatment, Manicuring, Pedicuring, Chiropody 

Switches, Puffs and Transformations 

from Combings 

Hair Goods Toilet Preparations 

713 CENTRE ST., JAMAICA PLAIN 

Between Burroughs and Eliot Streets 



Compliments 

of 
A FRIEND 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



Telephone, Jamaica 428-W 

F. COOPER 

Manufacturer of 

Window and Door Screens 

WINDOW SHADES 
18 Bartlett Square -DncTWivr 

Jamaica Plain Station rSUOHJlN 


Langdon's Art Store 
Post Cards 

Developing, Printing and Enlarging, Picture 

Framing and Tinting. Special Attention 

given to Amateur Work 

751 Centre Street JAMAICA PLAIN 


Thomas Mayo & Co. 

HARDWARE, CUTLERY 

Ranges, Furnaces, Plumbing, Painters' 
Supplies, etc. 

149 Green Street 
JAMAICA PLAIN, MASS. 


Charles F. Smith 

Painting and Decorating 

2 Myrtle St., Jamaica Plain 

Telephone 


Sanning's Pharmacy 

the Rexall STORE 
109 Green Street JAMAICA PLAIN 


B. F. Godfrey & Co. 

PLUMBERS and GASFITTERS 

Metal Conductors and Gutters 

769 Centre Street, opp. Greenough Ave. 

Telephone 

Connection JAMAICA PLAIN, MASS. 


McFARLAND & COE 

Dealers in 

Fish and Oysters 

113 Green Street JAMAICA PLAIN 


G. F. Stodder 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealer in 


Jamaica Floral Co. 

Jf resty Cut Jf lotoer* 

Floral Designs and Decorations 

707 Centre Street 
JAMAICA PLAIN 

Tels. Jamaica 398-W; Res. 1945-W 


Ocean, Lake and 
River 

FISH 


Pining with pain and pensive with fear, 
Suing for kind hands, most gentle and dear, 
Come where you '11 find them, by night and by day, 
And bring back to health, then send thee away. 

Compliments of 

JOHN T. GRUNDY 

TAILOR 


174 Friend Street 
BOSTON 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



CYRUS BREWER & CO. 



EVERY KNOWN KIND OF 



INSURANCE 



44 KILBY STREET 

(Entire Building) 



ALFRED M. BULLARD 
ARTHUR K. POPE 



ARTHUR B. GILMORE 
WILLIAM T. ULMAN 



Jfe 




" Connoisseurs " 


Compliments of 


T. W. NORMAN CO. 


E. C. BURKE 


Pictures & Frames 




Printing & Developing 




Greeting Cards 




55 Bromfield Street 




BOSTON, MASS. 





THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 




TWAOC jM^HK. 



Hood's Milk Wins 



— But the awards mean as much to you as they do to us. In the Milk and Cream 
Exhibits held throughout New England, under the supervision of Agricultural Col- 
leges and State Dairymen's Associations, H. P. HOOD & SONS are repeatedly 
awarded the HIGHEST SCORE. Keen competition with other New England brands 
of milk is the rule, but HOOD'S WINS OUT. HOOD'S MILK is always the same. 
The same verdict. The same award. Can you afford to use milk, or to recommend 
milk, that is, by actual test, less perfect than HOOD'S ? 

H. P. HOOD & SONS, Dairy Experts 

Order of our salesmen, write or telephone 



THE BABY 

A Book for Mothers and 
Nurses 

By 

DANIEL ROLLINS BROWN, M.D. 

Cloth, pp. 200. $1.00 net 



"An excellent book of practical in- 
struction." — Springfield Republican. 

"In reading one constantly loses sight 
of the fact of being under the doctor's 
orders, although the conviction grows 
stronger that the writer knows all that 
is to be known about babies. — American 
Journal of Nursing. 



WHITCOMB & BARROWS 

Publishers 

Huntington Chambers 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




CATS PAV 

CUSHION 

RUBBER HEELS 

are the heels for you, because 
they make walking safe as 
well as comfortable. 

"Worn regularly bythousands 
whohave tried other kindsfirst. 
50c. attached. All dealers. 

Foster Rubber Co., Boston, Mass. 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



MACDUFF 

Linen Specialty Co. 

453 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

Telephone, Oxford 6293 

Boston's Newest Specialty 
Shop 

\\ 7E are direct agents for 
▼ V leading Scotch and Irish 
manufacturers of household lin- 
ens, also distributers of blankets, 
spreads, sheets, and pillow cases 
direct from the mills. Retailed 
at wholesale prices. 

We solicit a share of your patronage 


Compliments of 

The 

State Street 

Trust Co. 


Telephone, Jamaica 1079-M 

Whiting & McLean 

CARPENTERS and BUILDERS 

Jobbing and Remodeling 
Asbestos Shingles Applied 
Plans and Estimates Given 

653 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 


J. ESSELEN 

Successor to 

MRS. J. C. WHITE 

Artists' Materials, School Supplies, 
Kindergarten Goods, Children's Nov- 
elties, Souvenir Post Cards and Albums 
Greeting Cards for all occasions. 


Telephone, Jamaica 1939-W Residence, 1366-M 

George S.Jacobs 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
Insurance 

650 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Corner Green Street 


19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 


Charles E. Moody & Co. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 


Telephone, Jf8j Jamaica 

Edward McCarthy 

Trunk & Bag Repairing 

644 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 


Matchless Brand 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

229-231 State St. Boston, Mass. 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 


Tel. Richmond 540 

Weston - Thurston 
Company 

DEALERS IN 


ESTABLISHED 1834 

E. & F. King & Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Importers of and Dealers in 

Drugs and Chemicals 

Bleaching Powders Saltpetre 
Sal Soda Soda Ash 



Beef, Lamb, Mutton 
Veal, Pork, Poultry 
Butter, Cheese, Eggs 

STALLS 20-22-24 

New Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



Sal Glauber 
Sulphur 
Sal Epsom 
Caustic Soda 
Crystal Carbonate 

Soda 
Borax 
Copperas 



Bichromate Potash 

Alum 

Dextrine 

Flaxseed 

58% Alkali 

Blue Vitriol 

Brimstone 

Bicarb. Soda, Etc. 



367-369 Atlantic Avenue 

BOSTON 



Hoarseness, Coughs 

inflammation of the throat, bronchial and 
asthmatic troubles are relieved promptly 
by the use of 

BROWN'S 
Bronchial Troches 

Safe to use whenever required to check a 
cough and clear the voice in singing or 
speaking. Entirely free from opiates in 
any form. 

Sold everywhere in boxes — never in bulk 

Prices, 25c, 50c, and $1.00 

Sample sent on request 

JOHN I. BROWN & SON, BOSTON 

TD-D/^-XTT-lvpC SAPONACEOUS 
JD 1S.KJ WIN O CAMPHORATED 

DENTIFRICE 

Keeps the teeth and gums in healthy con- 
dition. Leaves a particularly clean and 
pleasant feeling in the mouth. 

Price, 25 cents. Sample sent on request 

Manf d by John I. Brown & Son, Boston 

Curtis & Brown Mfg. Co., Ltd., New York 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 


JOHN A. 




WHITTEMORE'S 




SONS 


Gerry 


Coal 


& Northrup Co. 


and 




Wood 


BUILDERS 


TELEPHONES 


458 Harrison Avenue 


Jamaica Plain . . . 273 Jamaica 
WestRoxbury ... 170 Bellevue 




Eventually 

GOLD MEDAL 


CALL US UP 

The next time you have a Printing order 
and we'll do the work so promptly and 
reasonably that you won't have to call 
us down 

Book, Catalogue, Law 
and 



FLOUR 



, Why Not Now ? 



Commercial Printing 

in fact anything that you may need in the 
printing line can be secured at reasonable 
prices at the 

Jamaica Printing Co. 

66-68 Seaverns Avenue, Jamaica Plain 

Telephones, Jamaica 1300, 1301 
LINOTYPE COMPOSITION FOR THE TRADE 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



$weeper~)/a& 



INSIST ON THE NAME IN GOLD ON THE TOP 

The original and positively the only 3 in 1 

COMBINATION BRUSH AND 
VACUUM CARPET SWEEPER 

$6.50 $8.50 $10.50 

Combining a complete brush carpet-sweeper 
and a complete vacuum carpet-sweeper. 
Either member used separately or in com 
bination. Over 300,000 Sweeper- Vacs in use. 

Officially chosen for the Model Kitchen 
World's Panama-Pacific Exposition 
San Francisco, 1915 

PNEUVAC COMPANY 

59 Temple Place 
BOSTON, MASS. 




This 3 in I. Combination Sweeper-Vac: Modef'S'j 



Telephone 4985 Fort Hill 



M. S. Kirshen 



THE ALPINE PRESS 

BOOK AND COMMERCIAL 

Printers 

" The So Different Kind " 

32 Oliver Street, Boston, Mass. 



Patronize a High-Class Laundry 

Our Work is the Best in the City 

Flat work 30 cents per doz. One-half 
doz. 15 cents; over one-half doz. 25 cents. 
Rough dry pieces 3 cents each. Plain 
shirts 12 cents, collars 2 cents each. No 
package received less than 10 cents. 

The Booker Custom Laundry 

INC. 

31 Corey Street, West Roxbury 

Telephone, 474 Bellevue 



We Use 



STAPLES 
FLOOR WAX 



FAULKNER HOSPITAL 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



Wfuttemom 

It Shoe Polishes 



Fl N ES T QUALITY 



LARGEST VARIETY 



U EDC# 

DRESSINC 

l> s c h>* ms 
BLACKSHQE5 



SOFTENS 

PRESERVES 

LEATHER 

""RESTORES.'" 
COLOR 

LUSTRE 




"GILT EDGE," the only ladies' shoe dressing- that 
positively contains Oil. Blacks, Polishes and Pre- 
serves ladies' and children's shoes, shines without 
rubbing, 25c. "FRENCH GLOSS," 10c. 

"STAR" combination for cleaning and polishing all 
kinds of russet or tan shoes, 10c. "DANDY" size, 25c. 

"OIL PASTE" Blacks, Polishes and Preserves. I,arge 
tin boxes with easy cover remover attached. 

Also Russet 'Oil Paste" same size box, each 10c. 

"BABY ELITE" combination for grentlemen who 
take pride in having- their shoes look Al. Restores 
color and lustre to all black shoes. Polish with a 
brush or cloth, 10 cents. "ELITE" size, 25 cents. 

If your dealer does not keep the kind you want, send us 
the price in stamps for full size package, charg-es paid. 

WHITTEMORE BROS. & CO., 

20-26 Albany Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

The Oldest and Largest Manufacturers of 

Shoe Polishes in the. World. 




THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



Crockery 
£hina and Glass 



Newest shapes and decorations of China Table 
Ware and ornamental Pieces from the best Potter- 
ies and Glass Factories of England, France, Ger- 
many, Japan, and America. 

Extensive exhibits in the 

DINNER SET DEPARTMENT 
ART POTTERY ROOMS 

GLASSWARE DEPARTMENT 
LAMP DEPARTMENT 

STOCK PATTERN DEPARTMENT 
KITCHEN DEPARTMENT 
HOTEL AND CLUB DEPARTMENT 

Inbiief, ten floors of China, Glass and Lamps, from 
the low cost to the most expensive specimens, in- 
cluding the newest and best things on sale in the best 
China Shops in London, Paris, Berlin and Vienna. 



Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

China and Glass Merchants 

(Ten Floors) Wholesale and Retail 

33 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON 

Near Washington and Summer Sts. 



Compliments of 
WEBSTER & ATLAS NATIONAL 

OF BOSTON 

SEARS BUILDING 





PUREOXIA 


THE MUTUAL 
NATIONAL BANK 

40 State Street 


GINGER ALE 

MADE WITH DISTILLED WATER 


BOSTON, MASS. 






Compliments of 
E. W. CLARK CO. 




THE SQUARE STORE ON A 
ROUND CORNER 



THE FAULKNER COOK BOOK 



Frederick Bullock 


J. W. PATTERSON & t 


HOUSE PAINTER AND 


Groceries and Provisions 


INTERIOR DECORATOR 


Choice Family Wines and Liquors 


718 Centre Street 


134-136 South Street, cor. Bovnton 


JAMAICA PLAIN, MASS. 


JAMAICA PLAIN 


Compliments of 




JWnutllt&^ucr 


Compliments of 


3fetoelers 


WALDO J. STOKES 


24 Winter Street 


• 


N. T. CROWELL 


Bureau of Social Wants 


House Painting 

Dealer in Wall Papers and Painters' 
Supplies 


Where every Practical Social Want 

of Modern Household may 

be supplied 


107 Park Street 
WEST ROXBURY, MASS. 


59 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 


Telephone, 492-W. Bel. 


Room 702. Telephone Connection 


Neighborhood Kitchen 




and Exchange 

Homemade Preserves Order Cooking 
Handicraft Articles 

MRS. A. R. JOHNSTON 


GEORGE W. KENYON 

INSURANCE 


88 Seaverns Avenue JAMAICA PLAIN 




Telephone, Jamaica 2031-W 




O. S.WELSH 

Upholstering 

Furniture Repairing and Refinishing 
Dining Tables Finished in Oil 


P. F. DRESSER 

Newsdealer 


1926 Centre Street 


731 CENTRE STREET 


WEST ROXBURY, MASS. 

Telephone Connection 


JAMAICA PLAIN 




CRANBERRY JEWEL SALAD 

A gem for the turkey dinner 

1 package raspberry 
flavored gelatine 

V/ 2 cups boiling water 

1 can Ocean Spray 
Cranberry Sauce (Jel- 
lied or Whole) 

1 orange 

Dissolve raspberry 
gelatine in boiling wa- 
ter. Chill until mixture 
begins to thicken. If 
jellied cranberry sauce 
is used, crush with a fork. Quarter orange, remove seeds, put 
rind and pulp through food chopper. Fold cranberry sauce and 
orange into raspberry jello. Chill until firm. Serves 6. 

CRANBERRY APPLE SALADS 

1 envelope unflavored gelatine V* lemon 
V4 cup cold water 1 apple 

1 pound can Ocean Spray Jellied Cranberry Sauce 

Place gelatine in custard cup. Add cold water. Let stand 

2 minutes. Place custard cup in pan of boiling water until 
gelatine dissolves. Crush canned jellied cranberry sauce with 
fork and add dissolved gelatine. Chill. Coarsely grind lemon, 
apple in food grinder. When gelatine mixture begins to jell, 
stir in lemon, apple. Turn into rectangular pan and chill until 
firm. Cut in squares and serve in lettuce cups with mayonnaise. 

Page Five 



CRANBERRY TURKEYS . . . 

Will Steal the Limelight on Your Table! 

You'll have compliments galore if you serve cranberry sauce 
cut in the shape of plump little turkeys! They're easy to make. 
Just cut Ocean Spray 

Jellied Cranberry ^KBj%&!~*~ .■ ~ ~ * > f"" , *--_ 

Sauce into half- inch 
slices, then using a tur- 
key-shaped cutter, cut 
one turkey from each 
slice. Serve on a festive 
platter alongside the 
turkey platter ... OR 
mount cranberry tur- 
keys on apple or 
orange slices. 




For your convenience, the Ocean Spray 
people have made a bright red plastic 
turkey cutter just the right size to cut 
one turkey from each slice of cranberry 
sauce. It may be had for 1 Ocean Spray 
Cranberry Sauce label and 104 sent to 
i( Ocean Spray", Hanson, Mass. 




Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce is 
packed by the cranberry growers 
of Massachusetts, New Jersey, Wis- 
consin, Washington, and Oregon 
and comes two ways: 

Jellied Cranberry Sauce to cut in 
plump slices or fancy shapes . . . 
Whole Cranberry Sauce with plump 
berries in sweetened syrup. 

Carries Good Housekeeping and 
Parents' Magazines seals of ap- 
proval. 



§cean(if^^B^ 



&tht»ritrJr*f 




JNkbryu 




HOW TO ROAST TURKEY AND 
WHAT TO SERVE WITH IT! 

(To prepare turkey for the oven see center pages) 





ROASTING TABLE 


Total 


Ready-to-cook 


Oven Cooking time 


Cooking time 


Weight 


Temperature Minutes per lb. 


Hours 


8 to 10 


325° F. 20 to 25 


3 to zy 2 


10 to 14 


325° F. 18 to 20 


Z]/ 2 to 4 


14 to 18 


300° F. 15 to 18 


4 to 4J4 


18 to 20 


300° F. 13 to 15 


AV 2 to 5 



TO ROAST: 

Place breast-side down on rack in shallow pan. Cover top 
and sides with fat-moistened cloth or aluminum foil. 

Do not sear. Do not cover. Do not add water. 

Place in pre-heated oven set at proper temperature and bake 
according to time chart. 

When the turkey is done, the fleshy part of the drumstick 
will feel soft when pressed with the fingers (use paper or 
cloth when touching the hot turkey). Then try moving the drum- 
stick up and down. When the leg joint moves readily, the 
turkey is done. 

TO SERVE: 

Serve with Cranberry Sauce, Cranberry Relish, or Cranberry 
Salad (see pages 4, 5, and 6). 



Page She 




1. Rub cavity with salt. 
Fill neck with stuff- 
ing to give a well- 
rounded appear- 
ance. 



2. Fasten neck skin 
back with skewer. L 



IT'S EASY TO TRUSS AND ROAST 
A TURKEY 

To truss a turkey means to bind legs and wings 
to the body for roasting. The turkey cooks unu 
formly. It browns more evenly and carving is 
simplified. 

To stuff and truss: Follow directions given with each 
illustration. 







3. Lift wing up and 
out forcing tip back 

A to rest against neck 
skin. 



6. Turkey, breast down, 
to roast. m 



Stuff cavity well, but 
do no pack. (Allow 
1 to XVt cups dress- 
ing per pound of 
turkey). Lace open- 
ing to hold stuffing. 



5. Tie legs together 
A and fasten to tail. 




Page Two 



Page Three 



WHAT TO SERVE WITH TURKEY 

Cranberry sauce, of coursel Turkey and cranberry sauce have 
been partners since the days of the Pilgrims. Easiest way to 
serve cranberry sauce with turkey is to open a can of Ocean 
Spray, but for variety, try these delicious relishes and salads. 



CRANBERRY-ORANGE RELISH 

A Favorite Relish with Turkey 
1 orange 
1 can Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce (Jellied or Whole) 

Put orange through food chopper, rind and all. If jellied 
cranberry sauce is used, crush with a fork. Stir in chopped 
orange. Chill in re- 
frigerator several 
hours to permit fla- 
vors to blend. Makes 
approximately 2 cups 
relish. 



CRANBERRY-APPLE-LEMON RELISH 

Crisp, tangy f and delicious 
1 large apple 
% lemon 
1 can Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce (Jellied or Whole) 

Put apple and lemon (including rind and pulp) through food 
chopper. If jellied cranberry sauce is used, crush with a fork. 
Stir in chopped apple and lemon. Chill in refrigerator several 

hours to permit flavors to blend. 

Page Four